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Publisher's Summary

Aristotle's Poetics is best known for its definitions and analyses of tragedy and comedy, but it also applies to truth and beauty as they are manifested in the other arts. In our age, when the natural and social sciences have dominated the quest for truth, it is helpful to consider why Aristotle claimed poetry is more philosophical and more significant than history. Like so many other works by Aristotle, the Poetics has dominated the way we have thought about all forms of dramatic performance in Europe and America ever since. The essence of poetry lies in its ability to transcend the particulars of everyday experience and articulate universals, not merely what has happened but what might happen and what ought to happen.

© Agora Publications

Public Domain (P)2015 Agora, New Internet Technologies

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

a careful reading of a great classic

This is an important work for all lovers of literature and the theater, read slowly and carefully by the reader in such a way as to allow for easy understanding of text that can be dense at times.

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars

Sorry, the narrator's lisp killed this for me.

Didn't make it passed four minutes due to narrator's lisp. Just became like nails on a chalkboard for me.

0 of 3 people found this review helpful