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Editorial Reviews

Janet Reitman's Inside Scientology seeks to provide the first unbiased and holistic overview of the divisive faith that is Scientology. Reitman focuses on five key elements of the Scientology story: a history of the religion's rise, as well as the rise of its creator, L. Ron Hubbard; a detailed account of the vicious internal coup by current leader, David Miscavige; the sad and shocking story of the death of Scientologist Lisa McPherson; an outline of the controversial "celebrity strategy"; and multiple narratives detailing the current mass exodus from a corrupt and abusive church.

Narrator Stephen Hoye does an excellent job with the book, which presents many unique challenges. He successfully tackles a wide range of subject matter from Hubbard's sterile, futurist terminology to some of the more personal, emotionally gripping stories. Hoye serves as a calm voice of reason, guiding us through a potentially confusing world of Orgs, Tech, and more acroynms than a high-level business meeting.

The picture that emerges is a multifaceted one. Outsiders with cursory knowledge of the faith generally associate it with a crackpot Sci-Fi writer looking to make a buck, brainwashing techniques, salacious scandals, never-ending lawsuits, and a creation myth featuring aliens, volcanoes, and movie theaters. While Reitman doesn't exactly dispel these notions completely, she does provide rich historical background and a true look inside this mysterious faith. The truth about the religion, after all, is much more complex than what's presented on the surface.

The promises of Scientology range from the enriching (freedom from mental and emotion anguish) to the humanitarian (providing aid to developing countries and ways out of drug addiction) to the transcendent (immortal life, free of an earthy body). While people are drawn to the faith for all kinds of reasons, Reitman shows us that most Scientologists are just normal people trying to do good in the world and better themselves. Unfortunately, some of these people have been swept up in a devastating new movement within the upper ranks of the church, which has become increasingly obsessed with greed, domination, and power.

Perhaps the most artful facet of this book is that, in true journalistic style, Reitman does her best to simply present the facts and leave the conclusions to the listener. After all, like Hubbard used to say, "What's true is what is true for you." —Gina Pensiero

Publisher's Summary

Scientology, created in 1954 by a prolific sci-fi writer named L. Ron Hubbard, claims to be the world's fastest-growing religion, with millions of members around the world and huge financial holdings. Its celebrity believers keep its profile high, and its teams of "volunteer ministers" offer aid at disaster sites such as Haiti and the World Trade Center. But Scientology is also a notably closed faith, harassing journalists and others through litigation and intimidation, even infiltrating the highest levels of government to further its goals. Its attacks on psychiatry and its requirement that believers pay as much as tens and even hundreds of thousands of dollars for salvation have drawn scrutiny and skepticism. And ex-members use the Internet to share stories of harassment and abuse.

Now Janet Reitman offers the first full journalistic history of the Church of Scientology, in an even-handed account that at last establishes the astonishing truth about the controversial religion. She traces Scientology's development from the birth of Dianetics to today, following its metamorphosis from a pseudoscientific self-help group to a worldwide spiritual corporation with profound control over its followers and even ex-followers.

Based on five years of research, unprecedented access to church officials, confidential documents, and extensive interviews with current and former Scientologists, this is the defining book about a little-known world.

©2011 Janet Reitman (P)2011 Tantor

Critic Reviews

"A detailed and readable examination of the life of L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of the church, and his successor, David Miscavige." (Publishers Weekly)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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Massively Informative

Boatload of non-judgemental information about Scientology. A few times, it seemed a little more like a personal essay than an informative one, but I'd definitely recommend to anyone wanting to learn about L. Ron Hubbard's religion from a source that neither proselytizes or bashes.

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Interesting Topic and Story

This book was very detailed and surprisingly long. The author was descriptive enough to keep my attention without being boring. What an amazing "religion".

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SUPERB BOOK

Any additional comments?

I have read all I can about this cult, both books & internet, so was very surprised to learn so much more. It is brilliantly written & really does give on a full insight as to how insane it was when it al started & how shocking it is to this day. I would recommend though for a deeper look into the inner working as to how horrific Scientology is Leah Remini's book & also Jenna Miscarriage Hills, they will blow your socks off. They both got a full five stars from me & when started, could not stop listening.

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Scientology explained

Wow! I was very impressed with this book. It gives you a real look inside one of the most mysterious religions movements. I always thought Scientology was a weird religion but never knew exactly what it was about. This book really lays out the movement foundations and its current state.

The narrator was great. Never a dull moment.

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Very good look at the church's history

I have come across numerous criticisms of this book as not being hard enough on the church but I think Janet does a great job of in-depth reporting of its history and its crimes

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Good Listen

I really enjoyed this audio book. The performance was great and the content was great. I did feel that it dragged on on certain topics longer than it needed to and repeated the same things a LOT. Enough that if I were to be reading instead of listening, I probably would have put it down. It's definitely worth a listen and it's very entertaining.

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Well balanced.

Comprehensive and well-balanced. Good history from many different perspectives. Also read "Going Clear" - both are similar and good. Done.

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Not what I thought

I was hoping to learn about the religion and its peculiar belief system. Instead, the book wasn't so much about the religion, but the accusations, allegations and court cases against Scientology. I wish the book had a little bit more depth.

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  • jggedd
  • Worcester, MA
  • 04-30-15

Don't listen while driving

This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

I wouldn't recommend this audio book to anyone; the narration made a boring text even worse.

Has Inside Scientology turned you off from other books in this genre?

Perhaps. I would very carefully read reviews before I would purchase a similar book. I would especially avaoid this narrator.

Would you be willing to try another one of Stephen Hoye’s performances?

No.

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

I was disappointed, as I was looking forward to learning more about Scientology. However, I could not maintain my interest in this selection.

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Excellent

After watching s documentary on scientology I was curious to know more. I found this book very informative and a guide on what else to research in the field.