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Editorial Reviews

Editors Select, April 2013 - I knew I always liked The Great Gatsby, but having not read it since high school, I couldn’t remember exactly why. After listening to Jake Gyllenhaal’s superb narration, I was reminded of what I found so great about F. Scott Fitzgerald’s classic. Gyllenhaal strikes the right chord as, Nick Carraway, who exists within the hyper-privileged world of Long Island’s upper crust but manages to avoid becoming jaded and swept up by the materialism of his cousin, Daisy, and the titular Gatsby. Fitzgerald’s elegant yet simple prose still holds up, and Gyllenhaal treats it with the utmost respect, allowing the vivid descriptions of mansions, landmarks, and 1920s New York to flow at just the right pace. While ultimately tragic, The Great Gatsby is full of light and beautiful moments that kindle a nostalgia for the Roaring Twenties, and I was glad to have been reintroduced to a favorite book this way.

Publisher's Summary

Audie Award Finalist, Classic, 2013

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s classic American novel of the Roaring Twenties is beloved by generations of readers and stands as his crowning work. This new audio edition, authorized by the Fitzgerald estate, is narrated by Oscar-nominated actor Jake Gyllenhaal (Brokeback Mountain). Gyllenhaal's performance is a faithful delivery in the voice of Nick Carraway, the Midwesterner turned New York bond salesman, who rents a small house next door to the mysterious millionaire Jay Gatsby. There, he has a firsthand view of Gatsby’s lavish West Egg parties - and of his undying love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan.

After meeting and losing Daisy during the war, Gatsby has made himself fabulously wealthy. Now, he believes that his only way to true happiness is to find his way back into Daisy’s life, and he uses Nick to try to reach her. What happens when the characters’ fantasies are confronted with reality makes for a startling conclusion to this iconic masterpiece.

This special audio edition joins the upcoming film - as well as many other movie, radio, theater, and even video-game adaptations - as a fitting tribute to the cultural significance of Fitzgerald’s Jazz Age classic, widely regarded as one of the greatest stories ever told.

©1925 Charles Scribner's Sons. Copyright renewed 1953 by Frances Scott Fitzgerald Lanahan (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

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  • Lilac
  • South Portland, ME
  • 03-13-17

A classic!

I have read this book several times. I get more from it with each reading but Jake Guylenhall's narration was especially enjoyable. It was as if Nick Carraway came over and personally told me the story. I will listen to this recording again and again.

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English class/10

[these are extra words for the sake of having words in the body so I can post something]

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A classic

It's a classic. What can I say about it that a few generations of literary scholars couldn't? Most people my age read this either as part of a high school or college English course but for whatever reason I managed to avoid encountering it throughout my academic life. So at some point when I had a large road trip coming up I decided to download it and listen to it in just a couple sittings.

The plot and characters are so well known after the last century that I don't really know what I can say about it that won't just be summing up common knowledge. But in general this is one of those classic books that is more striking because of the language and legacy rather than the intricacies of the plot. The plot is actually the most straightforward part about the book in my opinion, but Fitzgerald is a master of language, and it's a beautifully poetic type of book.

As far as the audio performance goes. I didn't really know what to expect with Jake Gyllenhall doing the narration, but I was pleasantly surprised. I thought he did an excellent job and his voice fit my mental impression of Nick Carraway just about perfectly.

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A true masterpiece

A singular masterpiece that has no equal. I can't believe I waited this long to enjoy it.

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Great Narration

It painted a better picture than when I read the book it was quite fantastic.

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Wonderful narration

I have listened to this book multiple times and every time I enjoy it more and more. I would definitely consider purchasing more books narrated by Jake Gyllenhaal. I feel that he brought to life a story that I love and definitely look forward to more.

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Monotone

Where does The Great Gatsby rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Probably in the middle because it is such a great story

What other book might you compare The Great Gatsby to and why?

Huck Finn a banned book classic

Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Jake Gyllenhaal?

Anyone

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

The Great Gatsby

Any additional comments?

Crapy Monotone reader

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The Great Gatsby is Beautifully Written But…

For starters, I think it’s important to know that I have never seen any of the Gatsby movies. This was my first reading/listen of The Great Gatsby, so I come into this with fresh eyes. The writing was beautiful. Fitzgerald does a superb job with description and has a way with words that paints a very vivid picture that helps move the story along and keep it entertaining. The story itself was okay, offering a look into the past and the wealthy of the 1920’s (although it came across a bit preachy at times, which felt hypocritical considering Fitzgerald’s own personal story.) The narrator seems a little disgusted with the wealthy people that surround him and eventually removes himself from that scene in the end, but it made him feel one-dimensional. For someone who tends to look down on the morally deprived characters that surround him, why does he continue to keep company with them, old sport? Lol. All of the characters here seem flat for the most part, especially Gatsby and Daisy. The entire novel revolves around a love between these two that is never presented to us as readers in any thoughtful way. I would have rather seen a flashback to their early romance so I could have felt something for them in any way. In the end, what should have been tragic felt more like just another scene that happens within the story. Don’t get me wrong. I like the idea of the story and it is pieced together well for the most part, but it needed more character development to make the ending draw out some sort of feeling from me one way or another. As it stands, all of the major players get exactly what they deserve in my opinion, except for maybe Tom. He was an ass throughout and still ends up with a prize (Daisy) that he doesn’t even care for. Perhaps Fitzgerald was going for realism here. At any rate, it’s definitely worth reading and I will be checking out more of Fitzgerald’s work in the future.

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a good reminder to not chase after materialism

This book depicts people running around and chasing after hollow things like money and popularity, and at the expense of things that really matter. It made me stop and think about my own motivations and direction. Am I chasing that green light, without realizing it sometimes?

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Worth a listen

Forced read in high school. Not a fan. College now - listened to this on the elliptical. A much better story.