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Last Child in the Woods

Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder
Narrated by: Jonathan Hogan
Length: 11 hrs and 58 mins
4 out of 5 stars (326 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

New York Times and Washington Post contributor Richard Louv is the widely respected author of seven previous books. In Last Child in the Woods, Louv illustrates how the alienation of today's children from nature can lead to a host of childhood disorders - and he offers effective methods for healing this rift.
©2005 Richard Louv (P)2007 Recorded Books

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Amazing content, boring reader!

There is no other book in the world like this one! The studies, the stories, they're unsurpassed by any other nature book I've read. Unfortunately this reader has the ability to douse in chloroform even the most interesting of subjects. It took me over 7 months to finish this audiobook because I kept falling asleep to his hypnotic, rhythmic cadence. Read the book, but be warned: he reads like a relaxing robot.

10 of 10 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Required reading but soon turned into more...

What made the experience of listening to Last Child in the Woods the most enjoyable?

I was originally reading this book for my environmental psychology class but I have to say I soon couldn't put it down (which hardly ever happens with required reading books). This book was well written and brings up a lot of interesting thoughts. It pulls you in and makes you question if the things we do to help our children are actually subtly harming them in the long run. It brought up memories from my own childhood and made me reflect on how they have impacted my life and how todays children will never learn some of the lessons we learned when we were younger just by being given the freedom to explore.

Any additional comments?

If you like this book I would also recommend watching the documentary Play again. It revisits a lot of the same ideas but you see them in action.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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Monotonous

I can't listen it's so monotonous ☹️ disregard story rating since I can't get through it to accurately judge

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

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Hearing this book made all the difference

I had this book on my shelf for some time, but didn't read all of it until I was on my way to a workshop on the Outdoor Classroom. I listened in the car during my 6 hour drive from San Francisco to Pasadena. I passed by farms, lakes, pastures and dry farm land. I found a new appreciation for the stories and studies in this book as I reflected on the landscape.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Nostalgic and hopeful

I loved every bit of this nostalgic and hopeful take on children's (and mankind's) relationship with nature. It's no easy read for sure, but it is delightful, reflective, and almost transcendent at times. The narrator has a very warm, rich voice--like that of a father reading a bedtime story. Take your time finishing this book, discuss it with friends and family along the way, and relish every minute of it. Then slow down and enjoy more quality time in the great outdoors with someone dear to you.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Nature is not lost..... yet!

What a wonderful book, chronicling how important nature is to the development of our children

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Should be required reading for parents and teachers

This book may have changed me forever. it's hard to say right now because I just finished it, but I have not been able to stop thinking about it since I started it (only a week ago). I wish that this book was required reading for all parents and teachers of young children. I think it would make an enormous impact on our future if children were encouraged and allowed to wander outdoors. To bring nature in to the regular classroom could have incredible impact on our future as a whole.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • EAD
  • Arizona
  • 04-16-17

Crucial

The point is repeating, but necessary. This book will remind you of your disconnection with nature, make you more present as to protecting it; and if you have children, want to protect their ability to connect with nature.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Great until it devolves into religious nonsense.

What made the experience of listening to Last Child in the Woods the most enjoyable?

The thorough review of current studies around Nature Deficit Disorder is fascinating. I added more bookmarks to this audiobook than any other I've downloaded.

It is unfortunate that as the book draws to a close, Louv lays religion on thickly. I was brought up in a Christian community in the deep south. As a kid, I explored nature endlessly and experienced the spiritual awe described in the book.

As an adult atheist (of the pleasant variety), my sense of awe in nature has only increased. Implying that my experience should in some way be linked to religion or a supernatural deity is just silliness and cheapens an otherwise wonderful book.

What did you learn from Last Child in the Woods that you would use in your daily life?

Last Child in the Woods helped to solidify many of my thoughts and feelings that my wife and I have been having. It has inspired us to work harder at converting every scrap of our home into a sustainable, natural setting for our child to enjoy.

11 of 14 people found this review helpful

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required reading

are you a human? wether you like the outdoors or not, this is required reading.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful