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The Art of Letting Go: Living the Wisdom of Saint Francis | [Richard Rohr]

The Art of Letting Go: Living the Wisdom of Saint Francis

We often think of saints as rare individuals whose gifts far exceed our own, and St. Francis is no exception. But for Fr. Richard Rohr, a prolific author and renowned speaker, the life and teachings of this beloved figure offer an authentic spirituality we can all embody.
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Publisher's Summary

We often think of saints as rare individuals whose gifts far exceed our own, and St. Francis is no exception. But for Fr. Richard Rohr, a prolific author and renowned speaker, the life and teachings of this beloved figure offer an authentic spirituality we can all embody.

On the Art of Letting Go, Fr. Rohr gives us a six session learning course that explores: the surprising richness we discover by simplifying our lives - without taking a vow of poverty; liberation from our self-limiting biases and certitudes; contemplation and action, two key steps toward communing more deeply with the Divine, and more.

©2010 Sounds True (P)2010 Sounds True

What Members Say

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  •  
    Michael Rochester, MN, United States 11-22-11
    Michael Rochester, MN, United States 11-22-11 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "A spiritual retreat of sorts"

    I really enjoyed listening to this program. It was as if I was on a spiritual retreat as I listened to Richard Rohr talk about the life of St. Francis and apply it to my life today. The insights offered transcended religion and dogma and addressed my real spiritual needs. For anyone trying to learn how to "Let go and let God," this is right on target.

    7 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    connie Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada 02-20-11
    connie Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada 02-20-11 Member Since 2007

    trying to see the world with my ears

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "delivery a bit disappointing;still a 5 star listen"

    As a long time listener of Rohr audio (tapes dating back to 1976), I found the delivery in this sounded more "scripted" than his usual dynamic and enthusiastic spontaneous style. However, it condenses and updates his older audio "Spirituality of Subtraction" very nicely. This retreat is directed at a broader audience than his usual Christian, and that somehow broadens his presentation of Francis' radical critique of society even more.

    Good to see a teacher like Rohr on Sounds True and Audible.

    He is not a fad teacher and walks the talk (or the silence), and has been doing so for decades. His wisdom grows over the years and can benefit anyone interested in spirituality, no matter the variation.

    15 of 16 people found this review helpful
  •  
    John Charlotte, NC, United States 01-14-11
    John Charlotte, NC, United States 01-14-11 Member Since 2009
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    "Well Done Brother!"

    On your spiritual journey seeking God, Fr Richard Rohr brings St Francis to life. He alows us to visualize with great clarity how St Francis was able to Let Go from things of this world. I found in The Art of Letting Go, as Pope John Paul II said on his death bead, "I have been searching for you all my life, and now you have found me" has a new meaning.

    12 of 13 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Adam Shields Marietta, GA, USA 08-01-13
    Adam Shields Marietta, GA, USA 08-01-13 Member Since 2003

    Book blogger at Bookwi.se

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    "Series of lectures on spiritual development"

    Over the last couple months I have come to the conclusion that Evangelicals (of whom I am one) are good at sharing the gospel and keeping the importance of conversion squarely in their sights.

    But I have also come to see that groups that assume the large scale Christianity of their communities (those that have been state churches) have done much more thinking about how to live as a Christian.

    It is cliche (and I think at least partially true) that Evangelicals are interested in you up until your conversion. After that I think we fall into the Paul problem of continuing to feed one another spiritual milk. We are still trying to save one another. But I think those that theologically are more oriented toward infant baptism and Christendom have thought more about living as a Christian. (The negative for them is that they also now need to evangelize their own as Christendom has broken down.)

    There is nothing wrong with keeping the gospel at the forefront of our Christianity. But that does not mean that we need to keep the basic gospel message as the main content of our Christian teaching.

    So I have been seriously thinking about finding a Roman Catholic spiritual director particularly because I want to learn more about spiritual growth from a different perspective. (On the other hand I have had a couple Evangelicals recommended to me, if you think of it, this is something I am still praying through and I would welcome your prayer for me.)

    Richard Rohr has been interesting to me since I first read his book Falling Foward. Later I listened to his lectures that were turned into a book Why Be Catholic. And I want to read more about his work in male initiation rites and spiritual development.

    But as I was looking around for an audiobook the other day I picked up The Art of Letting Go. It is not a book that is narrated, but rather six talks that are packaged together as an audiobook. They sound like they were prepared for those that want to go on a spiritual retreat with Rohr, but can only listen to an audiobook or lecture instead.

    Many Evangelicals will probably find multiple places strange and questionable. But on the whole these are much more like Eugene Peterson’s memoir The Pastor or Marilynne Robinson’s Gilead. These sound more like a personal conversation with a spiritual mentor about how to grow spiritually.

    There are six different sections, each about an hour about an area that Rohr thinks we need to let go of in order to grow spiritually. There is so much content here (in just 6 hours) that I will not attempt to recount it but only give a few thoughts. St Francis is a reoccurring character, but not really the subject of the book. The main subject of the book is the paradox of Christianity that God often uses what we perceive as loss to help us grow.

    So we experience pain and through that pain we realize that we are not in charge of our lives and we give up trying to control a particular area of life and then God is able to draw us in to a deeper spiritual connection with him.

