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Another Kind of Madness

A Novel
By: Ed Pavlic
Narrated by: Ron Butler
Length: 14 hrs and 12 mins
2 out of 5 stars (2 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Ndiya Grayson returns to her childhood home of Chicago as a young professional, but even her high-end job in a law office can't protect her from half-repressed memories of childhood trauma. One evening, vulnerable and emotionally disarrayed, she goes out and meets her equal and opposite: Shame Luther, a no-nonsense construction worker by day and a self-taught piano player by night. The love story that ensues propels them on an unforgettable journey from Chicago's South Side to the coast of Kenya as they navigate the turbulence of long-buried pasts and an uncertain future.  

A stirring novel tuned to the clash between soul music's vision of our essential responsibility to each other and a world that breaks us down and tears us apart, Another Kind of Madness is an indelible tale of human connection.

©2019 Ed Pavlic (P)2019 HighBridge Company

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Stew Of Chapters

I tried to like this book, I really did, but it is so poorly organized that it came out in a stew of chapters, and not a very appetizing stew at that. After listening to it twice, all I have is a character roster with missing entries, two locations, and a vague outline of the story. The author gives what is essentially an ode to a spider more time than he does filling in the holes in the background of the main characters. He has holes everywhere in the story, and to such a degree that we readers are practically filling them with our own ideas. His mind may be that analytical, his perception that far out, but assigning the couple such bizarre traits serves only to muddy up an already hard to follow path. When the back story is as important as the present one, and readers are being bounced back and forth in time with no warning, it might be a good idea to let us in on the important stuff right away, LIKE WHO THE NARRATOR IS TO ONE OF THE MAIN CHARACTERS! Would have made it less nonsense, but I don't think making sense is a priority for this guy.