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My Advice to Pilgrims

Narrated by: Grant Peeples
Length: 2 hrs and 1 min
Categories: Drama & Poetry, Poetry
5 out of 5 stars (3 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Grant Peeples lives in a pink house. And he is not a poet who writes poems about his cats. Though a cat does get shot in a poem in My Advice to Pilgrims -after it is found killing a bird at the feeder in the front yard. The remainder of the 92 poems here are, by-in-large, void of gunfire. But all are equally unwavering in their own version of in-your-face-ness; and are patently bereft of nostalgia and sentimentality.

Each poem seems to have its own point. Not so much the kind of persuasive point that is related to an argument, but rather the kind of point that is found at the tip of an ice-pick. And it seems that Peeples' intent as a poet is to create a moment in each poem where his listeners feel that point - as it touches up against a bubble in their belief system, their assumptions, their understanding of things, or their level of comfortableness in their own skin. Or with their rote version of the truth about things. It would be fair to say that this is a poet who feels it might be his job to push you around some.

There is humor, too, sprinkled throughout My Advice to Pilgrims, as well as a handful of poems that have an unmitigated raunchiness to them. There is a narrative feel throughout, except in those cases where the poems have a mini-manifesto sense about them. And it is these particular poems that seem to be placed as keys to the other poems, as they reveal Peeples' views about the world: "I don't have a philosophy," he says, "but I do have a system."

September 2018 marks the publication of My Advice to Pilgrims, a book of poetry from Grant Peeples. The book is the latest from Mezcalita Press. Other writers published by the press include Jonathan Byrd, Rod Picott, Nathan Brown, Beth Wood, and Jon Dee Graham. In addition to writing poetry, Peeples is a recording artist with Gatorbone Records. He has recorded nine studio records, four of which were produced by Gurf Morlix, the Austin producer known best for producing Lucinda Williams, Ray Wylie Hubbard, Robert Earl Keen, and Slaid Cleaves.

Peeples makes his home in Tallahassee Florida, where he attended Leon High School. He received a BA in History and English at Appalachian State University. He was a co-founder of The Moon, an 800-seat music venue in Tallahassee. In the early 1990s he moved to Little Corn Island, Nicaragua. He built and operated Casa Iguana, an eco-resort. In 2006, he sold the business and returned to his native Tallahassee. His primary influences have been Joseph Campbell, author of The Power of Myth, the poet Robinson Jeffers, the Buddhist nun Pema Chodron, the essayist Joe Bageant, the art critic Dave Hickey, the artist Jim Roche, and the musician and songwriter Bob Dylan. Peeples has been involved with the environmental organization Earth First!. He was an ardent supporter of Barack Obama. He has pledged his support to the Resist Movement and the Antifa movement. He calls himself a Leftneck.

©2018 Lindsay Grant Peeples (P)2019 Lindsay Grant Peeples

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A poetic chronicle of our time

Peeples’ meter and verse is so well crafted it feels easy and pedestrian to the listener/reader. The subject matter is framed masterfully by an educated and informed artist who expresses righteous anger and judgement with a tone so ironic you laugh along with him at the sublime absurdness of it all.
You laugh despite the growing knot in your throat, trying to swallow down the stark biting commentary that rings true. It never grows heavy under the authentic despair and grief though, thanks to a stirring verse that grounds the piece here or a comical description there.
Critical modern allegory remains alive.