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Scientific American

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  • The Science of Persuasion: Scientific American | Robert Cialdini,Scientific American

    The Science of Persuasion: Scientific American

    • UNABRIDGED (21 mins)
    • By Robert Cialdini, Scientific American
    • Narrated By Sal Giangrasso
    Overall
    (154)
    Performance
    (84)
    Story
    (81)

    From the pages of Scientific American magazine: "The Science of Persuasion" reveals how sales people and politicians, as well as friends and family, get others to agree to what they want.

    Hammy says: "Direct and to the point"
  • Memory, Fear & Anger: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    Memory, Fear & Anger: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 51 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (91)
    Performance
    (19)
    Story
    (21)

    The cover story reveals how painful, long-term memories might actually be erased with the use of drugs at just the right moment. Then, an article that asks a provocative question - can we cure fear? Following that, it's an examination of anger -- should you control your emotions or let them rip? Next, it's a look at the persistence of myths -- and their connection to the brain's biological needs. Our fifth article seeks to explode one myth -- about the value of self-esteem.

  • The Brain: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    The Brain: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (2 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (129)
    Performance
    (24)
    Story
    (23)

    Studying how the mind and brain work sounds like it ought to be about as futile as trying to grab handfuls of air. Yet psychology, neuroscience and related fields have made amazing progress. This special issue of Scientific American reviews just a sliver of the discoveries that investigators from around the globe have made about the workings of our inner lives. The breadth of subjects tracks the vastness of thought.

    Douglas says: "It was pretty good..."
  • The Science of Intuition: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    The Science of Intuition: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 44 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (36)
    Performance
    (11)
    Story
    (10)

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven fascinating articles. First, discover the science behind your gut instinct. You'll also learn how antidepressants designed for adults may be altering the brains of children. You'll hear about a growing body of research that's showing how working in groups can systematically enhance performance. There's also news about the connection between abnormal sleep patterns and disease, and a report on the science of speech.

  • Scientific American, October 2015 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, October 2015

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 26 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    In this issue: "Sleep on It!": Your nightly rest turns out to affect your mind and health more than anyone suspected. "Neutrinos at the Ends of the Earth": Dozens of particles from halfway across the universe have landed in the IceCube experiment at the South Pole. These messengers could help answers some long-standing cosmic conundrums. "The Fat Gene": The genetic mutation in prehistoric apes may underlie today's pandemic of obesity and diabetes. "Stars of the Dead": Mysterious tables of astronomical information have been found in 4,000-year-old coffins. What in the world was their purpose?

  • Inner Vision: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    Inner Vision: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 32 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (28)
    Performance
    (5)
    Story
    (5)

    The cover story, "Picture This," explains that how our brains create images may determine how we think. Also in this edition, an examination of whether animals truly have feelings; a look at the controversial issue, "Do Gays Have a Choice?;" how mental exercises with neurofeedback may ease symptoms of Attention Deficit Disorder; new research on Parkinson's Disease; why we agonize over making choices; and the amazing ways our brains identify celebrities (or anyone else).

  • Scientific American, January 2004 |  Scientific American

    Scientific American, January 2004

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 57 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    This month's cover story, "Loop Quantum Gravity" takes a closer look at the atoms of space and time. Also in this issue of Scientific American for January 2004: radio-frequency identification tags stand poised to automate many aspects of our lives, decoding schizophrenia, a look at how men and woman lived in one of the largest Neolithic settlement, and more.

    Franz says: "Great concept, even better description!"
  • September 2017 | Scientific American

    September 2017

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 17 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    In this issue: "Promiscuous Men, Chaste Women and Other Gender Myths": The notion that behavioral differences between the sexes are innate and immutable does not hold up under scrutiny. "Is there a 'Female' Brain?": The debate over whether men and women have meaningfully different brains could have profound implications for health and personal identity. "When Sex and Gender Collide": Studies of transgender kids are revealing fascinating insights about gender in the brain. "Not Just for Men": Researchers must dig deeper into gender differences before they can provide better treatments.

  • Consciousness: Scientific American Mind |  Scientific American

    Consciousness: Scientific American Mind

    • HIGHLIGHTS (2 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (86)
    Performance
    (33)
    Story
    (34)

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven articles. The cover story deals with synesthesia, when senses blend together in the brain. Also in this issue: thrill seeking, intelligence drugs, power trips, first impressions, the winter blues and lastly better work through relaxation.

    Douglas says: "Good Issue..."
  • Five Essential Things to Do in Space: Scientific American | George Musser,Scientific American

    Five Essential Things to Do in Space: Scientific American

    • UNABRIDGED (23 mins)
    • By George Musser, Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
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    (8)
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    Planetary scientists have laid out five goals for exploring the solar system: monitor the Earth's climate, defend against asteroids, seek out new life, explain the genesis of planets, and leave the solar system. Learn more in this article, "To the Moon and Beyond", from the October 2007 edition of Scientific American.

