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Publisher's Summary

In 1945, Elsie Schmidt is a naive teenager, as eager for her first sip of champagne as she is for her first kiss. She and her family have been protected from the worst of the terror and desperation overtaking her country by a high-ranking Nazi who wishes to marry her. So when an escaped Jewish boy arrives on Elsie’s doorstep in the dead of night on Christmas Eve, Elsie understands that opening the door would put all she loves in danger.

Sixty years later, in El Paso, Texas, Reba Adams is trying to file a feel-good Christmas piece for the local magazine. Reba is perpetually on the run from memories of a turbulent childhood, but she’s been in El Paso long enough to get a full-time job and a fianc, Riki Chavez. Riki, an agent with the U.S. Border Patrol, finds comfort in strict rules and regulations, whereas Reba feels that lines are often blurred.

Reba’s latest assignment has brought her to the shop of an elderly baker across town. The interview should take a few hours at most, but the owner of Elsie’s German Bakery is no easy subject. Reba finds herself returning to the bakery again and again, anxious to find the heart of the story. For Elsie, Reba’s questions are a stinging reminder of darker times: her life in Germany during that last bleak year of WWII. And as Elsie, Reba, and Riki’s lives become more intertwined, all are forced to confront the uncomfortable truths of the past and seek out the courage to forgive.

©2012 Sarah McCoy (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
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Performance

  • 4.4 out of 5.0
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Story

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
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  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Stevon
  • Tempe, AZ, United States
  • 03-15-15

great story

First time author for me. My wife and I listened to this together and both thought it was great. It was well crafted in how the author went back and forth from Garmisch, Germany during the war to present day El Paso, TX and sometimes in between, telling the story of the different characters at the different times. There were parallels during the different times but an overriding there was forgiveness and forgiving oneself. It was a very touching story and I recommend it highly. I read one review as I started the book where the reviewer commented that World War II themes were getting worn out and I disagree with that statement. There were so many different aspects to that war, the different stories that can come out of that dreadful event will likely never stop. Enjoy

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

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  • Daryl
  • Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
  • 01-03-15

Two intertwining stories

What did you like best about this story?

I liked Elsie's story much better than Reba's; I couldn't understand Reba's motivations, but Elsie's progression was natural.

Any additional comments?

I do agree with one reviewer that Reba as a character was really self-involved, and I couldn't understand why Ricky would put up with her. I loved Elsie as a character, because she cut through all the crap and got right down to business.<br/>Elisabeth Rodgers was a good narrator, though I found her German pronunciation was clunky in places.<br/><br/>This is a worthwhile read, intertwining, bittersweet, and well-done.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Debbie
  • Toney, Alabama
  • 06-10-15

All that's Ugly About War & a Big Dose of Courage

One of the best WWII stories yet, written about a normal German family who owns and runs a bakery and is trying to survive during the war . . . the story takes place in beautiful Garmisch, Germany, surrounded by the Bavarian Alps and where just a few years earlier, in 1936, the winter Olympics were held. Now, in 1945, it's a different Germany and a different world . . . Elsie, the youngest daughter of the baker, just seventeen years old is invited to her first Nazi ball . . . her parents are so proud . . . and a tiny young Jewish boy, brought out of the concentration camp to entertain the Nazis, sings like an angel at the ball . . . what a voice!!! Are they really going to send that boy back? Elsie begins a journey that Christmas Eve that changes her life forever . . . no longer a naive girl, the choices she makes may cost her everything. This is a well written story, correlating between two time frames, the 1940s and sixty years later in El Paso, Texas. It boils the brutal truths of war down to simple choices that each person makes, one day at a time. Shows us that we each have a responsibility, even when the whole situation seems enormous and out of our control. That if we each do what we can, when we can, it really does matter. This book will stay with me for a very long time.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Decent story ruined by the performer.

What made the experience of listening to The Baker's Daughter the most enjoyable?

The alternating between two character and two different times in history was very effective.

Would you be willing to try another one of Elisabeth Rodgers’s performances?

No. Never. I found her performance to be overly dramatic. Enough with the high school drama school voices. Just read the story, for crying out loud. If you can't do accents that sound authentic, please don't do them at all.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

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Decent Book

I really enjoyed Elsie's story. I thought it was fascinating. I would give those sections of the book 5 stars. I just couldn't get into the character of Reba, though. She annoyed me to no end and after a short while I found it torture listening to her sections of the book. I found her story boring and rather pointless.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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I was sad to say goodbye to these characters

It's been a long time since I've read a book and been sad to have it end. I loved getting to know the characters in this book. The narrator did a great job of reading and I enjoyed every minute. So sad to have it come to an end!

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Soulless. Artless.

The form and shape of a story driven by emotion and a series of events tied together.

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Enticing

Where does The Baker's Daughter rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

This is a well written, narrated nicely audiobook.

What other book might you compare The Baker's Daughter to and why?

The Lost Wife by Alyson Richman. These poignant novels are above the tragedies and triumphs of World War II and the Holocaust.

Which scene was your favorite?

I particularly enjoyed Elsie's account of her life as a young Baker's daughter in Germany.<br/>This is a different point of view I hadn't encountered before. The war from the prospective of an everyday German citizen.

If you could rename The Baker's Daughter, what would you call it?

<br/>Bread of Life

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Marvelous story

It's hard to find a book of this caliber. I wish every novel I read was this rich and well told. Also, the narrator did a fantastic job. It was a sad story with a happy ending.

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  • jo6
  • Worcester, MA United States
  • 10-04-16

Great read!

Loved this book. The audio version was perfectly read as well adding to the impact. McCoy's characters have great depth. Can't wait to read next offering!