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Publisher's Summary

On 25 May 1982, at a critical juncture in the Falklands War, the destroyer HMS Coventry was attacked by Argentinean aircraft. In a devastating strike, she was hit by three bombs, two of which exploded inside her hull, killing 19 of her crew and leaving many others badly injured. Within minutes Coventry had capsized, and would finally sink the following day. It was the first occasion since the Second World War that a British captain and crew had to abandon a stricken ship. This is the highly personal, often harrowing story of Coventry’s war told by her captain.

PUBLISHER’S NOTE: This Audio Book contains some explicit scenes/language.

©2007 David Hart Dyke (P)2014 Audible, Inc.

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  • J. A. Hill
  • 11-10-14

A good account but lacking depth

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

Only if interested in the story of Coventry.<br/>It's a good account but lacks any depth/guts/passion.<br/>The author expends as many words detailing his family history and correspondence home than the actual naval war.<br/>

What three words best describe Paul Blake’s performance?

Long winded, could have abbreviated some of the English. All of the have nots and did nots and everything else i can think of are all read out explicitly which seem endless and do nothing to help the flow of the narrative

Was Four Weeks in May worth the listening time?

Yes