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Publisher's Summary

Paul Bäumer is just 19 years old when he and his classmates enlist. They are Germany’s Iron Youth who enter the war with high ideals and leave it disillusioned or dead. As Paul struggles with the realities of the man he has become, and the inscrutable world to which he must return, he is led like a ghost of his former self into the war’s final hours. All Quiet is one of the greatest war novels of all time, an eloquent expression of the futility, hopelessness and irreparable losses of war.

©1958 Erich Maria Remarque (P)1994 Recorded Books, LLC

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.6 out of 5.0
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Story

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  • Chris
  • Marietta, GA, United States
  • 12-20-17

Both intellectual and visceral. A story you know.

It's a story that people today have probably read or watched dozens of times over the years, in subsequent books and movies (Saving Private Ryan, Platoon, Dunkirk, The Things They Carried). But Erich Maria Remarque arguably wrote of it first in this 1928 book, with such vivid detail and from the German point of view. In it describing with palpable detail the horrors of war, seeing bodies torn asunder right next to you (and become accustomed to it), the distinctive sounds and the smells. The disillusionment of patriotism and asking why you are at war, and for whose gain. The devastating impact years of those horrors have on one's mental state, turning them into a lost generation of boys that are burned out, shell shocked, and unable to relate to, or communicate with ordinary people for most of the rest of their lives (undoubtedly what later becomes more commonly understood as PTSD).

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This was hard

Almost too good of a description of the horrors of war and the awful experiences of the soldiers, but also the very real hardships and emotional toll it takes on the families and people on the home front. The events took place 100 years ago in WW1, but the story transcends time and is as current as Afghanistan. We may not be in a world war now so the entire nation is not directly affected, but the message is still as applicable to those who have been drawn in now as it was for the soldiers of WW1.

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Like listening to a Symphony

What did you love best about All Quiet on the Western Front?

Quite unexpectedly, I found the book to be written with beautifully poetic prose. Remarque's words were so expressive that I felt they could have been written by Kahil Gabran. Then factor in the stunningly nuanced narration by Frank Muller, and you completely eclipse the genre of an audio book, and step into the aesthetic experience of hearing a symphony. It had that level of refinement.

Who was your favorite character and why?

The main character, of course. He was full of deep, and thoughtful ruminations about the experience of the war and the psychological cost it visited on those on the front.

What does Frank Muller bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

His nuanced treatment of the material caught me completely by surprise. He narrates the beautiful prose of this book with such a soft touch that I found it hypnotic. In particular, his casual and thoughtful pace, even pausing occasionally when covering strong passages. The effect was that it gave Remarque's words the space necessary for them to sink into my bones. His performance was simply stunning.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes. I could have easily listened to it straight through had I that much time. As it was, I finished it in two days.

Any additional comments?

I'm still blown away by the Remarque's deeply thoughtful and expressive writing, and Frank Muller's treatment of the story. It was absolutely mesmerizing.

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  • Shirley
  • Minneapolis, MN, United States
  • 12-14-17

Mandatory Reading for the good of humanity<br />

Exceptional writing and impressively narrated, this tragic story should be read by leadership everywhere. While the horrors of war and tragedies of our boys dying in them is sobering enough, the struggles of clinging to life and hope in the most desperate of times that these boys faced should remind us all of the fragile and pathetically absurd coexistence humans have on this little blue planet.

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a must read

a harrowing book about the great war and it horror that all should read k

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Worthy of the great reputation it carries

This was an amazing story that reveals the horror of war and the deep companionship of soldiers.

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Good war story but narrator is too sing-song

I like the story but the narrator is to breathless and sing-song
Made it hard to listen too
No change in narration all the way through

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Frank Muller is a genius

An incredible, emotional performance of an amazing, important book. Also enjoyed Muller's reading of Moby Dick. Will now be seeking him out.

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Relevant 100 years later

This book is amazing and could have been written about soldiers in any war. The emotions of damaged souls is timeless and tragic.

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Narration is pretty sub-par

Narrator speaks in a growling voice as his default. It's constant. Really detracts from the story.