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Publisher's Summary

Harper Lee’s Pulitzer prize-winning masterwork of honor and injustice in the deep south - and the heroism of one man in the face of blind and violent hatred, available now for the first time as a digital audiobook.

One of the best-loved stories of all time, To Kill a Mockingbird has been translated into more than 40 languages, sold more than 30 million copies worldwide, served as the basis for an enormously popular motion picture, and was voted one of the best novels of the 20th century by librarians across the country. A gripping, heart-wrenching, and wholly remarkable tale of coming-of-age in a South poisoned by virulent prejudice, it views a world of great beauty and savage inequities through the eyes of a young girl, as her father - a crusading local lawyer - risks everything to defend a black man unjustly accused of a terrible crime.

An Audible for Dogs Pick: Make your dog's day. Cesar Millan shares how audiobooks can make dogs happier and calmer. Learn more.
©1988 Harper Lee (P)2006 HarperCollins Publishers

Critic Reviews

"It's good to be reminded of the power wielded by this classic of American literature. As the introductory music fades and Sissy Spacek begins her narration, we immediately enter the small town in the Deep South where all the timeless issues of kindness and cruelty, inclusion and prejudice are played out in a story told by a little girl named Scout. Instead of offering a range of accents, Spacek reads the story entirely in her own, or Scout's, voice. The choice works, for the book is written from Scout’s point of view, and Spacek has just the right level of Southern accent for easy listening. This is an unforgettable story well told. 2007 Audies Award Winner." (AudioFile magazine)

"Atticus Finch is a timeless American hero who has been played by the likes of Gregory Peck in film and Jeff Daniels on the stage. But in Sissy Spacek’s narration of To Kill a Mockingbird, it’s Harper Lee’s narrator, Scout, who becomes the listener’s moral guiding light and closest confidante. You forget you’re listening to the voice of an adult, so wholly do Spacek’s Southern rhythms embody the young tomboy as she witnesses the racial injustices of the Depression-era South unfold before her." (The New York Times Book Review)

Featured Article: 35+ Quotes About Books That Truly Speak to Bibliophiles


Novels, memoirs, short stories, essay compilations, and more continue to shape who we are and how we view the world, no matter what format—physical book, ebook, or audiobook—we use to absorb and enjoy them. Books are pathways into different worlds and different lives, and one can never be truly bored with a good book. Celebrate your literary love with these quotes about books that will inspire you to dive into your next story.

What listeners say about To Kill a Mockingbird

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What a pairing

A wonderful narration by Sissy Spacek adds to the enjoyment of this classical literary gem.

13 people found this helpful

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So much talent. So much warmth and wisdom. A gift.

The positive reviewers rave about this masterpiece, and every single one of them is right. It is hard to find words to adequately describe how powerful this accomplishment is. I had seen the movie about fifty years ago, and I remember thinking that Gregory Peck was the only man who could play Atticus Finch. Well, now comes Sissy Spacek, who plays all of the characters in the book with grace, gentleness and love. We get to know Scout, Jem and Atticus so completely, so intimately: they feel like our family, only better. Atticus is without doubt the perfect father, never losing his temper even in the face of the astonishing evil that his own townspeople serve up. I spent two years in the South in the 1960s. Some of the people there still had the unimaginable prejudice against black people: one of my fraternity brothers at Vanderbilt, an otherwise fine guy, could not eat in the same room as a black person. The book evokes memories of lots of people like that. You just cannot understand them. Even the knowledge that they grew up in that environment, that they had no choices about what to think, but when they grow up and see the true evil on offer in the world? How can they not gain a little wisdom?
This book is a true American masterpiece, a work that could not have arisen out of any country other than ours. Racial prejudice is everywhere, of course, but the particular brand of it that lives in the American South is so insidious, so horrid, that the mind boggles. The kind of animal that Bob Ewell is, a man who repeatedly rapes and beats his own daughter and then blames all of his misery on the innocent Tom Robinson: this is a tragedy that chokes us up. It should not happen. Harper Lee absolutely deserved the Pulitzer and every other award she could receive. There is more wisdom in one chapter of this book than in literally dozens of novels that I have read. You must listen to it yourself, at least once. I will let a year go by, and then begin again with the joy that only this performance gives. I hope you love it too.

