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Publisher's Summary

The mastermind behind Apple Computer sheds his low profile and steps forward to tell his story for the first time.

Before cell phones that fit in the palm of your hand and slim laptops that fit snugly into briefcases, computers were like strange, alien vending machines. They had cryptic switches, punch cards, and pages of encoded output. But in 1975, a young engineering wizard named Steve Wozniak had an idea: what if you combined computer circuitry with a regular typewriter keyboard and a video screen? The result was the first true personal computer, the Apple I, a widely affordable machine that anyone could understand and figure out how to use.

Wozniak's life before and after Apple is a "home-brew" mix of brilliant discovery and adventure, as an engineer, a concert promoter, a fifth-grade teacher, a philanthropist, and an irrepressible prankster. From the invention of the first personal computer to the rise of Apple as an industry giant, iWoz presents a no-holds-barred, rollicking, firsthand account of the humanist inventor who ignited the computer revolution.

©2006 Steve Wozniak (P)2006 Tantor Media, Inc.

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What listeners say about iWoz

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

Not Another Apple History!

If you are looking for a blow by blow history of Apple this is not it, which is refreshing. This book focuses on Steve Wozniak's life and what motivated him to design the first personal computer, the path that led him to that point and the path he took from that point. Steve Jobs is mentioned in the book but only sparingly where it contributes to Wozniak's narrative. Of course the book focuses on Steve's engineering life but also focuses on his relationships with his father, wives and children. Overall a very well rounded account of Steve's life and is a must read for any Apple fan, especially as a foil to the books on Steve Jobs.

13 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Best of the Best

iWoz is one of my favorite audible books of all time (on par with "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!"). Its very inspiring. I wish I could have listened to this 15 years ago while I was taking computer architecture and digital logic in college. Its nice to know about the people actually inventing and really doing the stuff you read about in textbooks.

18 people found this helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Interesting look at the early days of the p.c.

This is the memoirs of a computer engineer so the book has a lot of technical information. The author tells about growing up in Sunnyvale, California and working on creating or should I say designing a personal computer. He tells about his group of computer nerds, belonging to a computer club and the founding of Apple Computer Company. It was great to hear from Woz how many of his teachers had a positive effect on him. Helping him push ahead of his class in math and giving him self-confidence in his abilities. He also went into detail about the positive effect his father had in teaching him about physics and electronics and engineering starting at age 4. Woz says his father was an engineer. His mother encouraged and helped him with math from the first grade on. Woz states he entered every science fair all during his schooling and felt he learned a great deal from the experience.

Woz tells about his relationship with Steve Jobs and other people in his work group. Woz designed Apple I and the Apple II.

Despite the help of a co-writer, journalist Gina Smith, the book is difficult to read and is poorly written. The repetitions were what got to me. Woz says so much written about him is wrong so he just wanted to set the record straight.

The book provides an inside look at the building of Apple I and II and the founding of the Apple Company. The book is well worth the read if you are interested in the tech industry and the history of the personal computer. Patrick Lawler narrated the story.

8 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

quite a story

If everything I read in iWoz is true, the "other" Steve played a vital role in the development of personal computing. Clearly, the book gives Woz an opportunity to set the record straight on what he believes are inaccuracies told in other books about Apple. The story is also a great example of the value of team work, and the benefits of surrounding yourself with talented people.

6 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

iWoz you to read this book!

If you love Apple, engineering, technology, history, or a wonderful story - you will love this book. It offers great insight into how the Apple I and II came about - including all the inventions, designs, and experiences that lead up to these moments.

I enjoyed the book immensely and is a must for anyone who owned an Apple II and/or grew up during the early days of personal computers. It really brought back some memories.

Woz should be looked at as one of the top inventor / engineers of the 20th century. He truly was brilliant when it came to implementing elegant designs. Hats off to a man who appears to have lived his life his way!

This is a very entertaining book and found it well paced. Actually had a couple of parts that had me laughing or at least grinning. The couple of slow pieces are understandable given it is a true story.

If you ever remember having problems with OS7/8 ? the book contains the answer? not surprising who?s product caused the issue (even when it was not running).

15 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars

Loved It, Iron Eagle of Bios(plural, not system)

I came to understand a few years back that taste in subject matter is subjective. How much is my opinion really worth on: other people's opinions(meta-pinions), a performance, or anything else for that matter? If the answer is 2¢, read on... It was one of those stories that I was hanging on every word. Like when you tell your kids to go play in traffic, so you could stop rewinding a movie to hear what a character said. If I had to stop listening, I always rewound it 5 minutes just to ensure I remembered where I left off. I often set it on a chapter I already heard at bed time to fall asleep to, only to stay up half the night enjoying the content again. In my formative years(early 80's), I was lucky enough to have access to home computers. It shaped almost every aspect of my future. The content doesn't feel written, it flowed like he has told this story a thousand times. This should be a text book. It's filled with great: history, comp science definitions, how-to explanations, pen testing(phone systems), and marital advice. This manifesto(what you call a memoir from a guy with a beard) filled in gaps I didn't know I had.

2 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Very enjoyable!

I love the way this book is written. While listening, I can imagine myself talking to Woz on the phone as he relays these stories. The facts are presented in a story mode that make it difficult to turn off!

2 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

The Engineer’s Engineer

Steve Wozniak sets the record straight on many false facts about repeated Apple lore in this refreshing memoir. Unfettered by the drive of fame and fortune, Wozniak shows how he wanted to make good things and make people’s day better. Guided by the morals instilled by his father and support from teachers, Wozniak repeatedly proves that “doing the right thing,” even if it involves personal loss, is the best way to go. Even for a non-technical person, you will enjoy the enthusiasm of the eureka moments and the frustration of committee politics. Woz shares the most important lessons he has learned and hopes they will help anyone who has an idea because “the world needs more inventors.”

2 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

This book is fun and insightful!

I loved listening to this book.

It is a great story with so many insights especially in a world where working around the clock and grabbing every dollar that comes your way seems to be the only way to “succeed”.

Steve talks about real success and it is something that depends on what is important to you rather than impressive to others.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

Simple Genius

Steve Wozniak isn't a complicated man, as he'll tell you in this book. But through his genius, a ton of things we take for granted were his ideas. This is a great listen if you want to take yourself back to a time before the internet, the proliferation of personal computers and technology.

The Plus's: He really does a good job of re-creating a sense of wonder he felt as he designed the first modern personal computer. His positive attitude permeates the entire recording.

The Minus's: Lot's of engineer-speak. He does ramble on about the counter-culture of the sixties & the anti-governmental ideas. And there isn't very much about Apple Computers or Steve Jobbs here. You have to get half-way through it before he even gets to Apple.

All in all, a good read, but I would have liked a little more information about the early Apple years.

8 people found this helpful