Showing results by author "Tina Hesman Saey"

Categories

All Categories

115 results
Sort by
    • Big Data, Big Challenges

    • By: Tina Hesman Saey
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 20 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    In my quest to explore the unknown frontier inside my own body, I stumbled upon one of the most intractable problems facing science.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Neandertal DNA Poses Health Risks

    • By: Tina Hesman Saey
    • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
    • Length: 10 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    Finding Neandertal ancestors in the human family tree was shocking enough when researchers announced it in 2010. Now, the implications for modern-day people carrying surviving Neandertal DNA may prove just as stunning.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Antiaging Treatment Shows Promise

    • By: Tina Hesman Saey
    • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
    • Length: 4 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    Killing worn-out cells helps middle-aged mice live longer, healthier lives, a new study suggests. Removing those worn-out, or “senescent,” cells increased the median life span of mice 24 to 27 percent over that of mice in which senescent cells built up normally with age, Mayo Clinic researchers report. Clearing senescent cells also improved heart and kidney function.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Microbial Signals Influence Obesity

    • By: Tina Hesman Saey
    • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
    • Length: 5 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    Gut microbes cause obesity by sending messages via the vagus nerve to pack on pounds, new research in rodents suggests. Bacteria in the intestines produce acetate, a short-chain fatty acid that works through the brain and nervous system to make rats and mice fat, researchers report.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • A Sugar Can Melt Away Cholesterol

    • By: Tina Hesman Saey
    • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
    • Length: 4 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    A sugar that freshens air in rooms may also clean cholesterol out of hardened arteries. The sugar 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin, or cyclodextrin, removed cholesterol that had built up in the arteries of mice fed a high-fat diet, researchers report. The sugar enhances a natural cholesterol-removal process and persuades immune cells to soothe inflammation instead of provoking it, say immunologist Eicke Latz and colleagues.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Babies Low on Key Gut Bacteria at Higher Risk of Asthma

    • By: Tina Hesman Saey
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 min
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    First 100 days are critical period for microbe exposure.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Anti-inflammation Genes Linked to Longer Lives

    • By: Tina Hesman Saey
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 5 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    Stocking up on genes that help control inflammation leads to longer life spans for humans and other species, a new study suggests.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • CRISPR Gets a Makeover

    • By: Tina Hesman Saey
    • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
    • Length: 20 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    Scientists usually shy away from using the word miracle - unless they’re talking about the gene-editing tool called CRISPR/Cas9. “You can do anything with CRISPR,” some say. Others just call it amazing.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Signs of Food Allergies Seen at Birth

    • By: Tina Hesman Saey
    • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
    • Length: 3 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      2 out of 5 stars 1

    Some babies are born with immune cells primed to cause food allergies, a new study suggests.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • The research is inconclusive but . . .

    • By Apallo on 05-27-18

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Potential Ingredient for Alien Life Found on Titan

    • By: Tina Hesman Saey
    • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
    • Length: 3 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    Vinyl cyanide on the Saturnian moon could form millions of cell-like balls in methane oceans.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Toxicologists Look to Epigenetics

    • By: Tina Hesman Saey
    • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
    • Length: 8 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    Chemical tags on DNA could one day help assess exposure risks.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Research Teams Duel Over Native American Origins

    • By: Tina Hesman Saey
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 6 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    A previously hidden genetic link between native peoples in Australia and the Amazon has inspired two different teams of researchers to reach competing conclusions about the origins of Native Americans.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • DNA Tests Inflate Species Counts

    • By: Tina Hesman Saey
    • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
    • Length: 4 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    Classification requires many types of data, researchers say.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Eggs Grown from Mouse Skin Cells

    • By: Tina Hesman Saey
    • Narrated by: Jamie Renell
    • Length: 4 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    For the first time, researchers have grown eggs entirely in a lab dish. Skin-producing cells called fibroblasts from the tip of an adult mouse’s tail have been reprogrammed to make eggs, Japanese researchers report. Those eggs were fertilized, and when implanted in female mice, grew into six healthy mice. The accomplishment could make it possible to study the formation of eggs - a mysterious process that takes place inside fetuses.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • In Babies, Turning Down Inflammation Soothes the Hurt

    • By: Tina Hesman Saey
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 2 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In the new study, researchers used rats and mice to learn how youngsters fend off nerve pain. Nerve injury in adolescent and adult rodents caused inflammation and pain when the animals had to bear weight on the injured side or were exposed to heat or cold. But something else happened in infant mice: Their immune systems produced anti-inflammatory chemicals when nerves were injured, Rebecca McKelvey and Maria Fitzgerald of University College London and collaborators discovered.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Life's Cycles: Poking Holes in Classic Models of Circadian Clock Evolution

    • By: Tina Hesman Saey
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 20 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    The Earth has rhythm. Every 24 hours, the planet pirouettes on its axis, bathing its surface alternately in sunlight and darkness. Organisms from algae to people have evolved to keep time with the planet's light/dark beat. They do so using the world's most important timekeepers: daily, or circadian, clocks that allow organisms to schedule their days so as not to be caught off guard by sunrise and sunset. A master clock in the human brain appears to synchronize sleep and wake with light. But there are more. Circadian clocks tick in nearly every cell in the body.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Baby Brains Undergo Dramatic Changes In Utero

    • By: Tina Hesman Saey
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 4 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    The developing brain undergoes rapid and tightly coordinated changes in a molecular process known to help regulate gene activity, a new study shows.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • Blood Test Can Predict Breast Cancer Relapse

    • By: Tina Hesman Saey
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 4 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    Cancer DNA in the blood can signal breast cancer’s return long before scans spot it, a new study shows.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • For Penguins, It.s a Matter of No Taste

    • By: Tina Hesman Saey
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 3 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    Despite their dapper appearance, penguins have remarkably little taste, a new study finds.

    Regular price: $1.95

    • New Catalog of Human Genetic Variation Could Improve Diagnosis

    • By: Tina Hesman Saey
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 6 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    Analysis of protein-coding DNA may help narrow which mutations really cause genetic diseases.

    Regular price: $1.95

Show titles per page
  • 1
  • 2
  • ...
  • 6