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Krakatoa Audiobook

Krakatoa: The Day the World Exploded, August 27, 1883

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Publisher's Summary

The legendary annihilation in 1883 of the volcano-island of Krakatoa (the name has since become a by-word for a cataclysmic disaster) was followed by an immense tsunami that killed nearly 40,000 people. Beyond the purely physical horrors of an event which has only very recently become properly understood, the eruption changed the world in more ways than could possibly be imagined. Dust swirled round the world for years, causing temperatures to plummet and sunsets to turn vivid with lurid and unsettling displays of light. The effects of the immense waves were felt as far away as France. Barometers in Bogota and Washington went haywire. Bodies were washed up in Zanzibar. The sound of the island's destruction was heard in Australia and India and on islands thousands of miles away.

Most significantly of all, in view of today's new political climate, the eruption helped to trigger in Java a wave of murderous anti-western militancy by fundamentalist Muslims, one of the first eruptions of Islamic killings anywhere. Simon Winchester's long experience in world wandering, history, and geology give this fascinating and iconic event an entirely new life and perspective.

©2003 Simon Winchester; (P)2003 HarperCollinsPublishers, Inc.

What the Critics Say

"Thrilling, comprehensive, literate, meticulously researched and scientifically accurate....It is one of the best books ever written about the history and significance of a natural disaster." (The New York Times Book Review(
"If you're looking for drama, you'll certainly find it here....Winchester manages a dry and ironic delivery, very much in keeping with his writing style. But the main point of interest when the dust has settled is the far-flung ramifications of this eruption upon world events. This is a winner." (AudioFile)
"All readers, science-prone or not, will be delighted by this experience-expanding book." (Booklist)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.1 (702 )
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4.4 (346 )
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Performance
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  •  
    rwise Deer Park, TX 01-26-04
    rwise Deer Park, TX 01-26-04 Member Since 2002
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Great subject, great writing, great voice"

    About a month ago I requested this title from audible and was very excited to find it available now. The author is a geologist and writes in a very pleasant style, easy to follow and very unique. Interesting facts about the catastrophe itself but also about the world, the technology and the people of 1883 are connected and very well projected. I admire the author for his reading skills. Often I find that authors should not read their own books and leave that task to the professional actors, in this case though, I enjoyed it very much. He has an excellent voice, and since he describes a few personal encounters, it is very delightful that he reads those to the listener himself. If people don't like this book, they may expect something else than this first class science report. It is not a love story, nor an imaginary tale. If you read scientific american, enjoy good writing and a new voice to read to you, you will enjoy this book.

    30 of 30 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Novie E. Lee 04-27-04 Member Since 2017
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    "Another WIN for Winchester!"

    Once again I sing the praises of Simon Winchester. Here is a man who can tell a story! Now wait a minute -- this is NOT fiction. If you are looking for a novel, go elsewhere. This is the true, well-researched account of the most monumental disaster in recorded human history! It's the real thing! You can look in any encyclopedia and read about the eruption of Krakatau/Krakatoa, but Winchester gives you so much more! His research is astonishing and the way he explains it all in so much detail is wonderful!
    I like the way he put this horrible event in perspective regarding world events of the time and how the Krakatoa calamity may have caused some of the tension in the world we are living in today.

    I am not aware that the man is a geologist, but I know for certain he is a darn good writer. I love his reading style -- so properly British and all that... I am impressed by his ability to amass a lot of facts and work them into a fascinating narrative. History lesson? Why not! Keep them coming, Simon. I will read whatever you write and love every minute of it.

    13 of 13 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Doc 02-23-04
    Doc 02-23-04 Member Since 2004
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    "Perfect"

    A superb work, superbly read by the author. This is not an historical novel, so don't come to it looking for exciting fiction. Another reviewer had it right in saying that if you enjoy Scientific American, then you'll enjoy this. A perfect tapestry, woven from the threads of every field of science. Kudos.

    9 of 9 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Janice Sugar Land, TX, United States 06-19-15
    Janice Sugar Land, TX, United States 06-19-15 Member Since 2010

    Rating scale: 5=Loved it, 4=Liked it, 3=Ok, 2=Disappointed, 1=Hated it. I look for well developed characters, compelling stories.

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    "The shot heard 'round the world."

    I agree with one reviewer who said that your opinion of this book may depend on what you’re looking for. If you want a rip-snorting disaster epic, this won’t work. If you delight in grand historic events placed in context with history, politics, geography and science, told with a generous dollop of wry humor, you’re in the right place. The research is impressive, made accessible by the comfortably expert delivery. Who would have thought that plate tectonics could be not merely interesting, but entertaining? Winchester’s talent with words, his obvious affection for his subject, and his spot-on reading made this truth better than fiction. My only caveat, and the reason for only 4 stars overall, is that those who listen while driving don’t have the option of looking at maps while listening in order to keep the specific geographic points straight as they are described. But the story deserves full marks for successfully making history and science a riveting “read”. I learned much more than I expected, not just about the eruption, but about the global context of the event and its aftermath, including the cliffhanger that it is likely to happen again.

