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Publisher's Summary

The first two decades of the 20th century were a time of promise and innocence in America. Hardworking immigrants could achieve the American dream; heroes were truly heroic. Eric Rolfe Greenberg brilliantly and authentically chronicles the real-life saga of the first national baseball hero, Christy Mathewson, and the fictional story of a Jewish immigrant family of jewelers. In this audio, Mathewson and other great players like John McGraw, Honus Wagner, and Connie Mack discover the realities behind the shining illusions: the burdens of being a hero and the temptations that taint success.

©1983 Eric Rolfe Greenberg (P)2014 Audible Inc.

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Great speaker not so great book.

Couldn't have made it through the book without this audio book version. The speaker makes it interesting and bearable.

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  • jwmnatl
  • Atlanta, GA United States
  • 04-21-16

For any fan of baseball history

An excellent work of baseball fiction that weaves in true accounts of Christy Matheson's first no-hitter in 1901, the Giants' pennant and World Series snub of 1904, the crazy finish in 1908, the 1912 Series, and climaxing with the Black Sox Series of 1919. Bronson Pinchot is a wonderful narrator, though he did mispronounced the names of Eddie Cicotte and Napoleon Lajoie. A+