Showing results by author "Scientific American"

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    • Scientific American, February 2014

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2

    "The Proton Radius Problem": Scientists may be witnessing the signs of a whole new realm of physics. "Remembrance of All Things Past": Some people can recall details from their distant past as if the events happened yesterday. "An Indirect Way to Tame Cancer": Researchers are fighting cells and a material called the matrix in an effort to combat cancer. "Mind Games": Video games could transform education.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, February 2013

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 23 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
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      0 out of 5 stars 0
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      0 out of 5 stars 0

    "Brain Cells for Grandmother": Sets of cells encode concepts in the brain. "Secrets of Primitive Meteorites": Primitive meteorites are helping to give us a better understanding of what our area of outer space once looked like. "Shattered Ancestry": Fragmented skeletons have upended ideas about the earliest humans. "The Myth of Antioxidants": The growing evidence that has cast doubt on the popular belief that oxidative damage causes aging.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, February 2001

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 43 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
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      0 out of 5 stars 0

    "Are We Almost Tapped Out?" Scientific American offers a series of stories about the state of the world's water supplies. A freshwater expert explains why clean water is a rare commodity for billions. Even when there is water for drinking, what about having enough for irrigation? Is the era of Edison's light coming to an end? Get the answers to these questions and more...

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, January 2015

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 36 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3

    "Better Than Earth": Planets quite different from our own may be the best homes for life in the future. "Will We Still Enjoy Pinot Noir?": Winegrowers are trying to preserve the flavor of your favorite reds and whites as climate change alters the compounds in grapes. "In Search of Sunken Treasure": Scientists are using exotic technologies to excavate underwater shipwrecks with the same precision as an archaeological dig. "A Weakness in Bacteria’s Fortress": Evolutionary biologists are trying to attack bacteria in a new way.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Why Migraines Strike

    • Scientific American
    • By: David W. Dodick, J. Jay Gargus, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 23 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 36
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 21
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 23

    Biologists have solved the mystery of one of our most misunderstood, poorly recognized, and inadequately treated medical disorders. This article was published in the August 2008 edition of Scientific American.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • What we know -- and don't know -- about migraines.

    • By Kestrel on 06-10-16

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Why We Eat

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 44 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 27
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 13
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 12

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven fascinating articles. First, a look at the psychology of food. Then, you'll learn how a rare disorder is offering new insights into the nature of pain, and how troubled teenagers don't necessarily have immature brains. Also, there's promise for damaged or diseased brains, as they could soon get a boost from prosthetic implants. Plus, there are surprising new findings that hint that lithium may offer hope as a treatment for neurological ailments.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Readable scientific data and results

    • By Deborah on 02-25-08

    Regular price: $3.95

    • How to Build a Time Machine

    • Scientific American
    • By: Paul Davies, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 14 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 8
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 7
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 7

    It goes without saying that building a time machine wouldn't be easy. But according to author Paul Davies, it might actually be possible.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • Very entertaining

    • By Jeanne on 06-17-16

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Warmer Oceans, Stronger Hurricanes

    • Scientific American
    • By: Kevin E. Trenberth, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 17 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 6
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    Evidence is mounting that global warming enhances a cyclone's damaging winds and flooding rains. Learn more in this article, "Warmer Oceans, Stronger Hurricanes", from the July 2007 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • The Science of Persuasion

    • Scientific American
    • By: Robert Cialdini, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 21 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 8
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 7
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 7

    From the pages of Scientific American magazine: "The Science of Persuasion" reveals how sales people and politicians, as well as friends and family, get others to agree to what they want.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Staying Young

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 2 hrs and 4 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 20
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 4

    Merely accruing additional years beyond the biblical span of three score and 10 would be unwelcome if they just prolonged suffering from illness and infirmity. No, we want to live better, more youthful days while we're living longer. Diet, exercise and a lucky draw from the gene pool can take us only so far, however. That's where science comes in. In this special edition from Scientific American, you'll find firsthand reports from the researchers leading the efforts to understand the mechanisms of aging.

