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Publisher's Summary

Wired magazine editor and best-selling author Chris Anderson takes you to the front lines of a new industrial revolution as today’s entrepreneurs, using open source design and 3-D printing, bring manufacturing to the desktop. In an age of custom-fabricated, do-it-yourself product design and creation, the collective potential of a million garage tinkerers and enthusiasts is about to be unleashed, driving a resurgence of American manufacturing. A generation of "Makers" using the Web’s innovation model will help drive the next big wave in the global economy, as the new technologies of digital design and rapid prototyping gives everyone the power to invent - creating "the long tail of things".

©2012 Chris Anderson (P)2012 Random House Audio

Critic Reviews

"Chris understands that the owners of the means of production get to decide what is produced. And now you're the owner. This book will change your life, whether you read it or not, so I suggest you get in early." (Seth Godin, best-selling author of Tribes and Purple Cow)
"A visionary preview of the next technological revolution. If you want to know where the future is headed, start here." (Tom Rath, author of StrengthsFinder 2.0)
"Makers is must read for understanding the transformative changes that are shaping, and will shape, the future of inventing." (Dan Ariely, author of Predictably Irrational and The Upside of Irrationality)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Story
  • Kenneth
  • LEESBURG, VA, United States
  • 12-03-12

Simple Story Evokes Complex Reaction

I've waited 4 ½ years for this book. I think of this as the third book in the trilogy: The Long Tail, Free, and now Makers. When Free came out I wrote that I thought that the next book would be about open source hardware. Now we know this was correct, but so much has happened in the intermediate 4 1/2 years that it now seems somewhat mundane. I was at the most recent Detroit Maker Fair and there were 30K people. The maker movement has serious momentum. If you’re unaware of the Makers this is an excellent introduction, but it may be kind of old news.

His argument for giving away the design but charging for hardware is unsettling. There seems to be an equally compelling argument for the reverse; that is, giving away the hardware and charging for the design. He’s in touch with what’s mostly working in 2012. However, it’s at odds with what worked in the past. I kept thinking about IBM and the PC. And no satisfying theory really justifies any choice of business model.

Finally, he argues that this is great for America and probably disastrous for China. Design will be all that’s left of manufacturing and America will own that. I agree. But the justification for this belief is far from satisfying. My reading of Christensen suggests that controlling the low end of the market allows you to move upscale market … The dynamics are complicated …

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Tony
  • KIRKWOOD, MISSOURI, United States
  • 12-02-12

Fantastic!

Where does Makers rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

A fantastic book about the present and future of design & manufacturing on the local level. Incredibly engaging book.

What other book might you compare Makers to and why?

Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson would be comparable regarding design & manufacturing.

Which scene was your favorite?

all

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

not relevant

Any additional comments?

I want to buy the hard copy now.

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Guide to Mind over Matter.

"There is no there, there" is a phrase that was sometimes used in describing cyberspace in the 1980's. The thought of a world of virtual things was uncomfortable for those us who were brought up in a world with black and white TV. However, we pushed the development of computers and communications where virtual things are commonplace.

Chris outlines the state of the virtual becoming real again, bits to atoms. It reminds me of the many books and articles produced in the late 80's about the changes that communications would bring. The speed and impact of those changes were under estimated. Perhaps we are underestimating the impact of the new Makers today.

Highly recommend this book for both engineers and Washington DC policy wonks who want to get a leg up on where we as creators are going.

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  • John
  • Nebraska
  • 10-27-12

Hobbyists out to make a dent in the universe

A well written book on the niche subject of making stuff using digital and 3D printing technologies. A likely read for hackers, people who like to tear things apart to find out how it works inside, people who want to make things with their computer, and aspirating product designers doing really cool stuff. Also, the author provides a good view into the manufacturing ways of the future (and its not just in China).

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  • Glenn
  • Richmond Hill, ON, Canada
  • 10-21-12

Another idea generating audio by Chris Anderson

Excellent introduction into the Maker movement. He thinks there will be a new industrial revolution caused by personal manufacturing which will be similar to what happened with the computer revolution. We are at the very beginning. His prediction that this new technology will bring jobs back from overseas is an encouraging one. He also applies his insights from his previous works Free and The Long Tail (both are must reads) to this topic.
Some great reviews are online.