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Publisher's Summary

Coyote marks a dramatic new turn in the career of Allen Steele, Hugo Award-winning author of Chronospace. Epic in scope, passionate in its conviction, and set against a backdrop of plausible events, it tells the brilliant story of Earth's first interstellar colonists - and the mysterious planet that becomes their home...

The crime of the century begins without a hitch. On July 5th, 2070, as it's about to be launched, the starship Alabama is hijacked - by her captain and crew. In defiance of the repressive government of The United Republic of Earth, they replace her handpicked passengers with political dissidents and their families. These become Earth's first pioneers in the exploration of space...

Captain R. E. Lee, their leader. Colonel Gill Reese, the soldier sent to stop Lee. Les Gilles, the senior communications officer, a victim of a mistake that will threaten the entire mission. Crewman Eric Gunther, who has his own agenda for being aboard. His daughter, Wendy, a teenager who will grow up too quickly. Jorge and Rita Montero, ordinary people caught up in extraordinary circumstances. And their son Carlos, who will become a hero in spite of himself.

After almost two-and-a-half centuries in cold sleep, they will awaken above their destination: a habitable world named Coyote. A planet that will test their strength, their beliefs, and their very humanity...

In Coyote, Allen Steele delivers a grand novel of galactic adventure - a tale of life on the newest of frontiers.

BONUS AUDIO: Includes an exclusive introduction by author Allen Steele

©2003 Allen Steele; (P)2008 Audible, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3.9 out of 5.0
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  • Overall
  • Emil
  • SkiveDenmark
  • 12-14-08

Coyote

Some people might have been easily offended by the notion of an oppressive government encouraging a minority to become colonists, but that's really quite silly. This story goes on well into the future and doesn't mention any particulars of our current circumstances. It could have gone on in any region of the world - the only reason it starts in America is because the writer is American, it isn't a commentary on any present situation. We can all relate to the concept of standing up to oppression.

Oppression and colonization is at the heart of American history. If anything, patriotic Americans should appreciate the storyline because it mirrors - and alludes to - the earliest history of the United States.
I propose any conservatives who feel offended by this book's theme - though it doesn't even appear to mention conservatism - should wonder why they assume their ideology is the oppressing one and why they assume the liberal ideology is the intellectual one.

Really, this is a realistic, hardly threatening, all-American story.

As for how the book is read, I find it well read, largely. The female narrator should have played a more prominent role from the start, but both narrators do a good job in my opinion. They are eloquent, use emphasis properly, and they use easily distinguishable tones of voice for the different characters, which greatly minimizes confusion.

And for fans of the whole "near-future science fiction, space colonization" genre, the storyline is quite enjoyable and exciting.

11 of 16 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • david
  • DUNDALK, MARYLAND, United States
  • 02-01-11

This book is horrible

I hated it! Half of the book is told in a series of past 'captains logs' and the narrator is horrible. Seems like they were really trying to be like the enders series but failed miserably.

4 of 7 people found this review helpful

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  • Story

Ugh narrator, great story

I really enjoyed this story. It was very well written, but I did not care for the narrator that they chose. He sounds too much like the movie voiceover guy and his voice just has too much of a dry robotic quality. The female narrator was alright though.

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  • Nozomi
  • A Tiny Cabin, Alaska
  • 08-18-16

Just fantastic!

The book is amazing, the story engaging. I love this whole series and my physical copy of the book is close to being in pieces. This is a wonderful story and the staet of a scifi epic not to miss.

The main narrator is not going to be for everyone. I know someone else who listened to this and didn't like the style. The book is very scientific at times and goes into amazing details. For certain parts of this book I find it perfect. Then in other parts where there are more characters and action, the natrorator does a great job with voicing and still keeping the book flowing. But with his own style. Also there are multiple narrorators? Which I didn't remember.

Listen to a preview, but the story is well worth it.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Cliche Political Bias Torpedoes Story Potential

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

It does give you something to listen to while you work.

What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

The most interesting aspect is the idea of colonizing another planet. Least interesting are the obligatory tropes I've just seen too much in science fiction and everywhere else.

Would you listen to another book narrated by Peter Ganim and Allen Steele ?

Depends on the book, but the narrator's nasal yawn does grate.

If this book were a movie would you go see it?

Doubt it. Very few directors out there who wouldn't make it even more annoying.

Any additional comments?

