Regular price: $25.17

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

The foundations of capitalism are being battered by a flood of altruism, which is the cause of the modern world's collapse. This was the view of Ayn Rand, a view so radically opposed to prevailing attitudes that it constituted a major philosophic revolution. In this series of essays, she presented her stand on the persecution of big business, the causes of war, the default of conservatism, and the evils of altruism. Here is a challenging look at modern society by a woman who was one of the most provocative intellectuals on the American scene. Ms. Rand's unique philosophy, Objectivism, has gained a worldwide audience.
©1946 Ayn Rand; (P)2000 Blackstone Audiobooks

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    355
  • 4 Stars
    110
  • 3 Stars
    39
  • 2 Stars
    12
  • 1 Stars
    10

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    188
  • 4 Stars
    69
  • 3 Stars
    22
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    2

Story

  • 4.6 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    205
  • 4 Stars
    49
  • 3 Stars
    17
  • 2 Stars
    11
  • 1 Stars
    3
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Great book

For those trying to learn the nitty gritty of Rand's philosophy. Definitely do not recommend it as a first Ayn Rand book, you should read this only if curious about the specifics of her philosophy.

The second to last chapter and the last chapters are amazing and I will definitely reference them in the future.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

too deep to listen to

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

after several replays, and that's not easy on an ipod, i made the decision that this is not a book to listen to. the concepts are such that you need to stop and ponder what you just read. so, i bought the book in print. and it's a good thing. i can read only a few pages before i have to stop and discuss what i just read with my husband and compare it to current events and discuss accuracy.

Who was your favorite character and why?

there is no character or character development other than for comparison.

If this book were a movie would you go see it?

this book is not movie material. it's more economics and philosophy class material.

Any additional comments?

don't give up on this title if you find you can't listen to it. get a print version. you'll be glad you did.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

A Lot Of Redundancy. You Can Say That Again.

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

Ayn Rand makes excellent, well-researched points early on. Then, just won't let go. The constant restating of her points begins to wear thin. I stuck through, but it was work.

Would you be willing to try another book from Ayn Rand? Why or why not?

Not right away. I probably should have read "Atlas Shrugged" first. I'm not eager to try it now.

Which scene was your favorite?

None sticks out.

Do you think Capitalism needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

Isn't going to come too soon from Ms. Rand, I expect.

Any additional comments?

If you are already a die-hard capitalist, this book will reaffirm everything you already know and believe. I'm not sure that Ayn Rand's zealotry stands the test of time. Some of her theories, especially about companies' naturally seeking to do the right thing, simply do not hold true, especially in the food and drug industry category.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Interesting Economics

Everyone who reads anything written by Ayn Rand should know two things:

1) Her definition of altruism is not your definition of it.
2) To understand how her definition differs, you must read and grapple with a lot of her work.

That being said, if you can get past the nit-pickings many people bring to the table, people who are completely unable to see beyond the conceptual scheme within which their thoughts operate, you should be able to seriously enjoy this book.

Rand makes a case for Capitalism that is based on facts rather than historical narrative; i.e. she doesn't tell you compelling tear-jerkers to convince you, she simply restates the facts, as they are historically known. This brings me to another point, namely, that her definition of Capitalism is also not your definition of it.

For her, Capitalism represents every individual's ability to reach their full-potential, their own "Perfect 10" state-of-existence. Capitalism is something which allows people to excel based on merit rather than on fiat or consensus. People who think she doesn't care for the downtrodden are seriously mistaken.

On the contrary, Rand considers every individual as a whole, an "end in itself," meaning that a disabled person, (say someone with Down Syndrome,) has the same right to pursue their own happiness, their own ends, and their own fullest potential, as does the richest billionaire, or the most successful professional athlete, or any other cultural status symbol or cause we worship or might want to support.

That being said, there are a few things Rand says that will not sit well with many, and make her reading impossible for some people. Professional philosophers may be put-off by the dismissive manner with which she speaks of Kant, Plato, and pretty much every other philosopher that wasn't Aristotle. Additionally, she is singlemindedly unbending in her commitment to her view, and sometimes so stubborn that her backside begins to show.

Nevertheless, if you can get past the feelings of offense that might rise up within you, and separate her admittedly personal opinions from her more objective philosophical statements, I think you will find her reading satisfying, as well as compelling, both intellectually, and morally.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Peter
  • Morgantown, WV, United States
  • 05-12-13

Fuzzy Thinking

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I would recommend it. Ayn Rand is currently an influential author. However, her reasoning is frequently weak. There is, however, one insight that comes early in the book that is important and deserving of more attention than it is receiving. Rand reminds us that an economic order without a moral and ethical foundation is bound to fail.

Has Capitalism turned you off from other books in this genre?

No

What about Anna Fields’s performance did you like?

Goo reader

If you could give Capitalism a new subtitle, what would it be?

no suggestion

Any additional comments?

None

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Tansu
  • Tallahassee, FL, USA
  • 08-06-05

Proved wrong! Long and a little boring!

The book is about how capitalism is the best system for humanity and leise-faire capitalism (totally free market economy without any government intervention) is the best for the humanity. The author is wrong in some points. Economically it is proven that markets are not always efficient and free markets do not always output the optimum for the society. (you can read some game theory and strategy books about it) Actually, the author does not care about society a lot. She says, individualism is the most beneficial idea, and if everybody behaves selfishly, it will also be the best for the humanity, which is not.

John Nash actually proved this in 1950s but Ayn Rand did not appear to accept this phenomenon. Although I agree in many points in the book how capitalism is the most free system, it does not mean that it is the best system for the society. Capitalism still cannot solve the ever increasing income gap between the poor and the rich. This gap continuously widens.

25 of 114 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Tess
  • Ellensburg, WA, USA
  • 07-05-05

The Cult of Consumption Parrots this Book

If you like to hear how you can consume and comsume some more without consequence then Rand is for you. There is, however, nothing revolutionary about this book.

12 of 104 people found this review helpful