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Publisher's Summary

A collegiate Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Stacey Patton penned this moving memoir describing her tumultuous childhood growing up first in a state institution and then in a fractured foster family. Her hope is to shed new light on issues facing black families.

Growing up, Patton had very little sense of personal identity while living in the foster-care system. When she was adopted by a God-fearing and hard-working couple, she finally felt like she had a place in the world. But her life quickly descended into a nightmare when her new mother became increasingly domineering while her new father often acquiesced to his wife's blistering demands. Stacey would go on to pursue a Ph.D., but not before battling thoughts of suicide and even homicide.

©2007 Stacey Patton; (P)2008 Recorded Books

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

Moving-powerful & insightful

Interesting and educational. Easy to follow story but with facts and history mixed. The author allows you to look into portions of her life while educating us on portions of other lives.

Well written & nicely narrated.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

eye opening

There was a lot about this book that I loved. It helped me understand another culture in ways I never could have without experiencing the authors pain and ultimate survival.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Honest and moving.

Honest and movie portrayal of a young woman who overcame odds that seems to be stacked against her. The story is told in conjunction with historical references.
I appreciated her honesty and thoughtful discussions on the condition of modern America in regards to race.

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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Daryl
  • Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
  • 04-11-13

Introspective biography

Would you consider the audio edition of That Mean Old Yesterday to be better than the print version?

Yes. Robin Miles made this biography a real joy, both with her depiction of many characters and depth of emotions - anger, pain, sorrow. One would lose out by simply reading the print version.

What was one of the most memorable moments of That Mean Old Yesterday?

When Stacey had her interview for the high school and the subsequent wating and hoping... She wrote it well and Robin Miles narrated it pitch-perfectly.

Any additional comments?

As a white Canadian woman, I cannot say that I would normally relate to Stacey's experience as a black teenager... but Stacey's style is so universal that it didn't really seem to matter.
The only real drawback in this book is that the prologue was never really resolved. One does not get an understanding of what caused Stacey to act the way she did, nor how she got back on track. That aside, this is an engrossing complex read, well-done!