Showing results by author "Scientific American"

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    • Scientific American, February 2013

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 23 mins
    • Highlights
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    "Brain Cells for Grandmother": Sets of cells encode concepts in the brain. "Secrets of Primitive Meteorites": Primitive meteorites are helping to give us a better understanding of what our area of outer space once looked like. "Shattered Ancestry": Fragmented skeletons have upended ideas about the earliest humans. "The Myth of Antioxidants": The growing evidence that has cast doubt on the popular belief that oxidative damage causes aging.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, February 2014

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2

    "The Proton Radius Problem": Scientists may be witnessing the signs of a whole new realm of physics. "Remembrance of All Things Past": Some people can recall details from their distant past as if the events happened yesterday. "An Indirect Way to Tame Cancer": Researchers are fighting cells and a material called the matrix in an effort to combat cancer. "Mind Games": Video games could transform education.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Can HIV Be Cured?

    • Scientific American
    • By: Mario Stevenson, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 18 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 6
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3

    Researchers may be able to eliminate HIV from the body by flushing the virus out of its hiding places. This article was published in the November 2008 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Why We Kiss

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 28 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 32
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 13
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 13

    You'll hear how research is revealing a hidden complexity to the simple act of kissing.You'll find out how our perception of time varies by situation.You'll learn how, in the past three generations, increasing numbers of Americans have been prescribed antidepressants - and no other mental health care. You'll discover how specific genes are being found to contribute to human personality traits, like anxiety, curiosity, and impulsive violence. And you'll learn about therapy for postpartum depression, which weakens the developing bonds between mother and child.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • Interesting

    • By Douglas on 06-11-12

    Regular price: $3.95

    • The Science of Persuasion

    • Scientific American
    • By: Robert Cialdini, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 21 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 161
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 91
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 88

    From the pages of Scientific American magazine: "The Science of Persuasion" reveals how sales people and politicians, as well as friends and family, get others to agree to what they want.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Direct and to the point

    • By Hammy on 09-09-08

    Regular price: $1.95

    • A Need For New Warheads?

    • Scientific American
    • By: David Biello, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 23 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      2.5 out of 5 stars 4
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
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    Countries are altering their nuclear arsenals, prompting the U.S. to refurbish its own warheads. America's proposal to build the first new nuclear warhead in two decades is rasing a host of questions. Learn more in this article, "A Need For New Warheads?", from the November 2007 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Dinosaurs

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 2 hrs and 55 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 32
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 14
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 13

    First, hear about fish-shaped reptiles that thrived in the oceans while dinosaurs ruled the land. Then, learn about the evolutionary history of whales, the mammals that conquered the seas. The most famous of all dinosaurs, Tyrannosaurus Rex, gets a fresh look as scientists re-examine fossil evidence for clues as to the tyrannosaur¿s actual behavior. Also, learn about some ancient Australian marsupials that were as ferocious as they were bizarre. Then, "Which Came First, the Feather or the Bird?", and more.

    Regular price: $5.95

    • Scientific American, February 2001

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 45 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 1
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      0 out of 5 stars 0
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      0 out of 5 stars 0

    "Are We Almost Tapped Out?" Scientific American offers a series of stories about the state of the world's water supplies. A freshwater expert explains why clean water is a rare commodity for billions. Even when there is water for drinking, what about having enough for irrigation? Is the era of Edison's light coming to an end? Get the answers to these questions and more...

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Criminal Mind

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 30
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 11
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 11

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains six fascinating articles, on topics such as why some people hear voices, what causes migraine headaches, why only humans cry, the possible uses of medicine for mental fatigue, and increased usage of brain scans.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • Best of this series so far...

    • By Douglas on 02-13-11

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Creativity

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American Mind
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 34 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 123
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 24
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 24

    The cover story in this issue explains how creativity and brilliance arises in all of us. Then, we'll take a look at the latest theories behind the experience commonly known as 'deja-vu'. Also, we'll learn about a mental breakdown that causes apathy so extreme it could become deadly, as well as Capgras syndrome, a perception disorder that causes people to think their loved ones have been replaced by extraterrestrial body doubles.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Loved it

    • By Prospyros on 08-16-05

    Regular price: $5.95

    • Scientific American, April 2007

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 1 hr and 43 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
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      0 out of 5 stars 0
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    In the cover story, "The Promise of Plasmonics", a new technology squeezes electromagnetic waves into miniscule structures. It may yield super-fast computer chips, ultra-sensitive molecular detectors and perhaps even invisibility cloaks. Next, "Gassing up with Hydrogen". Researchers are exploring ways for fuel-cell vehicles to hold the hydrogen they need for long-distance travel. We'll also hear about a cure for rabies, and the survival of a Wisconsin teenager who contracted rabies.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • The Science of Intuition

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 44 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 37
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 12
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 11

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven fascinating articles. First, discover the science behind your gut instinct. You'll also learn how antidepressants designed for adults may be altering the brains of children. You'll hear about a growing body of research that's showing how working in groups can systematically enhance performance. There's also news about the connection between abnormal sleep patterns and disease, and a report on the science of speech.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Scientific American, June 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 30 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    In this issue: "The Quantum Multiverse": A surprising connection between cosmology and quantum mechanics could unveil the secrets of space and time. "The Messy Truth about Weight Loss": Two decades of research confirm that weight loss is about burning more calories than you consume—but what you eat is more important than how much you exercise.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, February 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 35 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    In this issue: "The Exercise Paradox": Studies of how the human engine burns calories help to explain why physical activity does little to control weight. "Pop Goes the Universe": The latest astrophysical measurements, combined with theoretical problems, cast doubt on the long-cherished inflationary theory of the early cosmos and suggest we need new ideas. "High-Flying Microbes": Aerial drones and chaos theory help researchers explore the many ways that microorganisms spread havoc around the world. "Deep-Space Deal Breaker".

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Eating to Live

    • Scientific American Reports
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 2 hrs and 19 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 36
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 11
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 10

    This edition of Scientific American Reports contains seven articles. You'll hear about genetically modified foods, how nutrition has changed from the past and what it will look like in the future, how cutting calories may prolong youthful vigor into old age, and just how detrimental to health obesity is.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • Good nutritional book, Basics, future, present

    • By Justin on 09-25-11

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Sex and the Secret Nerve

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 45 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 41
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 12
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 13

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains six fascinating articles on topics that deal with human behavior. You'll hear about the future of online dating, the continuing mystery of acupuncture, what home really means, how to be happy, and why some people are obsessed with...garbage.

    • 2 out of 5 stars
    • Not what i thougt

    • By Daníel on 05-20-11

    Regular price: $3.95

    • The Teen Brain

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 30 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 42
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 10
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 10

    In the cover story, "The Teen Brain: Hard at Work. No... Really!", science reveals the ongoing changes underlying adolescent behavior. Next, you'll hear how researchers are achieving amazing results treating severely depressed patients by implanting an electrode in the brain. Then, you'll get some insights into why some people turn violent, and why some faint at the sight of blood.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Good

    • By Horace on 01-19-17

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Beyond Einstein

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 55 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    This special edition of Scientific American features seven stories about Albert Einstein and his theories. The articles examine how Einstein's theories changed the world and continue to influence modern science and technology.

    Regular price: $5.95

    • A Solar Grand Plan

    • Scientific American
    • By: Ken Zweibel, James Mason, Vasilis Fthenakis, and others
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 25 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 36
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 19
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 17

    There is an ambitious scheme in the works that would enable solar power to end U.S. dependence on foreign oil - as well as slash greenhouse gas emissions . Learn more in this article, "A Solar Grand Plan", from the January 2008 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • The Science of Persuasion

    • Scientific American
    • By: Robert Cialdini, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 21 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 8
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 7
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 7

    From the pages of Scientific American magazine: "The Science of Persuasion" reveals how sales people and politicians, as well as friends and family, get others to agree to what they want.

    Regular price: $1.95

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