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Publisher's Summary

William Dorrit has been a resident of the Marshalsea debtors prison for so many years that he has gained the nickname "The Father of the Marshalsea". However, his suffering is eased by his close bond with youngest daughter Amy, or "Little Dorrit".

The dashing Arthur Clennam, returning to London after many years in China, enters their lives, and the Dorrits' fortunes begin to rise and fall.

A biting satirical work on the shortcomings of 19th century government and society.

Public Domain (P)2008 Naxos Audiobooks

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Little Dorrit Narrated byAnton Lesser

Anton Lesser was great. But Charles Dickens sure knows how to talk around the subject and hardly ever get to the point of the subject or name of the person who is being talked about. As a listener you have to guess allot. The best part is when Amy talks. She is strait forward and understandable. All the other adults talk in circles. What 1-5 words would all be necessary, it seems 15-30 words were used. I suppose it's the way the rich talked in those days. But it's hard to follow. If someone talked to me that way, I'd get board and walk away or I'd say; get to the point and stop talking in riddles. Different conversations come and go and it's hard to follow the direction of the story. I tend to only follow the parts when they stop talking in circles.

2 of 11 people found this review helpful