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Publisher's Summary

From the ambassador of the UAE to Russia comes a bold and intimate exploration of what it means to be a Muslim in the 21st century.

In a series of personal letters to his sons, Omar Saif Ghobash offers a short and highly listenable manifesto that tackles our current global crisis with the training of an experienced diplomat and the personal responsibility of a father. Today's young Muslims will be tomorrow's leaders, and yet too many are vulnerable to extremist propaganda that seems omnipresent in our technological age. The burning question, Ghobash argues, is how moderate Muslims can unite to find a voice that is true to Islam while actively and productively engaging in the modern world. What does it mean to be a good Muslim? What is the concept of a good life? And is it acceptable to stand up and openly condemn those who take the Islamic faith and twist it to suit their own misguided political agendas?

In taking a hard look at these seemingly simple questions, Ghobash encourages his sons to face issues others insist are not relevant or not applicable or that may even be Islamophobic. These letters serve as a clear-eyed inspiration for the next generation of Muslims to understand how to be faithful to their religion and still navigate through the complexities of today's world. They also reveal an intimate glimpse into a world many are unfamiliar with and offer to provide an understanding of the everyday struggles Muslims face around the globe.

©2016 Omar Saif Ghobash (P)2017 Macmillan Audio

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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Wow!

Wow. I must admit I do not believe I have ever read a book written by a Muslim, at least not one about Islam. I am a Christian, and haven't ever listened deeply about issues pertaining to another religion. I have received my knowledge from the surface level of social media posts and newspaper headlines highlighting death and destruction. Omar reads the letters himself, which adds to the intimacy and heartfelt nature of his message. He urges everything from brave questioning to logical thought to fierce compassion and understanding. He is a brilliant man, in both head knowledge and heart knowledge, and I would highly recommend this book to anyone of any faith. This is my surprising book find of the last year. My only regret is this is his only published book and I want to hear more.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Eye opening

I found the book to be very insightful. Although I am not Muslim myself he discusses issue that cross age, gender and religious affiliations.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Loved this book!

I can't say enough about this book. Educational and emotional. Beautiful and thoughtful.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Love and respect to you Omar

I have always thought there will be a courageous Muslim to come out and express the truth of the reality our Arab/Muslim world. I have raised my 5 kids with similar attitude and witnessed a clash from the family and community. This book have confirmed that there is a way to change our situation in the Muslim world. I am a Palestinian and I am proud of you and your courage, Omar. My sincerest respect to you and your family. God bless you.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Important book for all

This book is an important read for anyone; not just Muslims. It contains valuable life lessons, as well as more understanding of how a young person could make right or wrong decisions. I listened on audible since I drive long distances and now I plan to buy the book so I can go back and refer to passages that were important to me.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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A great book

A great book. As Muslim, it helps me to think a lot about the things around me.

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Beautiful book, very insightful

Highly recommend this beautifully written book, that manages to combine a deeply personal narrative with insight that is important and relevant to absolutely everyone today.

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Thank You

Great Book for someone who is lost and try to make sense of islam in the western world. I felt I am not alone, and I am not wrong. Thank You.

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  • Micher
  • Falmouth, Nova Scotia Canada
  • 09-09-17

A "must read" for Muslims and non-Muslims alike

In a world gone crazy seeking power, wealth and control through violence, greed and egotism, Omar Saif Gobash writes these intelligent, thoughtful reflections to his son, Saif, and to the next generation of Muslims who are the hope for a new way of educated wisdom, respect of others and peaceful coexistence. Those of all faiths who oppose violence, hatred extremism to resolve problems must read this book.

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Disappointing

I had been really looking forward to this book. I thought that hearing from the son of an assassinated man with ties to Russia, the Middle East and the western world would be extremely educational and exciting.

Instead I found it mundane, monotonous and almost implausibly simplified. Every little thing being described in detail to the extent you forget what point the author was trying to make.