Regular price: $29.95

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

Perhaps it wasn't from our time, perhaps it wasn't even from our universe, but the arrival of the 300-kilometer long stone was the answer to humanity's desperate plea to end the threat of nuclear war. Inside the deep recesses of the stone lies Thistledown: the remnants of a human society, versed in English, Russian and Chinese. The artifacts of this familiar people foretell a great Death caused by the ravages of war, but the government and scientists are unable to decide how to use this knowledge. Deeper still within the stone is the Way. For some the Way means salvation from death, for others it is a parallel world where loved ones live again. But, unlike Thistledown, the Way is not entirely dead, and the inhabitants hold the knowledge of a present war, over a million miles away, using weapons far more deadly than any that mankind has ever conceived.

©1985 Greg Bear (P)2012 Audible, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.0 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    274
  • 4 Stars
    282
  • 3 Stars
    125
  • 2 Stars
    28
  • 1 Stars
    23

Performance

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    299
  • 4 Stars
    255
  • 3 Stars
    84
  • 2 Stars
    13
  • 1 Stars
    10

Story

  • 4.0 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    260
  • 4 Stars
    246
  • 3 Stars
    101
  • 2 Stars
    37
  • 1 Stars
    20
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • David
  • Halifax, NS, Canada
  • 03-17-13

Still holds up well

I first read Eon as a teenager, and was quite obsessed with its extremely detailed and imaginative worlds. I was curious to see if I'd still like it today, and I was pleased to find that it was just as engaging and mind-expanding as I'd remembered.

The most thrilling parts of the novel are the opening scenes, as the characters explore the multi-chambered Stone, gradually learning its secrets, and then travel further down the infinite Corridor; there's a tremendous sense of an journey toward greater and greater discovery. The final chapter is a brilliant twist that ends the novel perfectly with a beautiful reworking of its themes.

Of course, the novel's Cold War politics and its depictions of astronaut-soldiers in the year 2000 now seem extremely dated, but fortunately this is a novel about alternate universes, so one can simply pretend that the story takes place in a different universe than ours...

The human side of things isn't quite as good; Bear's handling of the romantic subplots is rather stilted and sometimes the characters seem a little too unflappable in the face of universe-changing events. But these aren't major problems, and there is often some emotional intensity in the scenes in which characters are yearning for home, or discovering that everything they knew was wrong.

I was briefly taken aback by the narrator's ridiculously manly voice (it's like being read to by Barry White), but I got used to it rapidly and he's very good at distinguishing the characters.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

I simply loved it.

If you could sum up Eon in three words, what would they be?

epic, near-future, space-adventure

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

yes, fortunately it's long enough that it lasted me a few late nights ;)

Any additional comments?

if you enjoy mind-expanding scientific/philosophical speculation then stick through the first few chapters of this book and you will find yourself hooked!

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Rune
  • Aabyhoej, Denmark
  • 12-03-12

Entertaining SciFi

If you could sum up Eon in three words, what would they be?

Thrilling epic mindbending

What did you like best about this story?

The surprise inside the stone and the depiction of this surprise

What about Stefan Rudnicki’s performance did you like?

He makes the characters come alive in my head. Thank you Stefan.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

The stone is the answer

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Epic SciFi.

Where does Eon rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Top 3.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Mirsky. I enjoyed the way his character was enlightened.

Have you listened to any of Stefan Rudnicki’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

No. He did a great job.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

The description of Axis City. It was exciting.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Gota like it.

Mr Bear never fails to entertain, and Mr Rudnicki makes the story line even more believable. I'll listen to this one again.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Excellent

It starts off feeling like Arthur C. Clarke's Rendezvous With Rama, but quickly turned into something infinitely more interesting and deep, in more ways than one.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Interesting time travel concept.

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

If said friend was into the concept of a multi-verse, the cold war era tension between the USSR & USA, nuclear war, space and the ability to open doors into other realities? Absolutely.

What does Stefan Rudnicki bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

I really like his style of reading and was introduced to him from novels by Ben Bova.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

the Very end scene with the Main character. its an awesome thought to a parallel earth concept

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Angus
  • Fort Collins, CO, United States
  • 04-07-16

Little Big Death

On an Earth that has suffered the little death, a limited nuclear war between the US and Russia, there is an uneasy negotiated peace. Russia seems to feel sort of like the Germans did post WW 1 when the enormity of reparations and limitations imposed by the international community settled in. Well opportunity knocks here when the asteroid called the 'potato' arrives in Earth orbit and is found to be a starship. A starship with humans on it...or at least there were and they had Earth languages.

Led by the US, that may be for of the fiction these days, the international community minus the Russians populate the 'potato' and begin to unravel the mysteries of the seven chambers. The fact that it is bigger on the inside than the outside is driving a lot of them bonkers. The people in charge of the project are trying all they can to keep a lid on predictions that this Earth is about to suffer annihilation.

Excellent book with lots of subplots that I'm sure will re-surge in this series called The Way. The narration was pretty good too with Rudnicki's vocal range. This one gets four out of five units of pleasant nerdiness. Enjoy!

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Heavy on theory

difficult read if you do not have a goods grasp of math or theoretical physics but also deals with the essentials of humanity.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

definitely one of the greatest SciFi books.

explores the idea of some of the most alluring ideas in science with detailed characters. Keeping a firm hand on scope and depth,yet remaining anchored in actual theory

0 of 1 people found this review helpful