12 people found this helpful

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Don't hesitate for a even second... !!!

I have search for this book on Audible regularly, hoping it would eventually appear - oh my goodness, it was well worth the wait! The book is the much beloved, Pulitzer Prize winning classic we all met in school.

The only question left is "how is the narration?"
The answer: Sissy Spacek does as good as I have heard or better!
Wish I could give this book a 10 star rating.

62 people found this helpful

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:/

This book is great for teachers to give to students if they wanna put us through hell. :)

7 people found this helpful

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...not a rattle left in any sentence.

Like many others, I've read this book a number of times and have always appreciated it as very fine work. Hearing it - rather than reading it - is a completely different experience. Simply said, I fell in love with it.

In a novel, James Lee Burke writes about his fictional daughter Alafair editing her own work until there isn't a "rattle left in any sentence." That's a perfect description for Harper Lee's writing. Even though I've read it before, I really missed just how perfectly this prose has been crafted. It's so tight. When I slowed down and listened, it became apparent. On that level alone, it's brilliant.

The issues of race, respect and otherness it raises are just as relevant today as they were in 1960 when it was written and in 1935 where it was set. The characters have a timeless appeal. I have a greater appreciation of the balance between observations by a child and interpretation of those events by a grown woman looking back. For some reason, this too became clearer listening to the book rather than reading it.

Sissy Spacek does a terrific job with the material. Her narration isn't spectacular in a Will Patton or George Guidall kind of way. Rather, it's understated. She never gets in the way of the story. She's perfect as the older, wiser Scout looking back. I loved listening to her and the subtle way she reads the book and gives voice to its characters. Perhaps another narrator would have given the book a showier treatment. Spacek gives it authenticity.

There are only three other authors who leave me so awed with their talent: Wallace Stegner, Eudora Welty and Willa Cather. Their books are a pleasure to experience again and again. This is no exception. It doesn't matter how many times you've read this book. Listening to it is a new experience and well worth a credit.

39 people found this helpful

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Terrible

It's not loading I had to delete so many apps and songs on my phone but it's still not working. This is very frustrating!

2 people found this helpful

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Perfectly presented

Any additional comments?

Sissy Spacek gave this book the narration it deserves. She brought this classic American Novel to life. Writing reviews is not my strong suit but this audio book is highly recommended.

24 people found this helpful

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Don't read its trash

This book is so bad it makes people cry of boredom. If you read this you will hate yourself and want to eat all the poison in the world.

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I know it's an American classic, but...

Holy smokes this book is so dull and boring that I just couldn't bring myself to finish it. And I did really try... a couple of times. It feels like the story never really progresses. I tried to listen to this because I know it is an important classic piece of literature of its time, but I also think that this book hasn't seen time well and is so irrelevant to today's youth that they'll struggle with it as well. One reason why I couldn't get into this could also be the fact that I am not American and therefore might not really understand the cultural and societal issues this book talks about. That's why it was impossible to relate to the characters in any way. Narrator was fine, but due to the Southern accent, I sometimes struggled to understand what she was saying.

1 person found this helpful

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Underwhelming and Inappropriate for Modern Kids

Racial epithets should not be in the classroom. I think this is a fine read at the college level if the focus is on southern culture in the great depression, but the story is too shallow for much critical analysis at that level. Unfortunately, this book goes beyond the Huckleberry Finn type racism discussion opportunities and focuses on it (and bias) as the main topic.

The moral lessons are significant and proper, but ultimately the slow pace means that kids will skip through much of it and instead of learning important multicultural lessons, they will just be exposed to racist dialog, scenarios, and stereotypes that serve to further divide students along racial lines. If you want to belittle your black students, play this book in class.

1 person found this helpful