Showing results by author "Scientific American"

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    • Scientific American, February 2001

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 43 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    "Are We Almost Tapped Out?" Scientific American offers a series of stories about the state of the world's water supplies. A freshwater expert explains why clean water is a rare commodity for billions. Even when there is water for drinking, what about having enough for irrigation? Is the era of Edison's light coming to an end? Get the answers to these questions and more...

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, February 2014

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2

    "The Proton Radius Problem": Scientists may be witnessing the signs of a whole new realm of physics. "Remembrance of All Things Past": Some people can recall details from their distant past as if the events happened yesterday. "An Indirect Way to Tame Cancer": Researchers are fighting cells and a material called the matrix in an effort to combat cancer. "Mind Games": Video games could transform education.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, February 2013

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 23 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
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      0 out of 5 stars 0
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    "Brain Cells for Grandmother": Sets of cells encode concepts in the brain. "Secrets of Primitive Meteorites": Primitive meteorites are helping to give us a better understanding of what our area of outer space once looked like. "Shattered Ancestry": Fragmented skeletons have upended ideas about the earliest humans. "The Myth of Antioxidants": The growing evidence that has cast doubt on the popular belief that oxidative damage causes aging.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, April 2015

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 36 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    "Burning Rings of Fire": "Firewalls" of particles may border black holes, confounding both general relativity and quantum mechanics. "Fishing for Billions": How a small group of visionaries are trying to feed China – and save the world’s oceans. "Conquer Yourself, Conquer the World": Self-control is not just a puritanical virtue. It is a key psychological trait that breeds success at work and play – and in overcoming life’s hardships. "How to Survive Cyberwar": Like it or not, we are all combatants in the fight to secure cyberspace.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, January 2015

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 36 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3

    "Better Than Earth": Planets quite different from our own may be the best homes for life in the future. "Will We Still Enjoy Pinot Noir?": Winegrowers are trying to preserve the flavor of your favorite reds and whites as climate change alters the compounds in grapes. "In Search of Sunken Treasure": Scientists are using exotic technologies to excavate underwater shipwrecks with the same precision as an archaeological dig. "A Weakness in Bacteria’s Fortress": Evolutionary biologists are trying to attack bacteria in a new way.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Staying Young

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 2 hrs and 4 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 20
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 4

    Merely accruing additional years beyond the biblical span of three score and 10 would be unwelcome if they just prolonged suffering from illness and infirmity. No, we want to live better, more youthful days while we're living longer. Diet, exercise and a lucky draw from the gene pool can take us only so far, however. That's where science comes in. In this special edition from Scientific American, you'll find firsthand reports from the researchers leading the efforts to understand the mechanisms of aging.

    Regular price: $5.95

    • The Science of Intuition

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 44 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 38
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 13
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 12

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven fascinating articles. First, discover the science behind your gut instinct. You'll also learn how antidepressants designed for adults may be altering the brains of children. You'll hear about a growing body of research that's showing how working in groups can systematically enhance performance. There's also news about the connection between abnormal sleep patterns and disease, and a report on the science of speech.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • A Solar Grand Plan

    • Scientific American
    • By: Ken Zweibel, James Mason, Vasilis Fthenakis, and others
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 25 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 36
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 19
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 17

    There is an ambitious scheme in the works that would enable solar power to end U.S. dependence on foreign oil - as well as slash greenhouse gas emissions . Learn more in this article, "A Solar Grand Plan", from the January 2008 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Human Evolution

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 3 hrs and 7 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 80
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 19
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 19

    Reading the cracked brown fragments of fossils and sequences of DNA, scientists have found clues that the story of human origins has more convolutions than previously thought. The account of our shared human heritage now includes more controversial plot twists and mysteries. Was the remarkable seven-million-year-old skull found in July 2002 in Chad really one of our first forebears, or a distant dead-end cousin with precociously evolved features?

