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Publisher's Summary

In 1939 in the small, rural community of Augusta Falls, Georgia, 12-year-old Joseph Vaughan learns of the brutal assault and murder of a young girl, the first in a series of killings that will plague the community over the next decade. Joseph and his friends are determined to protect the town from the evil in their midst and they form "the Guardians" to watch over the community. But the murderer evades them and they watch helplessly as one child after another is taken. Even when the killings cease, a shadow of fear follows Joseph and, 50 years later, he must confront the nightmare.
©2009 R. J. Ellory Publications Ltd (P)2009 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Critic Reviews

"There aren't nearly enough beautifully written novels that are also great mysteries. Like The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and Smilla's Sense of Snow, A Quiet Belief in Angels is one of them." (James Patterson)
"A Quiet Belief in Angels is a beautiful and haunting book. This is a tour de force from R. J. Ellory." (Michael Connelly)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4 out of 5 stars
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    20
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    9
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Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    18
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    9
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Story

  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

One my Top 5 Audio listens of all time.

If Gillian Flynn and James Lee Burke had a kid that grew up a writer, this might be the book produced. Beautifully written with a storyline that kept me guessing until the final pages. Ended all to quickly. Dave Robicheaux in a period piece and a plotline that extends the length of his lifetime.

Narrator gets a 10/10 and is a top 5 narration as well, ranking with Stephen Hoye in Skinny Dip and McKintys books read by Gerald Doyle


If you like Burke, Connolly, Gillian Flynn, or Stieg Larsson you will be pleased to have downloaded this book!


5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Over a year later and story still sticks with me

I'm writing this review almost 2 years after listening to this book. I have recommended to it many who don't want to read or listen because they say "I'm not religious." This is far from a religious story and has nothing to do with it. This story of the childhood and growing up of a young man in the South with the background of a serial killer is unusual. After finishing this listen I wanted to read something about the author and his story was quite a jolt. It is probably best not to read about the author until after listening to the book because you'll be amazed at his own story and wonder how and why he wrote this.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Rich0
  • Renton, WA
  • 12-13-16

I would have given two credits for this book!

From start to finish this book gave me a hunger to not stop listening till I was done.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Beautifully written story.

I you just want a fast paced thriller with tons of action and cracker dialogue then this book is not for you. This is more of a literary journey for both the writer and the main character - also a writer, Joseph Vaughan. Much of the prose is quite beautiful with one sentence forming a complete paragraph and where punctuation is all important. The performance of this beautiful prose was an outstanding effort by Mark Bramhall, an actor who I had not heard of before, but who I will look for again. I relished this book and each word written and because of the excellent writing, I did not want it to end. I highly recommend this book to all readers who love GOOD books.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Annoying doesn't begin to describe this book.

What would have made A Quiet Belief in Angels better?

Heavy, heavy, editing.

Would you recommend A Quiet Belief in Angels to your friends? Why or why not?

Not at all. After the first couple of hours the listener starts developing an uncontrollable tic when he hears a synonym, redundancy,or hackneyed phrase. Then, certain events described will bring on nausea and will have to stop listening before the killer is revealed. Don't worry, you can probably guess and save yourself the suffering.

What does Mark Bramhall bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

He does great accents and is an excellent narrator.. I hope he got paid a lot.

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from A Quiet Belief in Angels?

Sex with the teacher is one of many.

Any additional comments?

Whats with the glowing reviews of this book? Michael Conelley? Jonathan Kellerman? Really?

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Cheers for Ellory

A well-written book that captures your imagination and keeps you guessing until the very end. Ellory uses words in a way that brings the characters to life and pulls you in. A tragic story with a morsel of hope. If you like using your brain...you'll love this story. The narration is excellent. Five cheers for Ellory.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • C
  • newport beach, CA, United States
  • 07-18-12

For god's sake tell the story

Literary pretensions, endless internal dialogue, does not make for easy listening. If you want to be Joyce or Faulkner then please inform us up front. But, if you are going to tell a story, then this endless, boring,ridiculous, psychologizing,self-spelunking internal discourse is just plain annoying. This would have made an excellent story at one- third its length.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
  • greg
  • sarasota, FL, United States
  • 09-10-11

Ineffectual whining

I feel that I've been subjected to 15 + hours of ineffectual whining. I had just finished A Simple Act of Violence and had been mightily impressed by Mr Ellory. This book is a diametric opposite from the former and I'm stunned that they were written by the same author.

My advise is that unless you have difficulty sleeping avoid this drivel.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars

Repetitious and longwinded

This would have been an excellent book if the ruminations and inner dialogue of the protagonist had been cut by about 2/3. I found this aspect of the book repetitious and exhausting. I stayed with it only because I was curious as to how this murder mystery would turn out.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Does this guy think he's Steinbeck? (He's not!)

What an ordeal! I got through the first 1/3 of this, which is little more than another Southern hardscrabble yarn - the father has croaked, the mother has to find how to make ends meet (she beds the neighbor while accepting soup and sausage from his wife), the boy goes to a one-room school where his teacher encourages him to write (then later sleeps with him), and there's usual redneck stereotypes we've all seen a hundred times before. Along the way, several little girls are killed - but the story generally plods along at the speed of pluff mud. By 1/3 in I had solved the "mystery" of who is the killer, and decided I should start fast-forwarding and sampling, because this was one sloooww freight. In so doing, the kid gets wrongly convicted of murder and sent to the slammer for a long time, but he's very philosophical about it. Don't ya just luv those Southern accents? Unable to take the pain anymore, I skipped to the last few chapters where the now young man gets out of prison and the killer of the little girls comes to town. By the way, did I tell you I was right about who the killer was? Just so you know, I recently listened to an earlier detective thriller by this author and it was GREAT! Titled "A Simple Act of Violence". Really! Forget this turkey and go use your precious credit on the better book.

5 of 9 people found this review helpful