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Editorial Reviews

With multiple awards under his belt, including an AudioFile Magazine Golden Voice and Booklist's "Voice of Choice", narrator Dion Graham does not disappoint with his effortless performance of this story from the New York Times Magazine, adapted from Dave Eggers' novel The Circle. Mae has an enviable job at a social networking company, and slowly, she becomes seduced by a culture of constant updates and a seemingly unlimited chain of social connections. Graham fully engages listeners' attention with his attention to realism, and he works in subtle nuances of menace as Mae discovers the dark side of always being connected.

Publisher's Summary

A million people, a billion, wanted to be where Mae was at this moment, entering this atrium, 30 feet high and shot through with California light, on her first day working for the only company that really mattered at all.

A story from The New York Times Magazine, adapted from The Circle, a new novel by Dave Eggers.

Listen to the rest of The Circle and listen to more from The New York Times.

©2013 The New York Times Company (P)2013 The New York Times Company

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3.6 out of 5.0
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Performance

  • 3.8 out of 5.0
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Story

  • 3.6 out of 5.0
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  • David
  • Houston, TX, United States
  • 10-26-13

My kind of horror story

Half way through this chilling story my skin began to crawl. Vampires, zombies and Cthulu have never really done it for me, but this modern tale of true believers in a technologically unlimited world will keep me awake tonight. Eggers engineers a flawlessly incremental slide into smiling, wide-eyed hell, and Dion Graham rings the perfect notes of mindless sincerity to turn your stomach and whiten your knuckles during the ride.

17 of 17 people found this review helpful

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  • Janae
  • LAWRENCEVILLE, GA, United States
  • 10-01-13

I was taken aback

What did you love best about We Like You So Much and Want to Know You Better?

The summary of the story was accurate, but did not give justice to this short story; filled with mental and voyeuristic action. Loved it!

Who was your favorite character and why?

Mae. I identified with how she was comfortable keeping her thoughts and actions to herself, but was challenged later on in the story.

What about Dion Graham’s performance did you like?

I was taken aback by how fast he was talking, at first.. But, as I kept listening, his delivery made perfect sense. I wasn't ready, but he kept my attention with every word he spoke.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Absolutely!

Any additional comments?

More, please!

11 of 11 people found this review helpful

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a chilling and interesting book

wao well, it was pretty harmless at the beginning but damn poor may, I mean i understood she worked for a tech company but party points and everything shared? I mean, I understand thats how society is working at rhisbpoint but that you really dont have a choice over that and should do it, was like people really think like that? damn for me it was scary to know that kind of possible train of thought.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Interesting...

Not what I was expecting. It is an interesting take on technology and social interactions. Of course its just a preview, but I will probably end up getting the full book to see what happens.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Modern Modernity

What did you love best about We Like You So Much and Want to Know You Better?

Eggers offers a haunting look at technology and it's affect on us with "We Like You So Much and Want to Know You Better". I listened with little to no knowledge of what the actual story was. What I got from it at first, seemed like a coming of age story, later it morphed into a sort of modern societal drama.

If you’ve listened to books by Dave Eggers before, how does this one compare?

I've read/am reading Eggers and this story was refreshingly different. It's a short story, and as such requires a different sort of storytelling to have an impact. If you go into this expecting the "stream of consciousness" narrative normally provided. You might be disappointed.

What does Dion Graham bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

I enjoyed Dion's performance because he didn't intentionally change the tone of the surroundings as the story became more subversive. There was a very... almost awkward normality to his method that added to the creep factor. The strangest moments were made even more odd, not because the conversation intensified, but rather because it remained so matter of fact.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Show us what you know.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Compelling (disturbingly so!) Short Story

Wow!

I listened to this short in two sittings....and found that every single scene, every single detail mattered to the conclusion. The plot evoked disturbing realities (in a very humorous way) of our "connected" world. Made me think!

The plot worked amazingly well. I was impressed with the depth of characterization (especially as this was a short), the pacing, the secondary characters. I think I'll enjoy it every bit as much a second time through....which I may very well get to sometime in the future. It deserved five stars THAT much.

Highly recommended.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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An Interesting Intro to The Circle.

This is an introduction to the book The Circle which will be released as a movie this month.

Mae, with the help of a friend, got invited to interview for a job at the prestigious company known as The Circle. She is thrilled to get the position and is promptly pulled into training. She is provided with the latest technology phone and tablet and a helpful coworker immediately sets them up so that everything is interactive with the company. As a new employee she is soon provided with clothes, shown all the onsite store and facilities that are available, and introduced to her onsite lodgings, so she doesn’t have to go home for anything.

Although she picks the work up quickly, at the end of the week she is approached by some of her ‘support group’ who express concerns about her lack of socializing with her “team”. She changes her online socializing to spend hours online to increase her socializing ratings.

I didn’t realize as I listened to this that it is just the introduction to the full novel. The author quickly sets the stage for a creepy situation where Mae’s life is immersed in, and manipulated by, The Circle. This clearly raises issues of giving up control and privacy. I found the premise interesting and am curious to know where the story goes and what creates the suspense/thriller elements. On the other hand, I was not so pulled in that I wanted to push through over 500 pages. There was some unnecessary bad language liberally used by Mae’s friend. I liked getting a glimpse of the setting and Mae’s character. I will be waiting for the movie.

Audio Notes: Dion Graham's narration fits well with the high tech sort of energy of the story. He reads at a quick, sharp pace that captures the 20 something excitement of the protagonist. He manages to capture the variety of male and female voices with youthful enthusiasm. The narration is definitely a good fit for the book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Interesting short novel

Gives you something to mull over about current social media views and our tendency to share details. Quick storyline, great narration.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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just read it

What made the experience of listening to We Like You so Much and Want to Know You Better the most enjoyable?

I found this for free on Audible and was was not disappointed. At first I thought it was primarily about organizational culture and then saw the correlation with our current world and social media.

What was one of the most memorable moments of We Like You so Much and Want to Know You Better?

The main character is interrogated about her personal interests and the evidence of those interests. We tend to have this, "if there's no photo it didn't happen," concept regarding major events and social media. One of her coworkers stated, "I'm not a psychologist but..." which made me think how everyone has become an "expert."

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Interesting listen!

It was interesting to listen to this book and get an insight to how modern technology companies work, and what they may place a value on.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Sweetestmoondust
  • 01-24-15

thought making

a really thought prevoking story. I really enjoyed it and would recommend it to any one like me who is a geek freak.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 09-23-16

Fascinating

I cannot wait to read Waiting for Autumn as I was captivated the whole way through.

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  • hazanne
  • 06-04-16

consummerism

Enlightened story about how an innocent young girl is manipulated into the mass market consumption that is frighteningly current.

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  • Katy
  • 10-22-15

Yeah, good story 👍

This was good and fun. Thought provoking etc
I felt like It ended very suddenly probably because I was enjoying it so much.
Worth. A listen :-)

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  • UsefulThings
  • 05-08-15

1984 type short for the age of social media

An enjoyable short story about where social media is taking us.

The narration was pretty good, and I enjoyed the way the characters were brought across.
I will be looking into listening to "The Circle", which this was adapted from.

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