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A Study in Scarlet

Narrated by: Walter Covell
Length: 3 hrs and 59 mins
3.5 out of 5 stars (19 ratings)

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Editorial Reviews

The late Walter Covell, master audiobook performer, brings his rich catalogue of voices to this stellar performance of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s A Study in Scarlet. In 1886, 27-year-old Doyle wrote a novel that introduced the characters of Sherlock Holmes, consulting detective, and his friend and colleague, Dr. Watson, to the public. That novel is here presented in audiobook form.

Taking the listener on an expedition from Scotland Yard to the Mormon Territory in young America, the novel also introduces the "Baker Street Irregulars" and the magnifying glass that was Holmes’ trademark. Three novels and over 50 short stories later, Holmes, Watson, and that magnifying glass are synonymous with crime-solving through deductive reasoning. Listener, A Study in Scarlet is the original.

Publisher's Summary

This is the very first Sherlock Holmes novel, published in 1887. In it, Holmes and Watson meet for the first time. It is a fascinating and exciting tale of kidnapping and murder. The detective and the doctor are immediately in fine form as Holmes plucks the solution to the mystery from the heart of Victorian London.
Public Domain (P)1980 Jimcin Recordings

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    2 out of 5 stars
  • Brian
  • Cordova, TN, USA
  • 06-16-06

Difficult narration

This is a great story, obviously, as the introduction between Watson and Holmes is established as roommates who grow to know one another and enter into their first great mystery. The low ranking therefore has little to do with the novel, but that of Watson's narrator who, although full of character, belies the voice of what our minds tell us he should be, and bumbles at too quickly a pace to enjoy a fireside mystery.

2 of 6 people found this review helpful