Showing results by author "Macat Int"

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    • A Macat Analysis of Robert Putnam's Bowling Alone

    • By: Macat Int
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 32 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 6
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 5
    • Story
      3 out of 5 stars 5

    Social capital - the relationships between people that allow communities to function well - has long been recognized as the grease that oils the wheels of society. It facilitates trust, creates bonds among neighbors, and even helps boost employment. In his 2000 book, Bowling Alone, American sociologist Robert Putnam argues that Americans have become disconnected from one another and from the institutions of their common life and investigates the consequences of this change.

    • 2 out of 5 stars
    • Repetitive and lacks detail

    • By Cat Bennet on 03-31-17

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Francis Fukuyama's The End of History and the Last Man

    • By: Macat Int
    • Narrated by: Macat Int
    • Length: 1 hr and 47 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 12
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 12
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 12

    When American political scientist Francis Fukuyama published The End of History and the Last Man in 1992, Western liberal democracies seemed to have won the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union. Fukuyama believed liberal democracy had triumphed for a reason. Any political system containing "fundamental contradictions," he thought, would eventually be replaced by something else. For Fukuyama, communism was such a system.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • An essential retrospective review

    • By Sura on 04-19-17

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Keith Thomas' Religion and the Decline of Magic

    • By: Macat Int
    • Narrated by: Macat Int
    • Length: 1 hr and 32 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      1 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      3 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      1 out of 5 stars 1

    Religion and the Decline of Magic examines popular belief in 16th and 17th century England, a key period during which leaders of the Protestant Reformation tried to disentangle magic from religion itself. Thomas argues that magic was popular because it offered practical solutions to everyday problems. Few social historians had examined the popular religious beliefs of the 1500s at the time Thomas wrote Religion.

    Regular price: $6.95