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The Transition of Titus Crow

Cthulhu Mythos Series, Book 2
Narrated by: Simon Vance
Series: Titus Crow, Book 2
Length: 7 hrs and 33 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (92 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

A time-space chiller-thriller in the Lovecraft Tradition. This is the second novel in Brian Lumley's Cthulhu Mythos series.

©1975 Brian Lumley (P)2016 David N. Wilson

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  • C.T.
  • Ashland, Ky USA
  • 02-14-17

Even better than the regular book

The Transition of Titus Crow is a fascinating follow-up to the Burrowers Beneath but not one which is without controversy. Brian Lumley takes the titular character and sends him on a 70s psychadelic trip across the multiverse in a time-travelling coffin which effectively turns the entire thing into Doctor Who meets Lovecraft. This the kind of story where the protagonist becomes a cyborg, journeys to science fiction heaven, outwits Yog-Sothoth, and talks with Cthulhu's benevolent brother. It's a crazy-crazy book and I'm very glad to have read it but it's not without flaws. Even so, Simon Vance does an amazing job here and I recommend people pick it up. Just don't expect a traditional Lovecraft tale.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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NOT Lovecraftian Horror

While the “1st” installment in this series was relatively intriguing and maintained at least a modicum of the original spirit of Lovecraftian style horror (albeit through a primarily sci-fi lens), this installment is an utter departure and all in all tripe. The author took any adherence to the genre and tossed it to the side in favor of what I can only refer to as a 6-hour character masturbation session; yes the title suggests a focus, but not in such a jejune manner. The narrator’s dry performance (while somewhat acceptable for the first book) did not help when it came to finding any of this at all relatable and more so made me root for the main character’s downfall; the only madness in this book is my own after finishing it.

This book is less contemporary cosmic horror and more “Harry Potter in Space”.

If you want pappy sci-fi romance with a vaguely cosmic bend then maybe you’ll like this book, but if you are looking for a modern riff on Lovecraft’s Universe and/or bestiary, do not waste your time or money on this book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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broken audio file.

the audio file is broken from 00:12:30 - 0016:00. they say they are looking into it but we will see.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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nice continuation

good read, I never want to hear the word Ellipsis for a while. highly recommend not missing much when you listen to it.

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  • Stephen Arnott
  • 07-14-19

Enjoyable but messy.

Titus takes off in a Tardis-like clock and has numerous adventures in a surreal Lovecraftian universe. The pace is quite frantic and reminded me of an Edgar Rice Burroughs book. Overall a disappointment as I ultimately felt nothing really mattered. Titus would end up in a location that would be described in careful detail, then be whisked off somewhere else. Then the same would happen again and again and again. Titus is gradually transformed (hence the title) and we learn more of Lumley's lore of the Elder Gods, but by the end, I have to say I didn't really care that much. There's also a very annoying story segment where half the text has been destroyed, meaning the tale skips around like a scratched record. I won't be picking up Book 3.

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Profile Image for Mr D Jones
  • Mr D Jones
  • 02-11-18

Hated the deliberately broken narrative

The deliberate gaps in the story were too much. They just became annoying. I will continue with the series though.