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Excellent, informative, concise

    • By Anderson on 11-20-10

    Regular price: $5.95

    • The Mystery of Methane on Mars and Titan

    • Scientific American
    • By: Sushil K. Atreya, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 24 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 7
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 4

    The presence of methane in the atmospheres of Mars and Titan might mean there is unusual geologic activity going on. It might also be an indicator of life. Learn more in this article, "The Mystery of Methane on Mars and Titan", from the May 2007 edition of Scientific American.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Actually 24 minutes long

    • By Joel on 04-10-10

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Driving Toward Crashless Cars

    • Scientific American
    • By: Susana Martinez-Conde, Stephen L. Macknik, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 24 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 2

    Next-generation automotive safety technology could give us vehicles that are difficult to crash � and eventually may not need drivers at all. This article was published in the December 2008 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Burnout

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 15 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 64
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 14
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 15

    This issue of Scientific American Mind contains six fascinating articles. In the cover story, "Burned Out," you'll find out that if you're feeling overwhelmed by the demands of your job, you're definitely not alone. You'll also hear about new research that finds older workers are not necessarily slower than younger workers, and they often make fewer errors; you'll go inside the extraordinary memory of Kim Peek, the savant who was the inspiration for Rain Man; and more.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Five Essential Things to Do in Space

    • Scientific American
    • By: George Musser, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 23 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 13
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 9
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 10

    Planetary scientists have laid out five goals for exploring the solar system: monitor the Earth's climate, defend against asteroids, seek out new life, explain the genesis of planets, and leave the solar system. Learn more in this article, "To the Moon and Beyond", from the October 2007 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • To the Moon and Beyond

    • Scientific American
    • By: Charles Dingell, William Johns, Julie Kramer White, and others
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 21 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 7
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 4

    Humans are returning to the moon. This time, the plan is to stay a while. Learn more in this article, "To the Moon and Beyond", from the October 2007 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • New Insights About Leadership

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 54 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 22
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 4

    This edition includes six fascinating articles. You'll learn the secrets of effective leadership and hear how language influences our choices - from foods we eat to the laws we support. Also, discover how experts are finding out how acts of violence in schools can be predicted. Then, find out how the brain balances social concerns with economic decisions. Next, learn about the two to three percent of the population that can't recognize faces. Finally, hear why students are dropping out of college.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Consciousness

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 2 hrs and 3 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 89
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 34
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 35

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven articles. The cover story deals with synesthesia, when senses blend together in the brain. Also in this issue: thrill seeking, intelligence drugs, power trips, first impressions, the winter blues and lastly better work through relaxation.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • Good Issue...

    • By Douglas on 03-13-11

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Why Migraines Strike

    • Scientific American
    • By: David W. Dodick, J. Jay Gargus, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 23 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 36
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 21
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 23

    Biologists have solved the mystery of one of our most misunderstood, poorly recognized, and inadequately treated medical disorders. This article was published in the August 2008 edition of Scientific American.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • What we know -- and don't know -- about migraines.

    • By Kestrel on 06-10-16

    Regular price: $1.95

    • August 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 47 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    In this issue: "Life Springs": Deep oceans were thought to hold life's origins. New evidence points instead to an active volcanic landscape. "Building a Better Harvest": Scientists are learning to manipulate the complex conversation that plants have with microbes, pests, nutrients, and other elements in hopes of averting a future famine. "Talking to Ourselves": Studies of the conversations people have with themselves open a window on the hidden working of the mind. "Requiem for the Vaquita": What the demise of a small Mexican porpoise tells us about extinction in the 21st century.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Do Gays Have a Choice?

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Robert Epstein, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 16 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 52
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 27
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 26

    In this essay from the pages of Scientific American Mind magazine, "Do Gays Have A Choice?", psychologist Robert Epstein writes that science has a clear and surprising answer. This article originally appeared in the February/March 2006 issue.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Excellent Listen

    • By Me & My Girls on 01-13-15

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Gaining Ground on Breast Cancer

    • Scientific American
    • By: Francisco Esteva, Gabriel Hortobagyi, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 25 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    The newest targeted therapies are helping doctors to tailor increasingly effective treatments to individual patients. This article was published in the June 2008 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: $1.95

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