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Finding Life on Mars

A Novel of Isolation
Narrated by: Jennifer Jill Araya
Length: 7 hrs and 54 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (8 ratings)
Regular price: $19.95
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Publisher's Summary

When the last man on Earth reveals he has a nuclear weapon pointed at the tiny Martian colony, the colonists can only survive by working together. Jaye, a Trueborn Child of Mars, isn’t like her father, Merlin. Like all the Trueborn, she is cursed with perfect memory and deep sensitivity. But not even the knowledge that Merlin killed her mother can change the fact: They need each other for more than survival.

©2018 - Jason Dias (P)2019 Jason Dias

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Like Mars, then make this your next read...

Yeah, I have to admit it... although I've been a SF/F fan most of my life, it wasn't til I read "The Martian" by Andy Weir, that I actually gave any serious thought to Mars, and what colonizing it would look like. And no, the Edgar Rice Burroughs, Barsoom novels that I read in high school don't really count... I haven't read everything that's out there, but I do find myself perking up now when I see "Mars" in the title...
I really enjoyed this interesting take on what a colony might look like... A colony abandoned before it really got started, a colony of limited resources and dwindling population. No replenishment ship is coming, and Earth's been completely ravaged by bad politics and climate change. Plus now a maniac, possibly the last man on earth, is threatening their very existence... Jason Dias made an interesting choice when writing the book, the children born on Mars are born different with Hyperthymesia and possibly somewhat on the autistic spectrum, because of their differences they've created a self-imagined obstacle which makes heartfelt communication almost impossible. So not only are they dealing with the threat from earth, but they have to overcome all barriers including themselves to survive...
Jennifer Jill Araya was able to pull off this challenging book with aplomb, giving each character the voice they needed to tell their part of the story...
So if you like stories like The Martian (Andy Weir), The Lady Astronaut of Mars (Mary Robinette Kowal), and Retrograde (Peter Cawdron), you might want to make this your next read... This audiobook was good!

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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cool story

the story was really good I'm glad I picked this one up cant 2aot from more from this writer

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Very well done

I was very much impressed with the way the whole book played out. Seeing everything from the point of view of a colony new "Martians" with the little changes the planet brings out. The Narrator did a good job of keeping me involved in the story and bringing it all to life. Definitely an author and narrator I will seek out in the future. I received a free copy of this audio in return for an unbiased review.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Good story the unfolds naturally

This is a good book which develops in a logical, yet not totally predictable fashion. It does make you think about where we as a world are headed. The narration is great! It doesn't detract from the story at all. It adds to it. I was expecting a bit more science than it had. This is the first book (which I requested promising to review it) from this author, so I'm not completely sure what genre he typically writes from. I read it in 2 days, so that should help you know how that I enjoyed it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Eulogy for Earth

Earth is dead, one of the last residents is wanting the rest of the colonists to be destroyed with them. Life was never supposed prosper on Mars. Especially human life. Also, what does it mean to be human. This book is has philosophical and emotional tones that weave an interesting narrative. I definitely enjoyed the deep thoughts this provoked and recommend a listen.

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
  • BT
  • 03-16-19

An interesting concept

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

This book seems to answer the question, "what if a Vulcan told a story?"

In the not too, too, distant future humans have sent colonists to Mars to carve out an existence and get settlements ready for future colonists. Unfortunately, that was before Earth fell on desperate times. The Mars population is small, and Earth is no longer responding to messages. Worst of all, the children of the colonists are different, very different.

So, whats good about this book? Well, a lot really. It is well thought out, well written and well narrated. It is an interesting story about the fate of the human race, when the human race doesn't seem to exist any longer. Most of the characters are complex. The situations are believable. The story flows fluently and progresses organically. It is truly a good book about the beginnings of space exploration and colonization of other planets.

What makes it only a 3 star book? Well, everything else. My comment about the Vulcan derives from the fact that the story is told from the POV of one of the children of the colonists. The first true Martian. Unfortunately, the main character acts as a a hypocritical Vulcan. She hides all emotion, and tries to only show logic all of the time. Even her inner monologue describes everything in a emotionless monotone. What this does, is leave the story flat. Once all emotion has been drained out of a situation, what you are left with is a text book. It makes a good source for information, but makes for a less than exciting read.

The Vulcan like main character does, of course, have emotions, but denies they exist and the story is really about her journey to find her humanity. And for this, I applaud the author. But as there are stories within the stories, which are told in the same bland monotone, This makes sense in the narrative, as the stories are supposed to be the recounting of the story by the main character. However, as this is all supposed to be past tense, it would be more compelling if there was more emotional weight to the events.

There are some minor technical errors though out, but they do little to take away from the overall story. However, the main character is very hypocritical in her dealings with others, for example, she mentally chastises the original colonists for "wasting words, like they cost nothing." when they state the obvious. The fact that she constantly does this, herself, though out the book is fairly annoying. It could be used to show that she really IS human, as hypocrisy is human trait. However, I don't get the impression that was the authors intention.

The work by Jennifer Jill Araya is well done. However, as she was forced to speak like a robot through most of the book, its hard to tell what kind of range she has.

All in all, a good book, but it lacks the emotional depth that would have made it gripping. Very good concept and well planned out, though.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Odd and endearing

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

Overall I enjoyed this, there were some odd points or hangups, but I ended up finding them more endearing to the book than a problem.

Avoiding spoilers this book takes place on Mars, with an end of the world style backdrop. They're trying to find ways to survive and come to grips with their life on Mars.

I'd call this more a character piece in a Sci-Fi setting than a straight Sci-Fi novel. I got a far better feel for the characters than I did for the overall world, not a problem per-say by different from other Sci-FI novels.

The narrator is great, varied voices, and makes for an enjoyable listen.

If you're looking for a change of pace, while maintaining the Sci-Fi setting this would be a great pick-up.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Rose
  • 03-19-19

Somebody’s been watching too much ‘Star Trek’

This is a very painful poignant book and not half bad. The performance given is excellent and just right for this book. The reader seems to connect with the central character so that you feel what she feels through the voice of the reader. However while the book isn’t half bad it is way far from perfect. There are two things I find irritating about it. There’s the usual quite unimaginative delivery of dialogue but we’ve been there before and the other i this. The central character is made up of fifty percent woman and fifty percent man which makes ehr human so where do all these difference come from? Why the constant insistance on ehr not being human? Considering the company she keeps is mainly human one wonders why she is so different unless there awas life on mars before the colony got there in which case merlin might well be the father of the central character but the mother must have then been Marsian or otherwise the story of how different she is including lacking a real sense of humour, doesn’t work. Also there are times when she sounds not far off a computer giving orders and specific facts which is kind of irritating. her story though is very real and very poignant as I have already stated. Overall, not a bad read.