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Publisher's Summary

Explore the physics behind the world of Star Wars, with engaging topics and accessible information that shows how we're closer than ever before to creating technology from the galaxy far, far away - perfect for every Star Wars fan!

Ever wish you could have your very own lightsaber like Luke Skywalker and Obi-Wan Kenobi? Or that you could fly through space at the speed of light like Han Solo and Poe Dameron?

Well, those ideas aren't as outlandish as you think.

In The Physics of Star Wars, you'll explore the mystical power of the Force using quantum mechanics, find out how much energy it would take for the Death Star or Starkiller Base to destroy a planet, and discover how we can potentially create our very own lightsabers. The fantastical world of Star Wars may become a reality!

©2017 Patrick Johnson (P)2017 Simon & Schuster, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Good for those with out a science background

The Physics of Star Wars was an enjoyable read. It was written on a level that most anyone could understand, so don't let the physics in the title scare you. Since I do have a science background, I was annoyed by the use of Imperial units rather than SI units. Hearing temperature in Fahrenheit and distances in miles was kind of shocking in a science book, but it is more understandable by the average American. One thing that annoyed me about the narration was that there were times that the author used abbreviations for the units (m for meter, s for second, etc.) and the narrator just say the letter made me cringe.