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On the Soul & Parva Naturalia

By: Aristotle
Narrated by: James Cameron Stewart
Length: 8 hrs and 55 mins
5 out of 5 stars (3 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Two contrasting reflections by Aristotle which cover very particular ground. In 'On the Soul', Aristotle presents his view of the 'life essence' which, he argues, is possessed by living things whether plants, animals or humans.

Not a 'soul' in the generally accepted Western use of the term, this 'soul', he says, is a life force that is indivisible from the organism that possesses it. The essay is divided into three books. Presenting his concept in book I, he further describes the structure of the 'souls' of plants, animals and humans in book II and book III.

In 'The Parva Naturalia' ('Little Physical Treatises'), Aristotle continues his investigation into the biology of life and the links between body and 'soul'. It consists of seven essays: 'Sense and Sensibilia', 'On Memory', 'On Sleep', 'On Dreams', 'On Divination in Sleep', 'On Length and Shortness of Life', 'On Youth', 'Old Age', 'Life and Death' and 'Respiration'.

Translation by A. J. Smith.

Translation by J I Beare and G R T Ross.

Public Domain (P)2018 Ukemi Productions Ltd

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DeAnima. Aristotle on the soul.

There are different kinds of works for those seeking spiritual awakening. This text is about the soul and nature. It's a psychological and biological text, the mind and the body as substance. It's about the different kinds of operations of living things, the various degrees of life. DeAnima is a philosophical, not a theological text. If you dig Aristotle, you'll like this reading.