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Publisher's Summary

Up from Slavery is the 1901 autobiography of Booker T. Washington detailing his slow and steady rise from a slave child during the Civil War, to the difficulties and obstacles he overcame to get an education at the new Hampton University, to his work establishing vocational schools - most notably the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama - to help Black people and other disadvantaged minorities learn useful, marketable skills and work to pull themselves, as a race, up by the bootstraps. 

He reflects on the generosity of both teachers and philanthropists who helped in educating Blacks and native Americans. He describes his efforts to instill manners, breeding, health and a feeling of dignity to students. His educational philosophy stresses combining academic subjects with learning a trade (something which is reminiscent of the educational theories of John Ruskin). Washington explained that the integration of practical subjects is partly designed to reassure the white community as to the usefulness of educating Black people.

Public Domain (P)2006 Legacy Audio Books, Inc.

What listeners say about Up from Slavery

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The Perfect Reader

What made the experience of listening to Up from Slavery the most enjoyable?

I tried listening to the free version of this book on Librevox. While I have enjoyed other audio books from that source, this one was painful. The voice just didn't match the book, and the reader wasn't quite fluent in English. Hearing Andrew Barnes' reading of this book in the sample was what made me get an Audible membership.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Up from Slavery?

When Booker T. Washington and the Lady Principle at the school were inspecting rooms, they found a room where three girls, new from the country were sharing one toothbush. This is just one example of Washington's vivid descriptions of the deep poverty in the south.

What does Andrew L. Barnes bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Andrew L. Barnes has the perfect voice for this book. His reading voice is dignified yet grounded in a combination of humility and confidence with just the right touch of wry humor. He is so good that it's hard to remember that the book is not being read by Booker T. Washington himself.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes, but I couldn't because life requires that grown ups do things.

Any additional comments?

Andrew L. Barnes is so good that I kinda want to go through Audible and just listen to all the books he reads.

6 people found this helpful

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A great inspired story.

very inspiring and up lifting. I readi this book as a youth and didn't understand nor enjoy the true meaning of the book. Now older I truly appreciate this work.

3 people found this helpful

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Conservative white guy and I LOVED IT!! Pass it along.

I’ll start by saying I’m a conservative and in an effort to find examples of good men I started this book. It was recommended by Larry Elder. I finished it in 3 days. Some of life at the time Mr. Washington describes sounds just like present day. The whole book is inspirational and the first half held many of the quotes that highlight his strong character. This man truly had nothing and came up out of it. He doesn’t make excuses or have any self pity. He worked hard, kept the fire lit and stayed humble most of all. The effort Mr. Washington put into educating the black community changed the world for the better. I can say with 100% certainty that he is one of the greatest men that have walked the earth. Booker T. Washington’s name and story should be know by every man of every race now more than ever.

2 people found this helpful

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Please Read

Just wow. This book is really good. I bought it because my class was learning about Booker T. Washington vs. W.E.B Dubois debate. (I'm college). I am pointing out in college because there is virtually no public school education on the current social issues that have been derived from past injustices. I personally am angered by the lack of proper public school education in History for all American children.
This is not past people. If you read this book and think a little. It is perfectly clear about all the social issue's that create stereotypes and current severe issue's. Too many people do not know what they do not know. Meaning they are not looking for a solution because they do not know where the problem is derived from. Therefore, people are making wrong assumptions about all situations. The truth is being hidden from our mainstream society. How can people come together and make changes when most people's view points of the past are wrongly taught. To build upon lies by leaving out information about the entire truth has caused many problems in today's society. Once again, not being taught about all of the past is being taught a lie.

This man is the most prominent African American in the late 19th- early 20th century. However, I never even heard his name before my college class in African American History. Not American, not World History. African American history . A college class with only 6 students. This needs to change!

2 people found this helpful

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Up From Slavery

An excellent historical account of educational beginnings in America. A worthy read or listening that should be mandatory in school.

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Awesome read!

I was tremendously impressed by this story hoping to return to this excellence of beliefs!

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Up from Slavery

I wish I had read this years ago. Brilliant man and a bringer of “Peace on Earth and Goodwill to all”.

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Awesome! Great read for blacks and whites of today

One of many 3 black minds of the early 19th century. Understanding and overcoming obstacles being committed is a Testament of the black soul.

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A Must Read

Please read this book. It is an important piece missing from what is taught in today’s history.

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Great biography, terrible reader

Any additional comments?

The voice narration has inconsistent quality and actually changes dramatically somewhere in the middle of the recording. Off setting and makes listening to the story of such a great man difficult.