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Publisher's Summary

Audie Award Finalist, Literary Fiction, 2014

Soon to be a TV Series on AMC starring Pierce Brosnan and co-written by Philipp Meyer.

The critically acclaimed, New York Times bestselling epic, a saga of land, blood, and power that follows the rise of one unforgettable Texas family from the Comanche raids of the 1800s to the oil booms of the 20th century.

Part epic of Texas, part classic coming-of-age story, part unflinching examination of the bloody price of power, The Son is a gripping and utterly transporting novel that maps the legacy of violence in the American west with rare emotional acuity, even as it presents an intimate portrait of one family across two centuries.

Eli McCullough is just twelve-years-old when a marauding band of Comanche storm his Texas homestead and brutally murder his mother and sister, taking him as a captive. Despite their torture and cruelty, Eli—against all odds—adapts to life with the Comanche, learning their ways, their language, taking on a new name, finding a place as the adopted son of the chief of the band, and fighting their wars against not only other Indians, but white men, too-complicating his sense of loyalty, his promised vengeance, and his very understanding of self. But when disease, starvation, and westward expansion finally decimate the Comanche, Eli is left alone in a world in which he belongs nowhere, neither white nor Indian, civilized or fully wild.

Deftly interweaving Eli's story with those of his son, Peter, and his great-granddaughter, JA, The Son deftly explores the legacy of Eli's ruthlessness, his drive to power, and his life-long status as an outsider, even as the McCullough family rises to become one of the richest in Texas, a ranching-and-oil dynasty of unsurpassed wealth and privilege.

Harrowing, panoramic, and deeply evocative, The Son is a fully realized masterwork in the greatest tradition of the American canon-an unforgettable novel that combines the narrative prowess of Larry McMurtry with the knife edge sharpness of Cormac McCarthy.

©2013 Philipp Meyer (P)2013 HarperCollinsPublishers

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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Such an addictive listen. Great characters.

This is a very addictive listen. The characters are great and I love how the story is told from each song perspective with is naturally different considering each role

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Sad reminder of history and loss, leaves one

wondering why we have continued to conquer. I read to escape not to shed tears.

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  • Craig
  • Austin, TX, USA
  • 07-12-17

Great historical fiction book and performance

I've been an audible member for 10 years or more and this would rank in the top five audiobooks I have listen to through the service.

It's a very intricate, complex, and thought-provoking story that provides a context for much of how the modern era came to be. Caution, not for the squeamish listener.

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Two hours was all I could take.

Would you try another book from Philipp Meyer and/or the narrators?

Author: No<br/>Narrators: Yes

What was most disappointing about Philipp Meyer’s story?

So many, many, many words - so little, little, little story.

Which scene was your favorite?

It must have happened after I turned it off.

You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

It is returnable.

Any additional comments?

An abridged version MIGHT have been better.

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Great read

started watching the series and after a few episodes was not enjoying the TV version. so I reread the book for the second time and it was still as riveting as the first time.

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Stand out Endeavor

This was a great book. It was interesting, detailed but never boring, and the dialog was well written. The narration was perfect. I really can't find anything bad to say about it. GET IT!

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Well written, well told

This book was not a genre I normally choose, but I enjoyed it. The cast of narrators did a great job! The ending left me wanting a little more.

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Name Me Someone That's not a Parasite

I do not feel worthy of reviewing this piece which is by far the best novel I've read since Skagboys. Philpp M. makes Irvine Welsh look like Trump tweeting. He's like the impossible love child of Quentin Tarantino and Cormac McCarthy. I'm not gay but like Bob Weir, I would. This book flooded me with memories of family secrets told too late to make a difference. Like when I was dying from addiction and someone finally told me about my sweet Mormon grandmother who before the Latter Day Saint days would put down two fifths of vodka, storm off and come back two weeks later threatening to kill gramps with her new boyfriend from the bar. It finally made sense now mom moved to LA to be near her boyfriend's prison. It had every thing I love including nihilism and overwhelming depression and existential morose at the uselessness of life and knowing that since the Clovis people man has been stealing land from others and nothing exists of any of our predecessors who weren't poisoning the land, sky and sea.

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stick with it.

it took a bit to figure out how it was all connected, but then it was really good.

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Just How Drastic Can Humankind Be?

The Son, written by Philipp Meyer, narrated by Will Patton, Kate Mulgrew , Scott Shepherd, and Clifton Collins Jr. This is a story of nihilation. Or, if you rather, the ability of each individual man, and therein each individual society, to obliterate itself, and from its ashes, metamorphize into its next embodiment. This is BOTH Hegelian and Nietzchen in philosophy. Examples: Friedrich Hegel taught us; each event tends to be replaced by an opposite, which is later replaced by a resolution of the two extremes. Fredrick Nietzsche has said; he who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster, and if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you. You will need to know of those philosophies to understand the tale being told.

This book tells the story of what happens when countervailing forces convulse and how all life is a drastic conflict.

The story takes place in post Mexican Texas, and continues into the present day. It is told in short episodes each such chapter telling happenings in the life of one of three individuals from three distinct generations of a typical Texan oligarchic family. The related episodes are intermixed, hopping from the progenitor, to the granddaughter to the son, back and forth. One would think that makes the book difficult to follow. That is not true, it is easy and entertaining to track. The ugliness of the family progenitor, the weakness of his son, and the vicissitudes of their third generation who in this novel is a woman taking on modernity, are amazingly interesting, and supremely harsh.

This is a masterful Texas story, where we find no one is without evil. No one. Those we have sympathy for, are only getting their fair share of what they deserve, and those that are heinous we come to understand. A truly unique study into humanity.

Exciting, involving, and literate. This is a book for the ages. If you find value in Fyodor Dostoyevsky's The Brothers Karamazov, this is a read for you. If you were excited reading Cormac McCarthy”s Blood Meridian, this is the book for you.