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Publisher's Summary

Booker T. Washington, Builder of a Civilization by Emmett J. Scott, Lyman Beecher Stowe

It is not hyperbole to say that Booker T. Washington was a great American. For 20 years before his death, he had been the most useful, as well as the most distinguished, member of his race in the world, and one of the most useful, as well as one of the most distinguished, of American citizens of any race.

Eminent though his services were to the people of his own color, the White men of our Republic were almost as much indebted to him, both directly and indirectly. They were indebted to him directly, because of the work he did on behalf of industrial education for the Negro, thus giving impetus to the work for the industrial education of the White man, which is, at least, as necessary; and, moreover, every successful effort to turn the thoughts of the natural leaders of the Negro race into the fields of business endeavor, of agricultural effort, of every species of success in private life, is not only to their advantage but to the advantage of the White man, as tending to remove the friction and trouble that inevitably come throughout the South at this time in any Negro district where the Negroes turn for their advancement primarily to political life.

The indirect indebtedness of the White race to Booker T. Washington is due to the simple fact that here in America we are all, in the end, going up or down together; and therefore, in the long run, the man who makes a substantial contribution toward uplifting any part of the community has helped to uplift all of the community. Wherever in our land the Negro remains uneducated, and liable to criminal suggestion, it is absolutely certain that the Whites will themselves tend to tread the paths of barbarism; and wherever we find people of color as a whole engaged in successful work to better themselves, and respecting both themselves and others, there we shall also find the tone of the White community high.

©1918 Doubleday (P)2020 Legacy Audio Books

What listeners say about Booker T. Washington

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Focuses on Washington's influence on his race

This book focuses on Booker T Washington mainly as the founder and director of Tuskegee Institute in Alabama in the early 1900’s. He was a huge proponent of education and traveled around drumming up support for the school and rounding up students to attend. He was considered a Moses for the black people of his time. It has been said of him that he was not so much conducting a school as educating a race. He believed that character was of utmost importance and also instilled in the students the virtues of hard work, simplicity, politeness, persistence, determination, and being economical. He also made sure the students learned manners and personal hygiene as well.

Other biographical elements of Mr. Washington’s life are also revealed but this is not a comprehensive work on his life.

Narrator’s voice is well suited for this project.

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Booker T. Washington

This was an excellent book.It does not give much about Mr. Washingtons early years.It spends time on his efforts to help his community.Through his schools and scholarships he helped people learn about farming,math but mostly pigs.It seems if you have a clean house,a beautiful space to live and a pig you will go far.Many did.For those left behind,if he crossed their path,he made sure they were tended to.He was well educated and welcomed by even white folks,even Queens,who could learn just as much from him.He helped people help themselves.He was advising people up until the day he died. Andrew L. Barnes was a fine narrator. I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.'