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Publisher's Summary

The Apology of Socrates, by Plato, is the dialogue that presents the speech of legal self-defense, which Socrates presented at his trial for corruption in 399 BC.

Specifically, The Apology of Socrates is a defense against the charges of "corrupting the young" and "not believing in the gods which the city believes in, but in other gods which are unknown" to Athens.

The Apology of Socrates is the dialogue that depicts the trial, written by Plato, who details the final days of the philosopher Socrates.

This book has been carefully adapted into modern English to allow for easy listening.

©2017 James Harris (P)2017 James Harris

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Classic

Wonderfully done.
Reasons I enjoyed this audio book:
Witty, Wonderful character, Page-turner, Original, Realistic, Easy-to-read, Entertaining, Twisted, Informative.
This Audio book was given to me for free at my request from the publisher, author or narrator and I provided this unbiased voluntary review.

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Interesting Listen

The Greek mythos was never covered in my formal education, so I was very interested to explore this little piece of history. The explanation and argument that Socrates makes at his trial are both cogent and reasonable...and of course threatening to those who sit in power and hold opposing views. This rendition was accessible to modern ears and very easy to follow.

The narration is well done with a smooth and measured delivery.

I was voluntarily provided this free review copy audiobook by the author, narrator, or publisher.

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Interesting

I've always enjoyed learning about history and ancient Greece is one of the areas I studies in high school, although that seems like a very long time ago now. Of course you can't learn about ancient Greek history with learning about Socrates, but I've never read the Apology of Socrates so when I got the chance I jumped at it.

I found it really interesting, the style of logic that Socrates used was compelling and convincing for me. The modernization seem to have been done well.

The narration is good, the phrasing of the delivery is well done and the limited character voices were clear.

I received a free copy of this book from the author and/or narrator and/or publisher in exchange for an honest review.

If you found this review helpful would you please take a moment to click yes below.

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  • Kingsley
  • Henely Brook, Australia
  • 11-27-17

Apologia

Written by Plato, from the perspective of Socrates this is an 'apologia' - a reasoned defense of a position or action - not an apology - saying sorry -for holding those positions. Socrates is not recanting or apologising for holding his views, but is defending himself and explaining his positions. With modern language rarely using apology/apologia in this context it isn't immediately clear.

The short work covers the speeches given by Socrates at his trial (2500 year old spoiler: he is found guilty and executed), against the charges of corrupting the youth and atheism. The book covers his defense, his response to the verdict and his final statements before execution

As with all we know of Socrates, it comes as hearsay via Plato and is told in a question and answer 'Socratic method'. It is interesting and well reasoned, if short. A great way to get a good overview of Socrates, his style (or Plato's style, at least) and what he taught. Overall well worth the short investment of time.

Narration by Michael T Downey is fine. He is clear and well paced. I would have liked a little more effort in clarifying the back-and-forth questioning between multiple people - to keep it clear who was talking. At times he modified his voice to be a different 'character', but other times he didn't. Or minimally did. Overall, narration is good but nothing exciting. It does what it needs to, but doesn't go beyond that.

I was voluntarily provided this free review copy audiobook by the author, narrator, or publisher.

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I've Been There

Most people in their middle-ages or later who haven't been exposed to the text of The Apology of Socrates have nevertheless experienced what was described by Plato. I find the message somewhat similar to the advice Rudyard Kipling gave his son in his poem "If", and understand well his defense that what Socrates claims he lacks is "wisdom". At the end of a long life, it's easy to feel stupid in the presence of so many people who claim to "get it".

Confronted with a generation with different priorities that accuses him of an offense that can result in losing his life in a show-trial gone bad, he turns the tables on his accusers and takes what he considers the "high road";. Having attempted in his life to "build with worn-out tools", he is on the verge of fighting his last battle, one for his very life.

The result is either a loss or a win for Socrates, depending on your perspective, and that really is the take away message from this. Your perspective defines you. What you're willing to sacrifice your life for (albeit, your 80 year old life) defines you, and that some deaths are easier to tolerate than the life that results from evading your principles for the sake of survival.

I get him, and part of the credit goes to the people who translated the Apology into an English we all speak. It was easy to understand, and follow. Well done.

I received this recording for no cost on the condition that I would provide a review of it. I recommend it to those who require an easy to understand version of the Apology. I recommend it even more to those who'd benefit from confronting the questions Socrates confronted in his self-defense, in the hope that you'll draw enduring lessons from it.

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Self-examination of an examined life

This is a classic. A delicious piece of history, whether or not it is history.

Rewritten in an engaging way and narrated with an actor's flair, but without overdoing it. Really excellent production!

This is the version to start off with if you are not already a confirmed classicist.

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

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Be wary when antagonizing the status quo

I'm not very well versed in ancient philosophers but it is a topic I wish to learn more about. That's why I jumped at the opportunity to get a free copy of this audio book in exchange for my honest review, and I'm glad I did. It was a quick listen with good narration and I'm sure I'll revisit it in the future.

This was a great introduction to Plato's writings and the type of man Socrates might have been. He gave a clever, well reasoned defense and refused to back down or sacrifice his integrity even in the face of death. I think the moral of this story is to be wary when antagonizing the status quo. It can have dire consequences.

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Timeless youth

Nothing says the timeless plight of youth and enlightenment like the oldest and most conservative philosopher who shunned subjectivity and believed in a ruling class. Wait, what? Nothing about that sentence makes any sense. And yet here we are.

This contemporary version of The Apology of Socrates has all of the themes of a Summer of Love level of social disruption. Rejection of the state, rejection of the gods of your parents, corrupting the youth, attacking the lazy establishment, certainty of your own enlightenment, wit above decorum, and speaking truth to power. Socrates here is a one man rebellion. A Single revolutionary standing up to one of the most powerful governments in history and winning.

Without question, Socrates wins all rational arguments. However, he does not win his life which is also sadly common to revolutionaries. Established power does indeed have a tendency to be rather powerful.

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review.