Regular price: $48.99

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

The definitive account of Germany's malign transformation under Hitler's total rule and the implacable march to war. This magnificent second volume of Richard J. Evans's three-volume history of Nazi Germany was hailed by Benjamin Schwartz of The Atlantic Monthly as "the definitive English-language account... gripping and precise." It chronicles the incredible story of Germany's radical reshaping under Nazi rule. As those who were deemed unworthy to be counted among the German people were dealt with in increasingly brutal terms, Hitler's drive to prepare Germany for the war that he saw as its destiny reached its fateful hour in September 1939.

The Third Reich in Power is the fullest and most authoritative account yet written of how, in six years, Germany was brought to the edge of that terrible abyss.

©2006 Richard J. Evans (P)2010 Gildan Media Corp

Critic Reviews

“[Evans’s] three-volume history... is shaping up to be a masterpiece. Fluidly narrated, tightly organized and comprehensive." (William Grimes, The New York Times)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.6 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    431
  • 4 Stars
    168
  • 3 Stars
    45
  • 2 Stars
    10
  • 1 Stars
    1

Performance

  • 4.4 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    299
  • 4 Stars
    137
  • 3 Stars
    46
  • 2 Stars
    7
  • 1 Stars
    7

Story

  • 4.6 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    342
  • 4 Stars
    120
  • 3 Stars
    29
  • 2 Stars
    8
  • 1 Stars
    0
Sort by:
  • Overall

Good but annoying

I agree with the other reviewer regarding the reader. This book needs a second edition update - not read by Sean Pratt. If you can get past the herky-jerky narration then it's worthwhile but I'm off to my local Library for the other two volumes.

10 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Maria
  • Sacramento, CA, United States
  • 08-14-10

Great book, annoying narrator

This is a thorough and well-organized history of post Weimar Republic Germany before the actual outbreak of war. My only gripe would be the narrator, who often pauses mid-sentence (not at a comma) and reminds one of a high school student. He mispronounces even some common words. To top it off, he narrates with a sarcastic tone which makes his mediocre reading ability even more annoying. BTW, you won't notice these things in your "sample listening." It will take you about an hour of listening for him to really begin getting on your nerves.

17 of 18 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

A catalog of horrors

The second book in Richard Evans' trilogy of Nazi Germany.

As if the horrors detailed in the first volume were not enough, Mr Evans details the gradual erosion of the individual rights of all Germans and the complete indifference showed by most to that loss of freedom and especially to the loss of liberty and dignity of the persecuted minorities. An outstanding book that should be read by all.

As with the first volume, my only complaint is the flat and uninspired reading of Sean Pratt. But even that is not enough to cause this wonderful book to lose a star. As after reading the first volume, I will purchase the next as soon as I can gather the courage to listen to another, more brutal, list of horrors.

One can only wonder what those responsible for not stopping the Nazis when they had the power told themselves after the fact. Did Chamberlain ever have to deal with what he helped create? Or Baldwin? Or others in the British and French governments who could have stopped the Nazi horror in its cradle? Did those people who continually ignored Churchill's warnings ever have to face up to what they helped create?

15 of 16 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Amanda
  • Scullin, Australia
  • 12-30-11

A great historical work, well-narrated

I am working my way through listening to the whole Evans' trilogy. It is good historical scholarship and a well-written narrative history of the Third Reich. As an audio-book, the narrator is generally pretty good - I have no problems listening to his narration and I have found the first two volumes (yet to listen to the third) excellent.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Excellent text in need of better narrator

Evans' trilogy is a significant contribution to what is available in English. Yes, it is quite detailed and specific: obviously some readers do not require so much detail. But that is precisely why I have gotten so much from Evans' work. I've been a student of German history for decades and am always looking to learn something new. The author's knowledge of the German language allows him to delve into primary sources, not just rehash the same old stuff.

Getting through the series was difficult for me, not because of the writing style, but due to the content itself. The events and stories are told in living color. Often they are horrific and heart-breaking, and at times utterly incomprehensible and disturbing. In my opinion, Evans handles the subject matter well, neither holding back nor resorting to hyperbole.

Another difficulty with getting through the series is the narration. I was not thrilled with Sean Pratt's reading of Vol. 1, "The Coming of the Third Reich," and if anything he is even more annoying in this book. I would hope that a reader of a book about Nazi Germany would have at least a basic competence in pronouncing German names. Pratt's bizarre pacing and fingernails-on-a-chalkboard pronunciation are utterly excruciating. I live in hope that eventually a new narrator will do the series, though I doubt it as each book is so long and doubtless expensive to produce.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Leaves me wanting for more

As with the first of this series I found the information to be quite interesting. I have since read Storm of war and No Simple Victory to supplement my knowledge.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Gets very bogged down in the details

The first book is worth listening to, especially if you've already read Shirer's "Rise and Fall of the Third Reich." It gives a different view that Shirer's--more detailes in some forms, less detailed in others.

This book ("The Third Reich in Power") is terminally boring, especially in the middle two sections. Listening to hour after hour of the administrative pettiness of the Nazis may be very interesting to a sociologist, but the vast majority of history buffs can probably skip it. The fourth part, getting into the foreign policy during the 30s, finally gets interesting again.


Also, as has been said before, the reader is simply AWFUL. It sounds as if this is the first time he's seen the material, he inserts random pauses, mispronunciations, etc. Just awful.

Still looking forward to the third book.

5 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

How can it happen?

I selected this book because of being curious how the Nazi's gained power and how such insanity took over. I was not disappointed. This is the first of a trilogy about Nazi Germany written by an English history professor. It's fairly new (2004) and examines many aspects of German politics, society, art, education, science leading up to and post World War I. I knew that the WWI defeat of Germany and the subsequent treatment, followed by the Great Depression were part of what enabled Hitler and his Nazi party to take over. However, Evans also covers general apathy, and how nobody thought this uneducated, unrefined man could take over. Also, others simply went along to avoid being beaten and tortured during the oncoming reign of terror. I immediately got the 2nd volume, and I'm sure the 3rd will follow after that. Very textured book - I kept stopping and looking up various people who were described or quoted.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Boring

1) Reading is terrible. Especially when you first start it is painful to listen to.
2) Parts of the book are quite good. I actually got very renengaged in the book at the end to the point of thinking about downloading the next volume, however, the middle of the book is awful. You can zone out for hours and feel like you have missed nothing. Its just endless dribble unless you want to hear about the particular effect of the Nazi's on a host of individuals.
3) find the author to be very arrogant. In the beginning of the book he talks (for over an hour) on his goals for the book. I find it amazing that he is so critical of Shirer's book, who has the advantage of actually having lived through the period. In addition, he dismisses evneets/controversies that are in almost every book on the period i have read. For instance he dismisses Hitler's relationship with his cousin as that a lot has been said and written about it but that there is no evidence they ever had a relationship, without quoting ANY evidence or reason for his opinion. He does this for several other issues as well. If you are going to be critical of others, at least give some data for why you feel that way. Then on top of that he argues that he is not here to be judgemental of the nazi regime. Hello? Every sentence is essentially a judgement.
Overall a very poor experience.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

An Amazing Part 2

One should definitely read the prior installment to this (The Coming of the Third Reich). This book did not disappoint as a follow up.

It's a really great look at exactly how the Nazis consolidated their power, used propaganda and organization to creep into every day life, and there are a lot of excellent and compelling first person accounts and narratives sprinkled throughout.

The narrator (who I thought was fine and was so used to be the third book I'd forget I was listening to someone reading at all) has an odd way of pronouncing the word coordinate, almost like co-ordinate. But given how Nazis usurped civilian, governmental and religious organizations and it was all referred to as "coordination" I think this verbal inconsistency is actually helpful because it makes you stop and think every time the Nazis take power in a different arena.

The whole thing is compelling from understand how pervasive Nazi ideology was, largely helped by the fact they had taken over all forms of education. This is critical to understanding German's attitudes when the war started and how many of them reacted passively to the ever growing tendrils of totalitarianism.

Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Phillip Lawrence
  • 04-04-16

Very thorough account

Detailed background of how the Third Reich built and led Europe to war

Very disappointing narration, mainly put off by the accent and pronunciation of repetitive words and phrases

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Rolf Bonde Bondeson
  • 06-27-11

What you did not know, very interesting

The two first books on Third reich is very interesting with lots of details. A must be for any one interested in why it became very bad in 30'ties and 40'ties.
Narrator is very good, but should take a basic course in german pronounciation. Who have ever heard of Gehring oh dear it is Herman Göring, took me long time to figure out. Could be ok in US or Isles, but not on the continent

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Hudds Man
  • 11-25-14

Great Writing, dreadful reading

Would you consider the audio edition of The Third Reich in Power to be better than the print version?

Probably Not

Who might you have cast as narrator instead of Sean Pratt?

Somebody who can actually read English. The mid-phrase pauses were very distracting and made some parts very difficult to follow. Mr Pratt seriously needs to learn how to pronounce basic English words such as quay.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

Understand why it happened.

Any additional comments?

The whole series provided a great insight into the Third Reich. Generally very well written but the reading was very poor indeed.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Eva
  • 11-15-13

in power...

What did you like most about The Third Reich in Power?

There is nothing not to like. It is great book showing point of view of regular Germans in different parts of society.

What did you like best about this story?

I liked the letters and diary entries added for the feel of an era.

What about Sean Pratt’s performance did you like?

He is the best narrator for this type of book. I wish he did some of the WWI and WWII documentaries on TV as narrator. Love his voice for history book. Didn't doze off even for a minute and I listen all day long!

0 of 3 people found this review helpful