    One thing I thought is useful is that Rohr is careful to say that people that are not growing spiritually are still Christian. And I think that is part of the problem with Evangelical theology (mine included) that we mix up redemption and sanctification. From the point of Salvation we are saved. But that is just the start of our spiritual growth as a Christian. God desires more for us, but does not force it on us. There is a paradox of the reality that we cannot growth spiritually under our own power, but God gives us the power (through the Holy Spirit) to move forward spiritually. But it seems that not being obedient and not following God allows us to miss out on spiritual growth.

    Spiritual growth is not a knowledge problem, it is an obedience problem. This has been a reoccurring theme of my reading lately. And it is one that is hard to get around.

    This is a series of lectures that needs more than one sitting. I think I will put it on my calendar to listen to again in another year.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amazon Customer Melville, Saskatchewan Canada 05-13-12
    Amazon Customer Melville, Saskatchewan Canada 05-13-12 Member Since 2012
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    "Heart and Soul Provoking.."
    Would you listen to The Art of Letting Go again? Why?

    I have listened to it 3 times and get something new each time


    What did you like best about this story?

    Answered my question as to why I don't feel at home in this world...


    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Blitch 66 Rome, Italy 02-08-14
    Blitch 66 Rome, Italy 02-08-14 Member Since 2014

    Somewhere between nowhere & now here.

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    "Excellent"
    What did you love best about The Art of Letting Go?

    Father Richard sounded both organized and realistic. It sounded more like a 5 hour talk with a friend than an audiobook. I didn't have the sense that he was reading from notes as much as speaking from the heart. I'll listen to this a few more times easily.


    What about Richard Rohr’s performance did you like?

    Real.
    Kind.
    Insightful.
    Wise.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Lance Troy, MI, United States 06-24-11
    Lance Troy, MI, United States 06-24-11 Member Since 2007
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    "Longest homily - ever."

    A lot of good information, but the narrator, could be due to the content, made it sound like the longest homily I've ever heard. I do regret using a credit for this download.

    4 of 11 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Andrea PIKEVILLE, KY, United States 05-18-12
    Andrea PIKEVILLE, KY, United States 05-18-12 Member Since 2011

    Andrea~Isa61

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    "a lot of liberal, a little Francis"

    I really wanted to love this book. It contains so much of Rohr's liberal opinions & so little of Francis's teachings, I simply could not. From exampling talking down to a less educated congregation to claiming someone living in a state the Bible declares sin is holy, it is extremely awkward to digest this book through the lens of God's Holy Word. As a Christian & clergy, I agree there is much we need to let go. The truth of Scripture, however, is certainly not on that list, & never shall be for those who love Christ & keep His Word.
    Sadly disappointing.

    6 of 25 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Tom San Diego, CA, United States 11-02-12
    Tom San Diego, CA, United States 11-02-12 Member Since 2010
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    "Appallingly bad"
    What would have made The Art of Letting Go better?

    I was hoping for a book on letting go of material things and instead I got a retread of Jimmy Carter's 1970s "Malaise" speech. Richard motivates Letting Go through either easily disproved assertions or foundational principles that are temporary. We're too materialistic these days, so we need to let go of things. So if we lived in, say, the Great Depression, it would be OK to party on? Franciscan attitudes should be preached independent of political leanings and current events, but Richard cannot let go of these. The book is dragged down by them to the point where I tried each chapter, looking for something free of Richard's personal ax-grinding, but never found it.


    Would you ever listen to anything by Richard Rohr again?

    Probably not. His political world view permeated what I hoped would be a spiritual book.


    How did the narrator detract from the book?

    Richard may well be a gifted theologian, but he's no voice actor.


    1 of 13 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-9 of 9 results
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  • Ms. D. Shaw
    UK
    4/14/13
    Overall
    "Revolutionary Idea in a Materialistic World"

    This is an excellent audio book. I have listened to this so many times I have lost count. So many ideas spoken in a non judgemental way, by someone that is obviously 'walking the walk'. I listened to his orignal tapes, way back when (he says of himself he was pushy in them) and the journey he has himself been on is evident. He does not expect you to accept anything he says, he is merely putting ideas and his own observations on the spiritual life.



    I, like many people have accumulated many bits and pieces to supposedly help me on my journey and have found that although some may have helped, there is a point where letting thngs go is definitely the way forward. The author uses St Francis of Assissi as an example but having a Christial faith is not necessary to get the most out of this audio book. Letting go is not just about letting go of things it's also about letting go of the idea we have to travel upwards, improve ourselves by acts of will (and many more things) If we are to truly improve ourselves (yes heres a paradox) we have to travel inwards, travel downwards and let go.



    My summary is of course no where near as elegant or as well said as in the audio book, I only hope that I have explained it well enough so that I don't put you off buying it as I would recommend this book to anyone wo is sincerely walking their own spiritual path, no matter what tradition the most heavily draw from.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Jude McDowall
    Warrington, Cheshire United Kingdom
    12/24/12
    Overall
    "Life Changing"

    Richard is just so down to earth His gentle delivery and relaxed style encourage you to really listen to the message based on the teachings of St Francis

    I'm on my third time through this book and the message just gets stronger each time A wonderful counter to an ever more manic world

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Amazon Customer
    Edinburgh, United Kingdom
    12/23/12
    Overall
    "Gentle wisdom"

    Rohr's gentle, conversational tone nonetheless contains wisdom that could change your life if you let it. If you want your life to be more centred and less frenetic then this is the book for you, no matter what faith group you belong to.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
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