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Publisher's Summary

In conversations with the Dalai Lama over the past several years, Howard Cutler has asked the questions we all want answered about how to find happiness in the place we spend most of our time - work. Beginning with the basic need to find satisfaction in our careers, Dr. Cutler questions His Holiness about the nature of work. In psychiatry and according to the Dalai Lama, our motivation for working determines our level of satisfaction. The Art of Happiness at Work explores these three levels of focus:
  • Survival: focus on salary, stability, food and clothing
  • Career: focus on advancement
  • Calling: focus on work as a higher purpose

Dr. Cutler probes the Dalai Lama's wisdom by posing these questions: What is the relationship between self-awareness and work? How does lack of freedom at work affect our levels of happiness? How can we deal with boredom or lack of challenge? Job change and unemployment? How much of our misery comes from our identity being tied up with work?

Dr. Cutler walks us through the Dalai Lama's reasoning so that we may know how to apply his wisdom to daily life. The Art of Happiness at Work is an invaluable source of strength and peace for anyone who earns a living.

©2003 His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Howard Cutler, M.D. (P)2003 Simon & Schuster Inc. All Rights Reserved. SOUND IDEAS is an imprint of Simon & Schuster Audio Division, Simon & Schuster Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4 out of 5 stars
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    119
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  • 3 Stars
    29
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    11

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    11
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Story

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Suzanne
  • oakland, CA, USA
  • 11-17-05

t

Great Story, terrible story teller! the words of the Dali Lama are timeless, precious, and amazing. But the narrator is so monotone, so without any emotion and such a terrible narrator, that it was very difficult to make it through the irritating commentary. This surprises me, as the narrator actually wrote the book. But clearly, he should have paid someone else to read the material, as he doesn't do his work justice in the least. I found his voice and complete lack of intonation and particular enunciation very distracting.

13 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars

Message is COMPLETELY lost

As an audio book, this is terrible. The message of the material is great but the author made a horrible mistake by reading it himself. His dry, passionless, delivery taxes even the most devoted fan of Buddhism. In contrast, the actor they chose as the voice of the Dalai Lama is completely over the top campy and cheesy. He honestly sounds like one of the voice-overs from the old kung fu movies of the 70's. The result is a completely disjointed, unauthentic presentation that either puts the reader to sleep or turns them off because of the awful, somewhat insulting caricature of an Asian accent.

I respect the Dalai Lama immensely and have enjoyed previous titles in print. I had to turn this one off half way through because of the terrible choices made in this audio format.

Don't waste your time or money on this title.

12 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars

How can you say the same thing for 5 hours

This is per exploitation of people who want a little more spirtual advice from his holiness. It covers same thing over and over again; while the author gives back up data from other psycholgist and socialolgist. Here is the whole gist of the book if you don't like your job either find another, think of something else while you are working, or suffer. I never been dissappointed in the Dali Lama's books. I am sure he had nothing to do with this as the author states in the beginning of the book.

Stick to the Art of Happiness
Or the Power of Now both great books

20 of 22 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Jes
  • Hobart, IN, United States
  • 04-09-14

Worthy read for those preparing to change jobs

I got this book and I wondered why until I realized I was considering changing jobs. I work in the stock trading industry and I’m VERY well compensated. However, I’m not happy at all! So, the other day while going through my audible library I came across this book I bought and hadn’t listened too. So, I did and the Dalai Lama is correct when he says, ‘if your not happy then you need to find what does make you happy.’ I like what I do and I enjoy the freedom it brings. However, I followed the very basic steps outlined in this book and realized that no matter how GREAT the compensation is it’s not worth the stress and BS. I’m now looking at a job that pays less, but gives me the same freedom. There are things more important in this world than money and I no longer care about what others think or what my peers are doing. Let them work themselves to death while I spend time with my family. If you’re not happy and you want to start figuring out why then this is the book for you.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

The Dalai Lama as a Factory Worker

Would you listen to The Art of Happiness at Work again? Why?

I would not listen to this book again,because some of the science in this book would have changed.

What other book might you compare The Art of Happiness at Work to and why?

Asperger's on the Job:Must-have Advice for People with Asperger's or High Functioning Autism,and their Employers...By Rudy SimoneThe Miracle of Mindfulness:An Introduction to the Practice of Meditation...By Thich Nhat Hanh

What about Howard Cutler and B.D. Wong ’s performance did you like?

The performance was believable and enjoyable,the performance did not sway my opinions of the book.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

My reaction to the book is the United States does not have factories to work in,but the book helps you take any task and make it more enjoyable.

Any additional comments?

The Dalai Lama seems to have a "Just War Theory",that comes out when conversation moves toward explaining what if your work is to making something explosive or generally dangerous and could create harm,but Buddhist have a "Non Harm",but in the right hands making weapons would be OK,all war needs to end in my opinion.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

some good info but not what i expected

It seems the author didnt feel that a self-titled book would sell. Altough the author confesses early that there may be no parallel between the Dalai Lama's lifework and happiness in the workplace in the western world, he still asks the question ad- nauseum of The Dalai Lama, and then argues with him over his answers. I would have been more interested in the author's own take on the studies he quotes about happiness in the workplace. He barely touched on the idea of expanding the identity of self beyond ones livelihood. Not only were the Dalai Lama's heady musings irrelevant to the topic of workplace satisfaction, but he introduced an entirely new problem that I'm sure no reader had previously considered and that is the buddhist idea of Rightful work, or work that in no way causes harm. So, if you thought you had issues with your work before, now you need to consider your works intrinsic and far reaching Good as well.
Although the authors narration was fine, the re-telling of The Dalai Lama's ideas was horrible. The giddy narration and ridiculous GIGGLING, which I guess was supposed to portray the Dalai Lama as a happy humorous person, was absolutely unbearable. So, although I would like to review some of the author's barely developed ideas, I can't possibly endure the portrayal of The Dalai Lama again.
I'd like to see the author rewrite the book himself and expand upon his own ideas about self identity, workplace culture, motivation and management. However THIS book plays like a shameless extension of a profitable book franchise.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • c
  • 03-22-17

This book is great! I'm glad I picked it.

Many things served as reminders to me and others are new learnings in approaching different situations in life. It made me a little sad that I finished the book. I have to start it again. Now I want to meet the Dalai Lama. The narration is not bad. The dialogues could have sound more realistic. But it's still good. sometimes I had some trouble understanding the Dalai Lama's stand-in voice when the voice maybe goes down and fades away or talks faster with the added accent. But it made me laugh hearing the chirpy laughter and could feel the happiness portrayed of the Dalai Lama.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

An honsrt and simple view of our complex lives

I love the step by step examples of stresses in our daily lives and the solutions or suggestions how to cope. perception was I found a very Key element throughout the journey in this book.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • James
  • Springfield, MA, USA
  • 10-25-03

Excelent, Highly advise to listen to this one!

Excelent narration and very helpful in todays workplace.

3 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Great book

A new way at looking at life and work. Wow really looked forward to each chapter. Check out this terrific book!

0 of 1 people found this review helpful