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Publisher's Summary

A handful of corporations and financial institutions command an ever-greater concentration of economic and political power in an assault against markets, democracy, and life. It's a "suicide economy," David Korten says, and it destroys the very foundations of its own existence.

The best-selling 1995 edition of When Corporations Rule the World helped launch a global resistance against corporate domination. In this 20th-anniversary edition, Korten shares insights from his personal experience as a participant in the growing movement for a new economy. A new introduction documents the further concentration of wealth and corporate power since 1995 and explores why our institutions resolutely resist even modest reform. A new conclusion chapter outlines high-leverage opportunities for breakthrough change.

©2015 The Living Economies Forum (P)2015 The Living Economies Forum

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    5 out of 5 stars
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amazing prophetic work...

it blows me away how 20 years ago he saw what has only become evident to most of us since the occupy movement. really great book...still completely relevant and offers suggestions to make a better world.

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It all makes sense. Good compilation.

A compilation of Corporatocracy vs common sense. Stay away if you are an MBA, as it is too philosophical and insightful.