Evidently some other reviewers noticed the subtle (and not-so subtle) left-wing bias of the author. One reviewer basically said that's silly because the captain of the ship is named after Robert E. Lee...therefore it has pro-freedom underpinnings.<br/><br/>Right. About that...<br/><br/>Classic case of leftists projecting and twisting facts/redefining words. I'm sure Lenin and Trotsky convinced people they were pro-freedom, too, when necessary to gather support.Leftists are fine with individual liberty...as long as you think, speak, act and believe as they do. When you exercise your freedom as protected in the Bill of Rights but disagree with them on a significant subject, their inner Gestapo shines right through. They have long had a field day projecting their own tyrannical mindset (and other "liberal" virtues) on right-wing characters to demonize their opposition.<br/><br/>Just when the novel takes the plot in a direction where you get relief from the political undertones, the gender-bending cultural Marxism of the author kicks in.I see this way too often, too, where the author is either female or a gamma male (aspiring to beta male) who wounds suspension of disbelief by building characters to breathe life into their own fantasies and fetishes. Macho women are the level-headed, iron-willed saviors in survival situations. The author takes revenge on the playground bullies who haunt his psyche by writing the alleged alpha males as cowards and sissies deep down inside. The artistic, quiet (how the author no doubt sees himself) passive, uncompetitive beta males are the only men who are not reprehensible in one way or another.<br/><br/>While this is far from the most blatant example, I just wanted to escape this programming entirely for the length of a novel.<br/><br/>Oh yeah, Dr. Osaka is really inconsistent, too. The colony's physician, her decision to tag along on the canoe trip was both unrealistic and monumentally stupid. Yet she is sage-like wise when the plot calls for it. In one scene she submits to Carlos' authority (when it is foolish to do so) but in surrounding scenes she steadfastly asserts her dominance over all the males.<br/><br/>Gil Reese was a touch skitzo too, as written.<br/><br/>Planet colonization has huge story potential. This book didn't live up to it IMO.

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  • Ron
  • Asheboro, NC, USA
  • 03-21-15

Great book. Always something happening.

This book was full of action and impossible to predict what was going happen next. I finished it in less than one week.

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  • Laura
  • Dearing, GA, United States
  • 08-19-14

Ok. story. But not good enough

I liked the story ok, but not enough to buy the next book. You might like it, but buy the books one at a time.

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  • Performance
  • Story

No science in this fiction

What would have made Coyote better?

If Allen Steele had done a bit of research before sitting down to write this. There are glaring science errors through the book that a first year physics student could have caught.

What do you think your next listen will be?

Nothing written by Allen Steele

Which scene was your favorite?

*spoilers*<br/><br/>Probably the scene where they went to the ship from 150 years in the future where we learn about the ship, it's engine and the androids.

You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

The storytelling was good enough to get through the book.

Any additional comments?

The change in the narration for the middle section is jarring, but otherwise I liked it. The story, however... There were just so many times I was shaking my head.<br/><br/>*spoilers* <br/><br/>I was willing to forgive it all and continue on to the next book until the last part. The ship from 150 years in the future flies 47 light years to this colony and brings no food for it's 1000 colonists. They then attempt to impose on the 100 colonists that have been there all of 4 years expecting them to take care of them? Are people in the future all brain damaged? What would they have done if the first ship didn't make it? Way to put all your eggs in one basket.

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  • Jake
  • Marietta, GA United States
  • 03-12-14

Sheesh

Would you try another book from Allen Steele and/or Peter Ganim and Allen Steele ?

Some reviews implied a typical story of a fight for freedom that, nefariously or ignorantly, shapes the story to ironically reinforce real-world ignorance and oppression. A story politically educated and/or southerners would be offended by. Sadly, it is. The abusive govt uses nearly all southern names of civil war or civil rights struggles for bad guys. So?<br/><br/>Civil rights was not a north/south but an R/D struggle except for the vote. Racist hiring and redlining was NATIONWIDE, causing 1960s race riots in Chicago IL, Detroit MI, Harlem NY, Watts CA, etc; most not southern cities but all D run. Using Jesse Helms (1960s racist who swapped D for R party LATER in 1970s. Media used him for decades to push falsehood it was the Rs opposing when it was mainly Ds). Yet, somehow, his story's bad govt uses only southern names. A George Wallace shuttle but no Mayor Daily police HQ building, etc names? Gosh, I wonder why? What real-world impression might that cause, or awareness prevent?<br/><br/>As to the civil war refs, the names with the rest of the story reinforce the falsehood it was about the north freeing the slaves and equality. Consider why wars are really fought and the export tariff that triggered the war. Southern industrialization stayed halted (no new competition) and civil rights had to wait yet another 100 years, nationwide. The goal was retaining regional econ dominance and used R/D parties.<br/><br/>Isn't it great 9 of 10 USA kids are effectively locked into schools controlled by politicians who need not worry about competition costing revenue or much of the public becoming actually educated and encouraged to think? I managed to get to the protagonist on the 2nd amendment, how libertarianism only works when all are on the same side –what BS. To hell with the 100 lb gal fending off a 250 lb attempted rapist, I guess.<br/><br/>See the first two Aristeia series novels for SCI-FI for what this novel was supposed to be without stupidly offending Rs, Ds, or people who actually think and just want entertainment without stupid protagonists.

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  • Jean
  • Margaret, Manitoba, Canada
  • 11-22-12

Looking forward to the next in this series

What did you love best about Coyote?

The storyline and characters are interesting and feel familiar even though we're just meeting them in this book.

What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

I found the long explanations about the time shifts quite dry, but expect that aspect is more important later in the series.

What does Peter Ganim and Allen Steele bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

The narrators voices reinforced the character images very well.

Any additional comments?

I found this much easier to get into than many Fantasy Sci-Fi novels, as originating on Earth, it keeps enough Earth flavor to be instantly identified with! Good work, Mr. Steele!