  • Sex and the Secret Nerve: Scientific American Mind | Scientific American

    Sex and the Secret Nerve: Scientific American Mind

    • ABRIDGED (1 hr and 45 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (39)
    Performance
    (10)
    Story
    (11)

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains six fascinating articles on topics that deal with human behavior. You'll hear about the future of online dating, the continuing mystery of acupuncture, what home really means, how to be happy, and why some people are obsessed with...garbage.

    Daníel says: "Not what i thougt"
  • Eating to Live: Scientific American Reports |  Scientific American

    Eating to Live: Scientific American Reports

    • HIGHLIGHTS (2 hrs and 19 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (34)
    Performance
    (9)
    Story
    (8)

    This edition of Scientific American Reports contains seven articles. You'll hear about genetically modified foods, how nutrition has changed from the past and what it will look like in the future, how cutting calories may prolong youthful vigor into old age, and just how detrimental to health obesity is.

    Justin says: "Good nutritional book, Basics, future, present"
  • Scientific American, June 2015 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, June 2015

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 33 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
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    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    In this issue: "The Amazing Teen Brain": Rapidly changing wiring leads to mental agility – and risky behavior. "All the Light There Ever Was": Galaxies in every corner of the universe have been sending out photons, or light particles, since nearly the beginning of time. Astronomers are now beginning to read this extragalactic background light. "Cells on Fire": A newly discovered structure in cells underlies inflammation wherever it occurs—an insight that may lead to new treatments for ailments as diverse as atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's and fatty liver disease. "Birth of a Rocket": Is NASA's Space Launch System a flying piece of congressional pork or our best shot at getting humans to deep space?

  • Scientific American, January 2014 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, January 2014

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 34 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (1)
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    (1)
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    (1)

    "Our Unconscious Mind": Unconscious impulses and desires impel what we think and do in ways Freud never dreamed of. "The Search for Life on Faraway Moons": Moons orbiting distant exoplanets may account for most of the habitable locales in the galaxy. "Simulating a Living Cell": Biologists are forging a powerful new kind of tool for illuminating how life works. "The Ultimate X-ray Machine": A defunct cold war scheme for shooting down missiles is now creating exotic forms of matter.

  • Scientific American, February 2013 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, February 2013

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 23 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
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    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    "Brain Cells for Grandmother": Sets of cells encode concepts in the brain. "Secrets of Primitive Meteorites": Primitive meteorites are helping to give us a better understanding of what our area of outer space once looked like. "Shattered Ancestry": Fragmented skeletons have upended ideas about the earliest humans. "The Myth of Antioxidants": The growing evidence that has cast doubt on the popular belief that oxidative damage causes aging.

  • The Mystery of Methane on Mars and Titan: Scientific American | Sushil K. Atreya,Scientific American

    The Mystery of Methane on Mars and Titan: Scientific American

    • UNABRIDGED (24 mins)
    • By Sushil K. Atreya, Scientific American
    • Narrated By Sal Giangrasso
    Overall
    (7)
    Performance
    (4)
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    The presence of methane in the atmospheres of Mars and Titan might mean there is unusual geologic activity going on. It might also be an indicator of life. Learn more in this article, "The Mystery of Methane on Mars and Titan", from the May 2007 edition of Scientific American.

    Joel says: "Actually 24 minutes long"
  • Beyond Einstein: Scientific American Special Edition |  Scientific American

    Beyond Einstein: Scientific American Special Edition

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 55 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (3)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    This special edition of Scientific American features seven stories about Albert Einstein and his theories. The articles examine how Einstein's theories changed the world and continue to influence modern science and technology.

  • Scientific American, February 2014 | Scientific American

    Scientific American, February 2014

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 26 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    "The Proton Radius Problem": Scientists may be witnessing the signs of a whole new realm of physics. "Remembrance of All Things Past": Some people can recall details from their distant past as if the events happened yesterday. "An Indirect Way to Tame Cancer": Researchers are fighting cells and a material called the matrix in an effort to combat cancer. "Mind Games": Video games could transform education.

  • How to Build a Time Machine: Scientific American | Paul Davies,Scientific American

    How to Build a Time Machine: Scientific American

    • UNABRIDGED (14 mins)
    • By Paul Davies, Scientific American
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (39)
    Performance
    (17)
    Story
    (17)

    It goes without saying that building a time machine wouldn't be easy. But according to author Paul Davies, it might actually be possible.

  • Human Evolution: Scientific American Special Edition |  Scientific American

    Human Evolution: Scientific American Special Edition

    • HIGHLIGHTS (3 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Scientific American
    • Narrated By uncredited
    Overall
    (78)
    Performance
    (17)
    Story
    (17)

    Reading the cracked brown fragments of fossils and sequences of DNA, scientists have found clues that the story of human origins has more convolutions than previously thought. The account of our shared human heritage now includes more controversial plot twists and mysteries. Was the remarkable seven-million-year-old skull found in July 2002 in Chad really one of our first forebears, or a distant dead-end cousin with precociously evolved features?

    Anderson says: "Excellent, informative, concise"
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