    Regular price: $5.95

    • The Body Speaks

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 25 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 34
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 13
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 14

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains six articles. You will hear about exciting new advances in the early detection of autism, how people can be trained to recover their lost sense of smell, the special language skills that set humans apart from their fellow animals, and how the body speaks.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • So who is really in charge of the "Real World" ??

    • By T. Roberson on 12-29-16

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Creativity

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American Mind
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 33 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 126
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 26
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 26

    The cover story in this issue explains how creativity and brilliance arises in all of us. Then, we'll take a look at the latest theories behind the experience commonly known as 'deja-vu'. Also, we'll learn about a mental breakdown that causes apathy so extreme it could become deadly, as well as Capgras syndrome, a perception disorder that causes people to think their loved ones have been replaced by extraterrestrial body doubles.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Loved it

    • By Prospyros on 08-16-05

    Regular price: $5.95

    • The Neuroscience of Dance

    • Scientific American
    • By: Steven Brown, Lawrence M. Parsons, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 15 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 8
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3

    Recent brain-imaging studies reveal some of the complex neural choreography behind our ability to dance. This article was published in the July 2008 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • September 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 18 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    In this issue: "Promiscuous Men, Chaste Women and Other Gender Myths": The notion that behavioral differences between the sexes are innate and immutable does not hold up under scrutiny. "Is there a 'Female' Brain?": The debate over whether men and women have meaningfully different brains could have profound implications for health and personal identity. "When Sex and Gender Collide": Studies of transgender kids are revealing fascinating insights about gender in the brain. "Not Just for Men": Researchers must dig deeper into gender differences before they can provide better treatments.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Beyond Einstein

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 54 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 3
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      0 out of 5 stars 0
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      0 out of 5 stars 0

    This special edition of Scientific American features seven stories about Albert Einstein and his theories. The articles examine how Einstein's theories changed the world and continue to influence modern science and technology.

    Regular price: $5.95

    • Scientific American, February 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 35 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    In this issue: "The Exercise Paradox": Studies of how the human engine burns calories help to explain why physical activity does little to control weight. "Pop Goes the Universe": The latest astrophysical measurements, combined with theoretical problems, cast doubt on the long-cherished inflationary theory of the early cosmos and suggest we need new ideas. "High-Flying Microbes": Aerial drones and chaos theory help researchers explore the many ways that microorganisms spread havoc around the world. "Deep-Space Deal Breaker".

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Burnout

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 14 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 64
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 14
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 15

    This issue of Scientific American Mind contains six fascinating articles. In the cover story, "Burned Out," you'll find out that if you're feeling overwhelmed by the demands of your job, you're definitely not alone. You'll also hear about new research that finds older workers are not necessarily slower than younger workers, and they often make fewer errors; you'll go inside the extraordinary memory of Kim Peek, the savant who was the inspiration for Rain Man; and more.

    Regular price: $3.95

    • Scientific American, May 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 37 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
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      0 out of 5 stars 0
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      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue: "The New Origins of Technology": 3.3-million-year-old artifacts from Kenya upend the classic story of when and how humans became innovators. "Strange News from Another Star": Alien technology is probably not causing Boyajian's star to dim mysteriously. But alternative explanations are hard to come by. "Missing Links": Loss of some DNA during evolution may have helped create big brains and our male-female relationships. "Schizophrenia's Unyielding Mysteries": Gene studies were supposed to reveal the disorder's roots. That didn't happen. Now scientists are broadening the search.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • Scientific American, May 2008

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 48 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
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      0 out of 5 stars 0

    "The Chaotic Genesis of Planets", "Science 2.0: Is Open Access Science the Future?", "Regulating Evolution: How Gene Switches Make Life", "Hooked from the First Cigarette", and "Nuclear Fuel Recycling: More Trouble Than It's Worth".

    Regular price: $6.95

    • The Science of Intuition

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 43 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 40
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 15
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 14

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven fascinating articles. First, discover the science behind your gut instinct. You'll also learn how antidepressants designed for adults may be altering the brains of children. You'll hear about a growing body of research that's showing how working in groups can systematically enhance performance. There's also news about the connection between abnormal sleep patterns and disease, and a report on the science of speech.

    Regular price: $3.95

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