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Publisher's Summary

In The Patient Will See You Now, Eric Topol, one of the nation's top physicians, examines what he calls medicine's "Gutenberg moment". Much as the printing press liberated knowledge from the control of an elite class, new technology is poised to democratize medicine. In this new era, patients will control their data and be emancipated from a paternalistic medical regime in which "the doctor knows best."

Mobile phones, apps, and attachments will literally put the lab and the ICU in our pockets. Computers will replace physicians for many diagnostic tasks, and enormous data sets will give us new means to attack conditions that have long been incurable. In spite of these benefits, the path forward will be complicated; some in the medical establishment will resist these changes, and digitized medicine will raise serious issues surrounding privacy. Nevertheless, the result - better, cheaper, and more humane health care for all - will be worth it.

©2015 Eric Topol (P)2015 Tantor

Critic Reviews

"Dr. Eric Topol is a pioneer of the medicine of the future and the future is now! Read this book and empower yourself for total well-being." ---Deepak Chopra

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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I began as a sceptic but now I'm convinced

As a medical school hopeful I regard this as one of the most inspiring books I've ever read/listened to. I began as a sceptic but am now convinced that democratized medicine is inevitable and worthwhile.

20 of 23 people found this review helpful

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  • Andy
  • Westport, CT, United States
  • 01-25-15

the future is here

Terrific overview of how technology available today, coupled with a mindset shift in clinician thinking, can go a long way towards improving health care for all.

14 of 16 people found this review helpful

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  • David
  • Wilmington, DE, USA
  • 04-23-15

Insightful and Visionary!

Eric Topol has done it again. This book is thoroughly researched and quite inspiring. The future of medicine described in great detail. A call to action

13 of 15 people found this review helpful

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  • PTA
  • Austin, TX
  • 01-07-15

Bold, innovative, and foward thinking!

If you could sum up The Patient Will See You Now in three words, what would they be?

Extremely insightful book! Dr Topol does a great job of illustrating the potential future of patient/doctor relationships. He uses many concrete example of different projects and products that are already making this change happen.

Who was your favorite character and why?

NA

Have you listened to any of Eric Michael Summerer’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

NA

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

the whole book is very insightful

16 of 19 people found this review helpful

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DOCTOR/PATIENT RELATIONSHIP

As is inferred by the title “The Patient Will See You Now”, Doctor Eric Topol foresees a substantive change in doctor/patient relationship in America. The change is partly foreseen as a consequence of technology but more fundamentally the change is a realization that doctors are service providers; not oracles or patriarchs.

Topol arrives at his conclusions about doctor/patient relationship by identifying technological potential of computerized medical records, data base availability, and algorithmic medical diagnosis. Judging from other doctors like Don Berwick, Barry Bittman, Thomas Goetz, and Atul Gawande, Topol is on to something.

Experiences American patients have with doctors are recounted in Topol’s book. One sees themselves in some of Topol's anecdotes. Doctors are not gods. They are human. They make mistakes. What Topol explains is that mistakes can be reduced with patient involvement in diagnosis and treatment.

Technology is handmaiden to improvement in human health. There are risks and rewards in technological change. The risks are loss of jobs, and diminished self-worth in the short run; in the long run, there is potential for genetic Armageddon from experimentation. The rewards are more leisure time, and improved health in the short run; in the long run, there is greater potential for human survival from genetic modification. Extensive record keeping and algorithmic computerization of human beings threaten the excesses of “1984” but, on the other hand, broadly available information offers opportunity for improvement of the human condition.

At times, Topol seems too optimistic; at other times, too pessimistic. Nonetheless, Topol offers something to think about.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Socialist bent but brilliant none the less

Eric appears to be a socialist so you'll view the advances that we have the opportunity to embrace through that lens. But the information is spectacular and his vision of the future for medicine is exciting even if I see its implementation from a radically different libertarian perspective.

24 of 30 people found this review helpful

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  • Wayne
  • Matthews, NC
  • 11-01-15

Optimistic outlook on the future of medical care

Eric Topol presents a very optimistic vision of the application of new technologies, especially digital, to making each of us the person primarily responsible for our own healthcare; the physician's role will be reduced. He focuses on the concept that each of us will have personal ownership of our personal medical data. The keys according to Topol include wide use of smartphones with apps and special sensors to measure a wide variety of medically relevant conditions including blood tests, a huge and very secure cloud to store our data, and super computers to analyze population and individual gnome data. He covers a wide range of other topics including the reduces use of hospitals. His summary is a move from autocratic to democratic medicine (bottom up rather than top down medicine).

I am impressed by the scope and vision of the book, but am concerned about the role of government. In two cases he is critical of the FDA approval process, but overall he is, I believe incorrectly, in favor of more legislation and more government involvement in healthcare markets. Nevertheless, despite his inappropriate leaning toward socialization, the information and forward leaning view in the book make it worthy of a five star rating.

The narration is excellent.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

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Textbook of future medicine

Would you listen to The Patient Will See You Now again? Why?

I will. Will use it as a textbook for my lecture.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Patient Will See You Now?

Great and balanced insights for both doctors and patients.

What about Eric Michael Summerer’s performance did you like?

Spotless.

11 of 15 people found this review helpful

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  • Kathy
  • Davis, CA, United States
  • 10-13-15

Future of Medicine--Clear, Concise, Mind Blowing!

Listen to this audiobook if you are wondering how the field of medicine in this country could be in the near future. Eric Topol, MD, certainly has the experience and credentials to make very valid predictions. Check out his Wiki if you don't believe me.

A few of the many surprising things he predicts are diagnosis, testing, and ongoing monitoring by use of Smart Phones, hospitals with no beds with homes being medically equipped instead, no need for doctor's office visits, good medical care for all socioeconomic groups (what a concept), and individualized medical care. This would include more patient input on their own medical care and choices of treatment by making all medical info available to the individual, such as test results and doctor notes.

This is a very brief summary that I have included above. There is so more I haven't mentioned. All of it fascinating!

Topoll's predictions are mind-blowing and something for us to look forward to and hope for, while fully acknowledging the medical profession's conservative stance and unwillingness toward change.

This is an important book and a great listen. It moves quickly and easily with a fine narration. Highly recommended.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Explains the author's view of the future of medici

Once you get past the paranoid view that so much in medicine is a conspiracy, the book does give a view of how technology can change health care. The author misses 2 key points that increase hospitalization costs: 1. US patients do not take personal responsability for their health -obesity, fast food, smoking, lack of exercise, etc 2. Hospitals have a gov't imposed mandate to care for anyone, regardless of ability to pay. This policy is a hidden tax on those who do pay or whose insurance pays.

41 of 65 people found this review helpful

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  • A
  • 02-04-15

Waste of time.

Could have been summarised in 5 mins. I did not find it as informative as I had hoped. Just my opinion.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 10-14-16

Inspiring look into the future of medicine

I loved the book, it was very well written and read.
Not all the points adressed in the book may develop as they are written here but it is certainly an interessting review of where healthcare is heading.