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Publisher's Summary

On the morning of the vernal equinox in 1899, Holmes is roused from his bed by Lestrade. The inspector has received a report of a girl brutally murdered at Stonehenge.

Upon arriving at the famed site, Holmes discovers the body of a young woman. On her forehead, painted in blood, is a druidic symbol. On her side, also in blood, is a message written in a strange language that neither Holmes nor Lestrade can decipher. The girl was also eviscerated and her organs placed around her body. As a final touch, branches from yew trees had been artistically arranged around the corpse.

Holmes senses a malevolent force at work, but without data, he is powerless. As the weeks pass, he slowly gathers information about the ancient druids and Celtic mythology and begins to assemble a small army of experts to assist him.

Expecting the killer to strike again on the summer solstice, Holmes and Watson travel to the Nine Ladies in Derbyshire, the site of another stone circle that harkens to druidic times. While they are holding their vigil, Lestrade and his men are off keeping watch over the stone circles at Avebury and several other locations.

The Great Detective's worst fears are realized when on the morning of the summer solstice, he learns that the body of a young man has been discovered in the eye of the White Horse of Uffington. Like the first victim, he too has been marked with a druidic symbol and his body bears a message. Aside from the symbol and the message, the only other difference appears to be that his body and organs have been surrounded by willow branches.

Realizing full well that a maniac reminiscent of the Ripper is on the loose, Holmes and Watson find themselves in a race against time as they try to locate the cult, identify the killer and prevent another tragedy.

©2018 Rich Ryan (P)2018 MX Publishing

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Holmes returns in the vein of Sir Arthur himself

I am without a doubt a Holmesian. It is in my core. I grew up watching Basil Rathbone movies with my grandmother, and as soon as I could I dug into his own material, the good stuff so to speak, and immersed myself in the writings of a brilliant man. I have been hooked and find myself drawn to any incarnation of Holmes that I can find, with the exception of the travesty of a tv show that has Lucy Liu as Watson. I don't care about Watson being Asian or female, only that the show ranks in the worst way. Until Cumberbatch came along I would have told you my definitive Holmes was Jeremy Brett, now I have two favorites. I endure the Downey films. Anyway, that is a list of my bona fides. I cannot tell you how many times I have read Doyle's words, and I am drawn to new stories whenever I can find them.

Thankfully, I can report that the Druid of Death has the feel of a Holmes story crafted by ACD himself. It has all the requisite elements, and the characterizations of Holmes and Watson are spot on. I really couldn't ask for more, but thankfully, Ryan provides a stunning mystery for Holmes to solve and a villain up to Holmes standards. I thoroughly enjoyed every minute that I listened to this tale, and sincerely hope that Master Craftsman Ryan opts to do more Holmes in the future. That is the best compliment I can provide. The writing reflects Doyle's but doesn't stagnate on it, and is complex and thought provoking.

Peever provides the voice of Watson (as well as the rest, but since he is the one to tell the stories . . ) an is impeccable at it. I enjoyed listening to him tell the tale, and believed that he carried the story along at a fine pace, and that he provided all the shock and awe that Holmes inspired in his friend. I had not heard him do any readings up till now, but I have to say that I think he is a fine narrator.

If you are any kind of a Sherlock Holmes fan then this is the place for you to go to get a new "fix", and the story is just long enough that you mind find it to be a three pipe tale! Even though I did receive a promo code for this review it in no way influenced my considerations of the material, and in fact, inspired me to be more honest. Getting a code generally makes me harsher as a reviewer as I am more often concerned what someone like Me will decide based on my review.

If this review helped, please press the YES below. Thank you immensely!!!

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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When you eliminate the impossible.

I have always been a fan of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes and while there have been many attempts to recreate the magic of Sherlock Holmes, few have been successful. This story was really in the vein of the original and I think Richard Ryan did the legacy justice. The plot and setting were as if Arthur actually wrote it and everything was in place. There were a few Holmesian things I was looking for and they showed up. The author clearly knows how to do Sherlock Holmes. If I hadn't already read all of his stories I would absolutely believe this was one of his.

The plot was done quite well and the mystery is afoot. I really like the setting of historic places while Holmes tries to solve the case. Everything felt like a classic Holmes story and I was really impressed. Every Holmes story makes me try figure out the ending before it happens, this one was easy. Like Scooby Doo this laid out the information to decide who done it. It was still a solid story and I want more. The fact that this it is still told from Watson’s POV made me happy. Any Sherlock Holmes fan will enjoy this story.

I have always thought Basil Rathbone was the voice of Sherlock and Nigel Bruce was Dr. Watson. I have to say that Nigel Peever did a great job for both. His ability to switch voices for the different characters immediately was amazing. For a bit I thought there were different narrators. I am totally on board with Nigel being the voice of SH. Nigel nailed Dr. Watson and I hope he stays his voice.

I was voluntarily provided this free review copy audiobook by the author, narrator, or publisher

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Great Story!

I received this audio book for free in exchange for my honest review. The writing and narration in this excellent Sherlock Holmes mystery story are both impeccable. I thoroughly enjoyed it and I'm sure that you will as well.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Good story, bad narration

I think the story would be so much better with better narration, since when doe,s Sherlock have a lisp.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Deedra
  • 10-01-18

The Druid of Death

Great Sherlock Holmes story read by wonderful narrator.,Nigel Peever.I relly enjoyed it!I was given this book by the narrator,author or publisher free for an honest review.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful