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Editorial Reviews

The United States' addiction to oil has meant that the country has to remain good friends with the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia - regardless of how the Arabs behave. The Kingdom has been proved to be bankrolling terrorist organisations, distributing enormous amounts to an indolent extended royal family so that they can enjoy a lavish lifestyle, buying up western industry, and of course, maintaining numerous Swiss bank accounts. So explains ex-CIA operative Robert Baer in his latest work, Sleeping With The Devil.

Saudi Arabia is sitting on the world's largest reserve of crude oil, and that oil is much easier to extract in that country than anywhere else in the world. The Petrodollars pouring into the economy has seen massive investment in infrastructure, hospitals, schools, and of course - mosques. Yet in these holy places, the populace is exhorted to hate the United States, the western world, and non-Muslims. Some of the terrorists who carried out the 9/11 atrocity were from Saudi Arabia. But the United States, says Mr. Baer, desperately dependent on the flow of gasoline, still bows and scrapes...

Robert O'Keefe provides the narration, which totals just over six hours. This was another book that I listened to in one sitting, and thoroughly enjoyed. Mr. O'Keefe has a rich-voiced American accent, making for an easy listen despite, at times, being a difficult subject. The audio quality is superb, particularly at Audible Format 4, quite obviously a direct digital recording. This book is an interesting and enlightening way to spend six hours!

--Brad Jackson, UK

Publisher's Summary

In his powerful new audiobook, Robert Baer, author of See No Evil, turns his attention to Saudi Arabia, revealing how our government's cynical relationship with our Middle Eastern ally and America's dependence on Saudi oil make us increasingly vulnerable to economic disaster and put us at risk for further acts of terrorism.

For decades, the United States and Saudi Arabia have been locked in a "harmony of interests." America counted on the Saudis for cheap oil, political stability in the Middle East, and lucrative business relationships for the United States, while providing a voracious market for the kingdom's vast oil reserves. With money and oil flowing freely between Washington and Riyadh, the United States has felt secure in its relationship with the Saudis and the ruling Al Sa'ud family. But the rot at the core of our "friendship" with the Saudis was dramatically revealed when it became apparent that fifteen of the nineteen September 11 hijackers proved to be Saudi citizens.

In Sleeping with the Devil, Baer documents with chilling clarity how our addiction to cheap oil and Saudi petrodollars caused us to turn a blind eye to the Al Sa'ud's culture of bribery, its abysmal human rights record, and its financial support of fundamentalist Islamic groups that have been directly linked to international acts of terror, including those against the United States. Drawing on his experience as a field operative who was on the ground in the Middle East for much of his twenty years with the agency, as well as the large network of sources he has cultivated in the region and in the U.S. intelligence community, Baer vividly portrays our decades-old relationship with the increasingly dysfunctional and corrupt Al Sa'ud family, the fierce anti-Western sentiment that is sweeping the kingdom, and the desperate link between the two.

©2003 Robert Baer; (P)2003 Random House, Inc. Random House Audio, a dividion of Random House, Inc.

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