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Publisher's Summary

On April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King, Jr., the prophet for racial and economic justice in America, was fatally shot. Only hours earlier, he had ended his final public speech by promising that "we as a people will get to the Promised Land."

Now, at the 40th anniversary of King's assassination, acclaimed public intellectual Michael Eric Dyson gives a comprehensive reevaluation of the fate of America, specifically black America, since that date.

Ambitiously and controversially, he investigates the ways in which we as a people have made it to that Promised Land King spoke of, and the many areas in which we still have a long way to go.

April 4, 1968 takes a sweeping view of King's death, remembering all the toil, triumph, and tribulation that led to that fateful date while anticipating the ways in which King's legacy will affect the future of the United States.

©2008 Michael Eric Dyson; (P)2008 Blackstone Audio, Ic.

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  • Overall

Compelling

With so many books about Martin Luther King, Jr. on the market and with a flood of new ones recently published to capture the interest surrounding the 40th anniversary of King's murder, why pick up another one?

First, Michael Eric Dyson has proven to be one of the most engaging and thought-provoking social commentators of the past few years. Second, he brings both his deep intellect as well as his accessible communication gifts to this tribute to Rev. Dr. King, and the impact of his life and death on our society. Dyson does a great job of setting April 4, 1968 in the context of the time, reflecting of King's difficulties and depression, as well as his notoriety and success. But more than merely a tribute to a fallen leader, Dyson also examines the aftermath, both good and bad, especially within the African-American community, but also for our world as a whole. A powerful "literary license" is Dyson's epilogue, an "interview" with King on his 80th birthday--a truly thought inspiring chapter.

With a host of volumes about King on the market, this one is well worth exploring.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Bob
  • Maryland, USA
  • 05-17-08

Great book, read by author

This is truly a great book it not only tells about the tragic day that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assinated, but gives a history of the other people involved. And how each of the players were involved with King. As well as where they are in 2008.

The reading by the author, Michael Eric Dyson, makes the book espesially good. I highly recommend this book to all who loved King as I did.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Excellent book to Read on King!

I always enjoy reading books from Rev. Dr. Michael E. Dyson. He always knows how to fabricate sociology notion, academia concept and spiritual connection to the books he has written. This book is no different about Martin Luther King, Jr. In addition, what I enjoyed listening to it now after the Administration of President Obama; I can analyze how far America has really come not only 49 years after King's death but also after the tenure of President Obama's administration. Again, good book, would recommend all to read/ listen if you are a King Theologian.

RCF

  • Overall
  • Andy
  • Chicago, IL, United States
  • 07-01-09

Mis-Titled

Well, at least Mr. Dyson devotes a third of the book to Dr. King, which is why I bought it. The title should have been, "A bit about Martin Luther King, and mostly how racist the USA is, and why Dr. King would now support everything I believe".

Mr. Dyson does give a good history, and delves into the history of Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton. He then goes on to pontificate about his own thoughts for most of the book.

At the end of the book, he has a fake "interview" with King, and talks about how Dr. King would support EVERYTHING the Democratic party now says. In this "interview", King says how awful it is that "Christians use the gospel to distort reality against GLBT brothers and sisters". I think it is equally appalling for Mr. Dyson to hijack a prominent leader who is dead and cannot answer, to tell people he would agree with political positions which Kings' beliefs would not support.

Bait and switch. It's 1/3 about Dr. King, and 2/3 a redone lecture that I've already hear dozens of times.

0 of 3 people found this review helpful