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Publisher's Summary

The Nobel Lecture in Literature, delivered by Kazuo Ishiguro (The Remains of the Day and When We Were Orphans) at the Swedish Academy in Stockholm, Sweden, on December 7, 2017.

In their announcement of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Literature, the Swedish Academy recognized the emotional force of Kazuo Ishiguro's fiction and his mastery at uncovering our illusory sense of connection with the world. In the eloquent and candid lecture he delivered upon accepting the award, Ishiguro reflects on the way he was shaped by his upbringing, and on the turning points in his career - "small scruffy moments...quiet, private sparks of revelation" - that made him the writer he is today.

With the same generous humanity that has graced his novels, Ishiguro here looks beyond himself, to the world that new generations of writers are taking on, and what it will mean - what it will demand of us - to make certain that literature remains not just alive, but essential.

An enduring work on writing and becoming a writer, by one of the most accomplished novelists of our generation.

©2017 Kazuo Ishiguro (P)2017 Random House Audio

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A Japanese Englishman

I've always been interested in Japan and its culture. When I found out that Remains of the Day was written by a Japanese Englishman, I was intrigued. This short speech from Mr. Ishiguro was interesting and insightful. I look forward to reading more of his books now that I know more about the author.