    8 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Ethan M. Philadelphia 08-18-14
    Ethan M. Philadelphia 08-18-14 Member Since 2005

    On Audible since the late 1990s, mostly science fiction, fantasy, history & science. I rarely review 1-2 star books that I can't get through

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    "Almost great, but more smoke than heat"

    Krakatoa is almost amazing, but ends up merely good. All the elements of an excellent book are there: Simon Winchester is funny and engaging; the science is interesting; the period of history is fascinating; and Krakatoa has important implications for today's world. Further, Winchester covers all of this - the science, the history, and the modern implications. So, the problem isn't the facts, or the underlying material, instead it is in the way that he weaves them together.

    The book aims for Bill Bryson, using Krakatoa to discuss various fascinating issues, but, unlike Bryson, Winchester can't seem to bring them all together very well. Many interesting points are raised, but never truly connect, making most of the book feel disjointed. For example, the history of Batavia is a major story early in Krakatoa, but Batavia itself is undamaged by the volcano, and there is little follow-up to help us understand why the author spent so much time on the city. Or take the intellectual history of plate tectonics, which is introduced through some plummy personal anecdotes, but then mostly abandoned later in the story. A stronger narrative might have concentrated on a few people or institutions, and how they were effected by Krakatoa, but instead we are taken on a whirlwind tour where little sticks in the memory.

    It certainly isn't bad, and I did learn a lot about a fascinating period, but between the somewhat disjointed story and the occasional over-reach (Krakatoa lead to the rise of fundamentalist Islamic terrorism?), I often found my attention wandering while listening.

    8 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Stephanie Minneapolis, MN, USA 03-10-05
    Stephanie Minneapolis, MN, USA 03-10-05
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    "One of the best books ever"

    I've listened to this book several times. Winchester's voice is hynotic. He describes the history of Indonesia, pepper, Dutch colonialsim, tsunamis, early telegraph communication, the London Times, and the discovery of plate techtonics. It is a really wonderful book - well-researched and topical.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amy 02-03-04
    Amy 02-03-04
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    "Depends on what you're looking for..."

    If you love books full of details and in-depth history, as well as anecdotal tales and evidence, this book is for you! If you've read the Publisher's Summary and are expecting a book that's, well, "lively", you should probably look elsewhere. Case-in-point: It took nearly five hours to get to the explosion of Krakatoa! I'd seen this book in the book store and was beside myself with excitement when I saw it on Audible.com. Having just finished "Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency" by Douglas Adams, I was looking for something a bit more serious and dramatic. Unfortunately, "Krakatoa" wasn't what I was expecting, explaining everything from the political and economical history of the area to plate tectonics and Darwinism. Obviously, the author is very knowledgable on the subject, and a tremendous amount of research must have gone into this book -- and on the subject of Krakatoa, I personally found the latter half of the book, following the explosion, much more interesting...especially the discussion about Islam. I just depends what you're looking for.

    29 of 34 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Karin W. Dublin, CA USA 09-08-11
    Karin W. Dublin, CA USA 09-08-11 Member Since 2008

    Fantasy and Romance Author

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    "Fascinating and comprehensive"

    Half the joy of this book are the digressions...in telling the tale of the Krakatoa eruption, Winchester also gives the history of everything touching on Krakatoa, inlcuding (but not limited to) the spice trade's origins in antiquity, the history of map-making, Dutch colonialism in Indonesia, the origins of the Reuters news service, the birth of the first global communications network in the 19th century (via undersea telegraph lines), the mechanics of vulcanism and plate tectonics, the history of geologic thought and theory, the origins of radical Islam in Indonesia...

    I found this book very interesting and enjoyable, and Simon Winchester does an excellent job of narrating his own book. Definitely worth the credit, and I'm now going to see what else Audible has available that's authored by him.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Edwin 03-01-05
    Edwin 03-01-05
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    "Tedious"

    The first 3 or 4 hours were very difficult to wade through. After that the narrative picked up and was quite enjoyable. Loaded with facts and somewhat tedious to listen too.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Matthew 10-01-16
    Matthew 10-01-16
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    "On the Fence on This One!"

    This is the second book I’ve listened to by Simon Winchester, which I was prompted to do by his title The Professor and the Madman. This book seemed to be the most interesting of all his other titles beyond that book, but as good as that book was this book simply does not measure up on any level. This book left me feeling flat and unsated. While I did finish the book in a reasonably swift manner I was doing so more in hopes that it would suddenly, and without warning, grab me and pull me in. It never did.

    Krakatoa is overly detailed and it has far too much ancillary filler history about the colonial ambitions of the Europeans, about the location, and the goings on of the people in Batavia; so on and so forth. It reads more like a history text book then what a book like this, by this caliber of writer, should read like. It simply does not focus enough on the event itself in my view. A small glimmer of hope is that Winchester managed to weave enough interesting scientific information into the entire telling that I did learn something and I found those parts particularly good and of value.

    Winchester is a very good narrator, but narration alone cannot invest someone in a book. I have mixed emotions about this book because I judge my books based on how much I learn, how many bookmarks I place for later reference, how I feel about listening to the book again, and if the writer can stick to the facts without bias or embellishment. I definitely learned new things from this book, but I placed only two book marks, I’m not sure about listening again, and I'm not sure how biased some of the story is? So, I sit on the fence wondering what I should do because as I write this I honestly cannot say 'get the book', or, 'avoid the book'. I wish Audible allowed updates to reviews so I could give it another go and if I find I am wrong update this! I regret being of no help in your decision!

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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