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Publisher's Summary

Millions of families are affected by eating disorders, which usually strike young women between the ages of fourteen and twenty. But current medical practice ties these families' hands when it comes to helping their children recover. Conventional medical wisdom dictates separating the patient from the family and insists that 'it's not about the food', even as a family watches a child waste away before their eyes. In Brave Girl Eating Harriet Brown describes how her family, with the support of an open-minded pediatrician and a therapist, helped her daughter recover from anorexia using a family-based treatment developed at the Maudsley Hospital in London. Chronicling her daughter Kitty's illness from the earliest warning signs, through its terrifying progression, and on toward recovery, Brown takes us on one family's journey into the world of anorexia nervosa, where starvation threatened her daughter's body and mind. Brave Girl Eating is essential listening for families and professionals alike, a guiding light for anyone who's coping with this devastating disease.

©2010 Harriet Brown (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Mom/RN
  • San Antonio, TX
  • 03-05-15

informative

as a nursing student I find the patient perspective invaluable and appreciate anyone willing to share their experience. an interesting, informative thought provoking listen!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Must-listen for anyone touched by anorexia

This book is a MUST read for anyone whose family member or friend is diagnosed with anorexia (or suspects it). My dear friend's daughter was just diagnosed and their closest family friends are all reading the book in order to better support, encourage, and sympathize with their deeply challenging journey on the road to recovery. The author includes not only memoir, but also sprinkles in interesting and helpful data, facts and history on the condition. Very well written, too. Cannot recommend highly enough. It will help families dealing with this feel less alone and will offer a helpful alternative to sending a child away from home for treatment--one that seems to be more effective.

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Should be required reading for anyone with a daughter

An absolutely outstanding book. The real life account from the mother’s perspective does a great job at helping to understand the disease, the torment it inflicts on the sufferer and the family challenges of dealing with it. It also makes you feel like “we are not alone in dealing with this”. So thankful to the author.

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great book for understanding anorexia

this book is a must if you have someone that you love that is struggling with anorexia. thank you to the author for putting it out there for everyone.

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Must read

This is one of the best eating disorder books I have read. This story shows the true ups and downs of eating disorder recover and the impact the disorder has on the family. I recommend this book if you want to learn more about treatment and recovery as it impacts not only the individual with an individual, but to those surrounding her as well.

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Wept thru the entire book, as a husband of 20 yrs

anorexic\bulimic wife, It took me months to finish this book, forcing me to recall, reconcile and find an empathy that was never before available to me. I wish i had read it 20 years ago when the first sign of the demon appeared. There is no guide for the spouse of someone allficted with an eating disorder, but this is the next best thing. Every chapter both clearly informing but painfully re-living the horrors of the rollercoaster. Every husband and parent needs this information. The signs, the treatments, the pathological condidions that destroy rational thought, the hiding, lying, and betrayls of trust will become recognizable and more than anything give you hope that there is chance AND a method for recovery.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Concerned Dad

As a father to a newly diagnosed daughter, I found this book to be very helpful in knowing another family's experience in dealing with this medical condition. The author provided a great balance of her experience in caring for her daughter with medical and historic information about eating disorders.

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UNREAL

What did you love best about Brave Girl Eating?

The narration was so powerful. This is a real mother describing her own excruciating battle against her daughter's anorexia with such candor and bravery.

What about Harriet Brown’s performance did you like?

She writes it the way it really happened. And she says it the way it happened. She is not overly emotional. She is straightforward in a very real way.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

I listened to this book with hardly any breaks - TWICE!

Any additional comments?

Thank you for sharing your story. It helped us immeasurably in our own fight against this horrible devil.

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  • ms. k
  • atlanta, GA
  • 06-04-15

Awesome, encouraging and informative!

Im a 23 year old model and I guess I didn't really realize I had an eating disorder until about a month ago. I've probably had it since I was 15, but I've managed to yoyo my weight to appear normal at time, but I was afraid of growing up and not being the same me that I've always been and add in other stressful factors of life and that equals to a full blown eating disorder. I'm 89.4 lbs right now and my lowest was probably 75lbs. My highest and happiest weight was in high school with my amazing boyfriend who we have since split and I was 5'6 127 pounds and hating every minute if it. I now know that I was completely physically healthy and mentally unhealthy. Your book is so familiar to me and every word is true about the mood swings and crying and everything. I can cry over a piece of sushi and not know why. My eating behaviors are bizarre to me, but now I know that I've created this demon and it's gonna be a hard kill to get rid of it, but I'm determined and I want to live. I'm afraid to die, but I think about it all the time and I just want to know that you are saving lives and you probably saved mines. I have one older sister so in the Kitty, but my sister is no Emma. My mom is definitely a Harriet and my dad's totally a Jamie! I love you and I'm gonna listen to this book when I'm in the dark corner and the demon is telling me food is the enemy.

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    3 out of 5 stars
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Angry Author Narrating

Brave Girl Eating is a mother's memoir describing the time when anorexia emerged in her 14 year old daughter's life. As a person without anorexia, I was mainly interested in this book to try to learn more about the disease, its causes, and cures. I had no particularly great interest in anorexia specifically, and took a bit of a chance on this book after its being recommended to me by Audible. My main criticism of this book is probably the venomous and angry voice of the author as she recounted her interactions with various health care professionals, insurance people, and even her family members. I can imagine that this book might be useful to other families touched by eating disorders, either as a comforting note of solidarity, or as a field journal from one particular implementation of family based treatment for anorexia. For me, the author's own ambivalence about food, and aforementioned acerbic tone, detracted from the book's attempts to shed light on various theories on the origins of eating disorders, and different treatment options. Also, bear in mind that the author is a not a medical professional by trade, and what she is doing is passing along her own ruminations on different studies, medical journal entries, and articles. I do believe that the author was trying to get helpful information out to the families of eating disorder sufferers, and yet I also think that she used this book to do a goodly amount of spleen venting.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Simon
  • 12-04-17

review

Overall I am glad I read this book and particularly enjoyed the sections of the book where the author shared researched data and projects as well as historical information. The downside to this book is that through no fault of her own the author’s voice sounds young almost like the teenage daughter herself, so it was hard to imagine it was the mother you were listening too. Also I felt whilst she tried to uncover the effect that anorexia had on the family by labelling it the ‘demon’ I felt she detached herself and her daughter from the emotional reality and impact that the disorder had on the family. However, it’s worth a read if only for the interesting research she shares.