Regular price: $23.93

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

Millions of listeners have been flat-out astonished, profoundly moved, and massively entertained by the writing of Augusten Burroughs. Now, with A Wolf at the Table - his first full-length memoir in five years - Augusten returns to his literary roots as one of the most famous memoirists of our time, yet he makes a quantum leap forward into untapped emotional terrain: the radical pendulum swing between love and hate, the unspeakably terrifying relationship between father and son.

A Wolf at the Table is the story of Augusten's relationship with his father, John Robison, Sr., a man only briefly touched upon in Running With Scissors. Told with shocking honesty and penetrating insight, A Wolf at the Table is more than the companion volume to Running with Scissors - it's a story of stunning psychological cruelty and the redemptive power of hope.

Featuring exclusive, all new original songs by Patti Smith, Sea Wolf, Ingrid Michaelson, and Tegan Quin of Tegan and Sara.

©2008 Island Road, LLC (P)2008 Macmillan Audio

Critic Reviews

"There are books that were born for bells and whistles, and Augusten Burroughs's A Wolf at the Table is one....This fifth memoir of abuse and excess is read, bleated, rumbled and, at times, tearfully shouted by the author himself. The audio book...breaks new ground by presenting four songs written expressly for the production." (The Washington Post)
"Intense, sincere, and passionate, Burroughs offers a deeply felt, intimate portrait of the most disastrous period in his life. He holds nothing back, and in fully giving voice to his emotions, he makes each moment immediate for the listener." (AudioFile)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3.6 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    101
  • 4 Stars
    51
  • 3 Stars
    58
  • 2 Stars
    27
  • 1 Stars
    33

Performance

  • 4.0 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    56
  • 4 Stars
    19
  • 3 Stars
    19
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    10

Story

  • 4.0 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    56
  • 4 Stars
    20
  • 3 Stars
    18
  • 2 Stars
    7
  • 1 Stars
    8
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Jenny
  • St. Martinville, LA, United States
  • 05-31-08

Great!!

As usual, his writing is very entertaining & interesting. I've read almost all of his books & really enjoy his style.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Dennis
  • Washington, DC, United States
  • 05-22-08

Move to Another Table

Augustin Burroughs' account of emotional and physical abuse at the hands of his father is heart wrenching: No child should have to live with an ogre. The listener, however, should not have to listen to Burroughs' highly emotive narration that got in the way of the story. The first two hours were uninteresting because Burroughs was too young to remember much and what he did remember wasn't a bit fascinating. There is no let up in intensity; it's a straight line of horror without any relief.
The two stars are for the attempt at including four songs, only one of which was listenable.
Read "Running With Scissors" to get a feel for how good Burroughs can be.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Zzzzzz

Reading the phone book would be more stimulating. Get over yourself Augusten. This book may be a better Read than a Listen. I gave it almost 2 hours and could not stand another minute.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • William
  • Lafayette, CA, USA
  • 05-15-08

Time to move on...


It's been a week since I listened to Augusten Burroughs' A Wolf at the Table and the first word that still comes to mind is: painful. I have read and enjoyed all of Burroughs other books, each modulating the sadness with his good humor and slick writing style. But this book is painful in every aspect: The story, the writing, the narration and the production. The essence of this story is so horribly sad and, as the father of a 2 year old boy, pretty sickening. Other than to shed his own hurt and pain, I have no idea why he thought this book needed writing. The narration is glacial and self important, the "atmospherics" are distracting and the music is, well, horrible. The whole production is utterly self-indulgent in absolutely every way. Mr. Burroughs is an excellent writer who can be so thoughtful while telling a difficult story in a light and funny style. I think he needs to say goodbye to his family and move on to other, less destructive topics.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Todd
  • Orlando, FL, USA
  • 06-09-08

Pass On This One

I have read all of Augusten's previous books and enjoyed them pretty much throughout, but I just can't get into this one at all. I'm sure the experiences he describes must have been difficult for him, but I couldn't bring myself to care enough to keep going. Totally failed to capture my interest.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

A Wolf at the Table

For any child who has been at the mercy of dysfunctional crazy parents, this book will resonate.
Couldn't put it down.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Dreadful Narration

It's almost impossible to tell if the story is compelling or even remotely interesting when the narration is this bad.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Bad, bad, nothing but bad

This book was nothing but bad narration and horrible cruelty to animals. It was awful! The story drags and has weird music inserted in odd areas of the book that made no sense. Oh yeah, and did I mention the BAD narration?

0 of 2 people found this review helpful