• Ageless

  • The New Science of Getting Older Without Getting Old
  • By: Andrew Steele
  • Narrated by: Andrew Steele
  • Length: 9 hrs and 47 mins
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars (148 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

"A fascinating look at how scientists are working to help doctors treat the aging process itself, helping us all to lead longer, healthier lives.” (Sanjay Gupta, MD)

Aging - not cancer, not heart disease - is the underlying cause of most human death and suffering. The same cascade of biological changes that renders us wrinkled and gray also opens the door to dementia and disease. We work furiously to conquer each individual disease, but we never think to ask: Is aging itself necessary? Nature tells us it is not: There are tortoises and salamanders who are spry into old age and whose risk of dying is the same no matter how old they are, a phenomenon known as “biological immortality.” In Ageless, Andrew Steelecharts the astounding progress science has made in recent years to secure the same for humans: to help us become old without getting frail, to live longer without ill health or disease.

©2020 Andrew Steele (P)2020 Random House Audio

Critic Reviews

“During medical school we were taught that aging is a natural process and that people can simply die of old age. The thinking was that age wasn’t just a turning of the clock but an accumulation of mutations, cancer, arthritis, heart disease and dementia. Have you ever wondered, however, if it was possible to address those diseases not just individually, but collectively, by addressing the underlying process of aging itself. Sound far fetched? Well, It’s this audacious way of thinking that propelled Andrew Steele to write Ageless. In this new book, Steele highlights therapies being developed to stymie aging, from rebooting the immune system to repairing DNA to removing senescent cells. This is a fascinating look at how scientists are working to help doctors treat not just one disease at a time, but the aging process itself, helping us all to lead longer, healthier lives.” (Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Chief Medical Correspondent for CNN)

“Writing with the vim of a Bill Bryson and the technical knowledge of a scientist, Steele gives us a chance to grasp what’s at stake in this dazzling, daunting age where big data meets human biology." (The Independent)

“An optimistic exploration of aging... A diligent scientist, Steele does not ignore flops and fads... Good science in service of a convincing case that vast life extension is inevitable.” (Kirkus

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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

General overview of aging and aging research

As someone who has been following what I hope will turn out to be an effective longevity protocol for the past seven years, I am an avid consumer of all books related to longevity research. Ageless is a decent, uncomplicated overview of current research into ageing. The author begins by defining ageing, discussing which animals age slowly, which age quickly and why, how environment affects longevity, etc. Then he reviews current research, such as the use of senolytics and the TAME trials that are exploring the effect of metformin on longevity. Dr. Nir Barzilai's book Age Later does a fine job exploring that in greater depth. Unlike other books (particularly David Sinclair's) that explore potentially beneficial and promising supplements such as resveratrol, NMN, and NR as well as senolytics, Andrew Steele (who does a great job reading) says don't bother, wait for more definitive science, and in the meantime, don't drink, smoke, or eat to excess, sleep well and exercise. I would imagine most people interested in longevity already do all that, and frankly, I think some supplements do show genuine promise, so I was disappointed they were summarily dismissed. Perhaps Mr. Steels will prove to be right in the long run, though. All in all, Ageless provides a conservative overview of the topic of ageing, touches on some current research, but doesn't offer anything new or insightful on the topic, beyond a plea for more research dollars to be directed toward slowing or stopping ageing - which I agree should be done. If you're looking for more detailed information about current studies, read Dr. Sinclair's or Dr. Barzilai's books.

22 people found this helpful

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More General than Dr Sinclair's Book

At first, I thought this book would cover the same things as Dr Sinclair's book. There is some overlap, but I thought the books were different enough to warrant listening to both.

1 person found this helpful

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A very interesting listen

If you’re interested in why we age and possible treatments for aging, this is a wonderful book. It’s well read, has lots of interesting information, and is easy to understand. I think the author is a little optimistic about the time frame for anti aging treatments, but I hope I’m wrong there! I really enjoyed this book.

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Very well researched summary

I enjoyed this summary on the biology of aging. I myself am a scientist and can attest to how difficult it can be to collect this broad array of information, historical context, and insight while presenting it in an organized, thoughtful, and engaging way. This book really shines a spotlight on a lot of research topics that I will be interested in following in the coming years.

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Phenomenal

This isn’t a book that’s about hypothetical sci-fi but practices that are happening today that will effect all of human kind forever. It’s definitely though provoking

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Excellent, albeit technically complex in parts

Very convincing arguments for increased and rapid funding for biogerontology. Technically thorough, yet with occasional, well placed touches of humour.

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Thought provoking

Few real answers but still a good book. Hopefully more people will push for more funding on research into aging .

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Disappointed

There is nothing new here and nothing to be done about aging!!
If there is it’s not in this book

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Uo to date; informative

Although the advances are substancial the recommendations hasn’t changed for years.
Nothing new under the sun

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this really opened my eyes to a hidden revolution

the "story" was well told, despite occasionally being laden with very technical language. it's worth becoming aware of the mindset where aging is considered a disease, that can be cured, rather than a consequence of time passing.