Regular price: $25.17

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

When world-class biblical scholar Bart Ehrman first began to study the texts of the Bible in their original languages he was startled to discover the multitude of mistakes and intentional alterations that had been made by earlier translators. In Misquoting Jesus, Ehrman tells the story behind the mistakes and changes that ancient scribes made to the New Testament and shows the great impact they had upon the Bible we use today. He frames his account with personal reflections on how his study of the Greek manuscripts made him abandon his once ultraconservative views of the Bible.

Since the advent of the printing press and the accurate reproduction of texts, most people have assumed that when they read the New Testament they are reading an exact copy of Jesus's words or Saint Paul's writings. And yet, for almost fifteen hundred years these manuscripts were hand copied by scribes who were deeply influenced by the cultural, theological, and political disputes of their day. Both mistakes and intentional changes abound in the surviving manuscripts, making the original words difficult to reconstruct. For the first time, Ehrman reveals where and why these changes were made and how scholars go about reconstructing the original words of the New Testament as closely as possible.

Ehrman makes the provocative case that many of our cherished biblical stories and widely held beliefs concerning the divinity of Jesus, the Trinity, and the divine origins of the Bible itself stem from both intentional and accidental alterations by scribes -- alterations that dramatically affected all subsequent versions of the Bible.Bart D. Ehrman chairs the Department of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and is a widely regarded authority on the history of the New Testament.

©2005 Bart Ehrman (P)2006 Recorded Books

Critic Reviews

"Engaging and fascinating." (Publishers Weekly)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3.9 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    916
  • 4 Stars
    772
  • 3 Stars
    460
  • 2 Stars
    157
  • 1 Stars
    151

Performance

  • 3.9 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    613
  • 4 Stars
    514
  • 3 Stars
    309
  • 2 Stars
    77
  • 1 Stars
    77

Story

  • 3.9 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    666
  • 4 Stars
    454
  • 3 Stars
    259
  • 2 Stars
    116
  • 1 Stars
    97
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • deborah
  • Palm Coast, FL, United States
  • 11-30-11

Excellent Thesis for Theologians

This is a well narrated, well cited audiobook pointing to the problems with taking the Bible literally, including historical and anthropological points made about the accuracy of third person accounts, text copying, transations from Greek, Aramaic, and Latin into other tongues, and agendae by different persons. Perfect for those studying religion, or for Christians who doubt the Bible's literal meaning, but tends to be over the head of lay persons. For those of us who believe even one error found "throws the baby out with the bath water," the citations becomes superfluous.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Jaycee
  • Anchorage, Alaska 99503
  • 04-02-16

Another Christian Apologetic Book

Just another Christian author trying to explain what the bible means to say, trying to explain away what it actually reads. Trying to turn a violent, fantastical fairytale into "the good book" when it is anything but is impossible. Anyone who has actually read the book instead of listening to interpretations at Sunday school or mistranslations in tracts or other self serving material (like this book) has to put on blinders to stand the violence and misogyny not to mention the degradation of women/children or anyone slightly different from 'the chosen ones."

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Interesting content, impressive narration!

I am well into my second listen of this excellent little piece, and am delighted that it came to me in an Audible sale event. I have gotten everything that I bargained for and much more. I appreciate that the author treats the subject objectively, and is definitely not a "bible-basher". I agree with the other Audible reviewers regarding the depth and clarity of the author's work, and found it very compelling to hear.

I, however, think that Mr. Davidson's narration is terrific. He stresses words, pauses, and phrases exactly like he is speaking to me in normal conversation. On of my biggest problems with some spoken books is that the narrator can severely delimit the enjoyment of the read just by their matter-of-fact monotone. I love when authors read their own work. Although Mr. Davidson did not write the book, he conveyed the author's passion quite genuinely. Here is a man who speaks as if he knows intimately about the subject matter. I happily anticipate more from this narrator.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Laurie
  • KALAMAZOO, MI, United States
  • 12-05-11

Better for the eyes that for the ears...

I really appreciate this book. I did not appreciate the format, however. It is rather scholarly and has many quotations from scripture and citations from other works. This makes it a better read for the eye, not the ear. Content great, format not so much. The narrator does the best he can.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Marilyne
  • missouri city, TX, United States
  • 11-26-11

A must read!

Anyone with any interest in Christianity and/or the bible must read/listen to this book. Bart Ehrman has undertaken a mind boggling analysis of the data, and I am stunned by what his research has revealed. And grateful for his hard work!

No student of religion should be without this gem.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Daniel
  • Hayward, CA, United States
  • 11-08-11

Glad I read this book

At first i thought this was going to be a bashing of Christianity and the Bible. I decided to read it to see what critics of the bible had to say.
I was glad to see that this WAS NOT a bible bashing book! This book gave me a nice understanding of how the bible has been translated over time. Every time i see a little subscript explaining the different translations of a particular passage while reading the bible i immediately think of this book and have a better understanding of why/how these different translations could occur. I came away with the understanding that yes there are many different mistakes and version of the bible manuscripts, but it is amazing how many similarities there are too. Learning how they try to find the Original text from the various discovered translations was very interesting too.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Simon
  • Troy, NY, United States
  • 10-19-11

Disappointing

Based on the description of this book I was expecting a look into the politics of why the bible has been changed. While the author did talk about this somewhat in the context of the earliest Christians, the book is much more of a scholarly attempt to help the layman understand how specific passages have changed rather than the social ramifications of those changes. This is not the author's fault--he lays out his plan quite clearly--but rather a lack of clarity in the description of the book.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Rachel
  • MATTOON, IL, United States
  • 10-14-11

Mind-numbingly boring

I was expecting a riveting work that topples traditional biblical views. Instead, this book was hours and hours of rambling about WHO could have changed the bible. The author is clearly very learned and his educational background is impressive, but that doesn't make this book interesting. The title is very misleading.

1 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Essential!

I am absolutely impressed and revolutionalized.

For any person that considers the writings of the New Testament important to their life, this is an emergency highest alert book! The author does what every good historical author should do and every good student of history should want - puts things into perspective.

Without debunking the divinity of God in any of God's revealed forms, this author sensibly and scientifically reveals the irrefutable information that exposes the sense and the nonsense of the various cultures of Christianity, incredibly relevant to our modern time.

Anyone who considers the New Testament important should stop cold, not have 1 more Bible study, not pay 1 more homage to the "shrink to fit" doctrines of practiced church, not take 1 more doctrinal discussion until reading/listening to this essential book!

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

So informative listened twice, great job.

As a historical reference it opens the the discourse to the lay man, as a starting point, a great listen, and the non-biased look at who may and how possibly the shape of the bible has come to us.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful