Showing results by author "Scientific American"

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    • Scientific American, February 2014

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2

    "The Proton Radius Problem": Scientists may be witnessing the signs of a whole new realm of physics. "Remembrance of All Things Past": Some people can recall details from their distant past as if the events happened yesterday. "An Indirect Way to Tame Cancer": Researchers are fighting cells and a material called the matrix in an effort to combat cancer. "Mind Games": Video games could transform education.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, February 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 35 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    In this issue: "The Exercise Paradox": Studies of how the human engine burns calories help to explain why physical activity does little to control weight. "Pop Goes the Universe": The latest astrophysical measurements, combined with theoretical problems, cast doubt on the long-cherished inflationary theory of the early cosmos and suggest we need new ideas. "High-Flying Microbes": Aerial drones and chaos theory help researchers explore the many ways that microorganisms spread havoc around the world. "Deep-Space Deal Breaker".

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, February 2013

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 23 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
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      0 out of 5 stars 0
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      0 out of 5 stars 0

    "Brain Cells for Grandmother": Sets of cells encode concepts in the brain. "Secrets of Primitive Meteorites": Primitive meteorites are helping to give us a better understanding of what our area of outer space once looked like. "Shattered Ancestry": Fragmented skeletons have upended ideas about the earliest humans. "The Myth of Antioxidants": The growing evidence that has cast doubt on the popular belief that oxidative damage causes aging.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Nanotech

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this special issue, Scientific American looks at nanotechnology. What is this science of "small" technology and manipulation at the tiniest scale? What promises does it hold for electronics, robotics, and more? How much of it is hype?

    Regular price: $5.95

    • Human Evolution

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 3 hrs and 9 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 80
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 19
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 19

    Reading the cracked brown fragments of fossils and sequences of DNA, scientists have found clues that the story of human origins has more convolutions than previously thought. The account of our shared human heritage now includes more controversial plot twists and mysteries. Was the remarkable seven-million-year-old skull found in July 2002 in Chad really one of our first forebears, or a distant dead-end cousin with precociously evolved features?

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Excellent, informative, concise

    • By Anderson on 11-20-10

    Regular price: $5.95

    • Space Wars

    • Scientific American
    • By: Theresa Hitchens, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 27 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 6
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 5
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 5

    Recent pronouncements and actions by the U.S. and China threaten to ignite a new arms race in space that would be contrary to everyone's interests. Learn more in this article, "Space Wars", from the March 2008 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • The Science of Persuasion

    • Scientific American
    • By: Robert Cialdini, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 21 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 161
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 91
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 88

    From the pages of Scientific American magazine: "The Science of Persuasion" reveals how sales people and politicians, as well as friends and family, get others to agree to what they want.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Direct and to the point

    • By Hammy on 09-09-08

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Why We Eat

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 45 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 26
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 12
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 11

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven fascinating articles. First, a look at the psychology of food. Then, you'll learn how a rare disorder is offering new insights into the nature of pain, and how troubled teenagers don't necessarily have immature brains. Also, there's promise for damaged or diseased brains, as they could soon get a boost from prosthetic implants. Plus, there are surprising new findings that hint that lithium may offer hope as a treatment for neurological ailments.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Readable scientific data and results

    • By Deborah on 02-25-08

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Time

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 47 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 64
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 13
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 13

    This special edition of Scientific American contains six articles full of remarkable insights into the inner workings of your body and your mind. How does your biological clock keep you running? How does your brain make chronological sense of your experiences and memories? You'll also hear how scientists are striving to understand time, from its very origins to the possibility of a time machine. And, you'll get a fascinating history of the timepiece.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • Interesting and Informative

    • By Barry J. Marshall on 01-31-08

    Regular price: $5.95

    • Scientific American, June 2009

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 16 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 4
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    "Improbable Planets": Astronomers are finding planets where there were not supposed to be any. "The Price of Silent Mutations": Small changes to DNA are proving to be big factors in human diseases, evolution and biotechnology. "The Taming of the Cat": Genetic and archaeological findings suggest wildcats became house cats much earlier - and in a much different place.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, October 2005

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 31 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 10
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
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      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In the cover story, we'll hear about special genetic changes that enable scientists to trace human migrations over thousands of years. Also, we'll hear about the possibility of a "Cool Early Earth", bomb-sniffing sensors that may replace police dogs, the forgotten era of brain-stimulating chips, and new developments in the world of wi-fi Internet.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • The Mystery of Methane on Mars and Titan

    • Scientific American
    • By: Sushil K. Atreya, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 24 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 7
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 4

    The presence of methane in the atmospheres of Mars and Titan might mean there is unusual geologic activity going on. It might also be an indicator of life. Learn more in this article, "The Mystery of Methane on Mars and Titan", from the May 2007 edition of Scientific American.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Actually 24 minutes long

    • By Joel on 04-10-10

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Consciousness

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 2 hrs and 4 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 88
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 33
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 34

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven articles. The cover story deals with synesthesia, when senses blend together in the brain. Also in this issue: thrill seeking, intelligence drugs, power trips, first impressions, the winter blues and lastly better work through relaxation.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • Good Issue...

    • By Douglas on 03-13-11

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Why Migraines Strike

    • Scientific American
    • By: David W. Dodick, J. Jay Gargus, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 22 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 2

    Biologists have solved the mystery of one of our most misunderstood, poorly recognized, and inadequately treated medical disorders. This article was published in the August 2008 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • The Body Speaks

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 34
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 12
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 13

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains six articles. You will hear about exciting new advances in the early detection of autism, how people can be trained to recover their lost sense of smell, the special language skills that set humans apart from their fellow animals, and how the body speaks.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • So who is really in charge of the "Real World" ??

    • By T. Roberson on 12-29-16

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Scientific American, June 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 30 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    In this issue: "The Quantum Multiverse": A surprising connection between cosmology and quantum mechanics could unveil the secrets of space and time. "The Messy Truth about Weight Loss": Two decades of research confirm that weight loss is about burning more calories than you consume—but what you eat is more important than how much you exercise.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Are Aliens Among Us?

    • Scientific American
    • By: Paul Davies, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 26 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 23
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 10
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 8

    Scientists are searching for life forms on Earth that are radically different from all known organisms. Learn more in this article, "Are Aliens Among Us?", from the December 2007 edition of Scientific American.

    • 1 out of 5 stars
    • Are Aliens Among Us?: Scientific American "heh"

    • By pickle430 on 02-21-11

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Do Gays Have a Choice?

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Robert Epstein, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 16 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 52
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 27
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 26

    In this essay from the pages of Scientific American Mind magazine, "Do Gays Have A Choice?", psychologist Robert Epstein writes that science has a clear and surprising answer. This article originally appeared in the February/March 2006 issue.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Excellent Listen

    • By Me & My Girls on 01-13-15

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Criminal Mind

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 30
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 11
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 11

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains six fascinating articles, on topics such as why some people hear voices, what causes migraine headaches, why only humans cry, the possible uses of medicine for mental fatigue, and increased usage of brain scans.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • Best of this series so far...

    • By Douglas on 02-13-11

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Staying Young

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 2 hrs and 4 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 19
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3

    Merely accruing additional years beyond the biblical span of three score and 10 would be unwelcome if they just prolonged suffering from illness and infirmity. No, we want to live better, more youthful days while we're living longer. Diet, exercise and a lucky draw from the gene pool can take us only so far, however. That's where science comes in. In this special edition from Scientific American, you'll find firsthand reports from the researchers leading the efforts to understand the mechanisms of aging.

    Regular price: $5.95

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