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Publisher's Summary

The economic chaos that has created so much destruction of wealth for regular Americans is far from over. This book examines problems and possible solutions within national, international, and local realms that will help us navigate these times and set a course toward calmer waters. While some clamor for more taxes to cover our government's programs, The Next America shows how we can restructure our tax code so it positively affects all aspects of our communities: Education, businesses, innovation, political transparency, environmental issues, investments, and more. Concerned citizens and economic players alike will be inspired and motivated to act to reestablish the American Dream during this transitional time.

©2011 Don Allen Holbrook (P)2013 Don Allen Holbrook

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Boring political statements masked as wisdom

Would you try another book from Don Holbrook and/or Brian Daniel Young?

Not likely.

How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

Leave out the political and religious assertions as to cause and effect.

Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Brian Daniel Young?

The narrator seem OK, but the way it was narrated came across as "computer-like" vs human.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Religous

Would you try another book from Don Holbrook and/or Brian Daniel Young?

No

Has The Next America turned you off from other books in this genre?

No

Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Brian Daniel Young?

Yeah

Any additional comments?

This book is a lot more about religion, politics and philosophy then the title would imply. Almost 2 hours in I hardly heard anything specific about the American economy. I would recommend this book if your a Christian Libertarian looking to reenforce your world view or I suppose if your an Atheist Socialist looking to see what the other side is preaching.<br/><br/>While I didn't hate the book, I didn't like the narrator very much. I turned the thing off when he started talking about how America was established by the founding fathers as a Christian nation and would forever remain one. That bummed me out when I considered that it was also founded as a racist nation and the thought crossed my mind that maybe this guy didn't believe in progress.<br/><br/>

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Tim
  • United States
  • 03-05-15

Talking Out of His Rear

I'm not too keen on Don Holbrook's ideas in "The Next America." Some of his ideas are great, like regarding education, but most of his ideas are so far fetch that they will never come true. You can't rebuild America base on theories. There has to be action, reaction, and leadership and Don Holbrook is just talking out of his rear without any examples.

I almost couldn't finish this one. At one point, I had to stop and listen to something else because Brian Daniel Young speaks in waves. He is the worst reader that I have yet to listen to. Avoid his voice as much as possible. His vocal folds is poison.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Performance
  • Story

Absurd

What would have made The Next America better?

Holbrook not contradicting himself constantly! In part 1 he says the government patronizes citizens telling us we're too dumb to understand complicated subjects, so we should just trust them and also that the government should force conversion of all retirement funds, including pensions, to individually-managed accounts. Then by Part 3 he specifies areas such as energy strategy and health care where Americans are too uninformed and the concepts are too complicated so we need government czars to navigate and make the decisions for us. I agree with many of the issues he identifies and even half of the solutions he suggests but add the issue that Americans are generally too apathetic and spoiled to keep themselves informed and do not hold themselves accountable for their bad decisions.

Has The Next America turned you off from other books in this genre?

While this book is a bit out of touch with reality reading (sic) this kind of book is one way to expose yourself to fresh ideas & perspectives on complex issues we face as a society.

Would you listen to another book narrated by Brian Daniel Young?

Yes, the narrator was decent.

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

This book sparks frustration in me. The author shows that there are some innovative ideas to addressing complex and seemingly intractable challenges, but our society and our current political system can't even come close to being honest about the problems let alone make progress on them.

Any additional comments?

This book provides an interesting set of questions for our politicians and for us as citizens of the US and the world.

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Too much of a polemic

A few interesting (and somewhat over-specific) ideas on how to spur certain types of economic development advances but over-all far too conclusory. Just throws some of his basic assumptions out there as unassailable truths and expects the reader to agree. Slightly refreshing that he is not 100% righty or lefty (though you could find examples of both) but he still states his considered approaches as the only way.

He might be more interesting to hear on a panel featuring a wide range of views to understand how different tendencies approach different problems