• The Americans at D-Day

  • The American Experience at the Normandy Invasion
  • By: John C. McManus
  • Narrated by: Joe Barrett
  • Length: 13 hrs and 9 mins
  • 4.7 out of 5 stars (538 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

June 6, 1944, was a pivotal moment in the history of World War II. On that day the climactic and decisive phase of the war in Europe began. Those who survived the intense fighting on the Normandy beaches found their lives irreversibly changed. That day ushered in a great change for the United States as well, because on D-day America began its march to the forefront of the Western world.

By the end of the Battle of Normandy, almost one out of every two soldiers involved was an American, and without American weapons, supplies, and leadership, the outcome of the invasion and ensuing battle could have been very different.

In the first of two volumes on the American contribution to the Allied victory at Normandy, John C. McManus examines, with great intensity and thoroughness, the American experience in the weeks leading up to D-day and on the great day itself. From the buildup in England to the night drops of airborne forces behind German lines and the landings on the beaches at dawn, from the famed figures of Eisenhower, Bradley, and "Lighting Joe" Collins to the courageous, but little-known privates who fought so bravely and under terrifying conditions, this is the story of the American experience at D-day. What were the battles really like for the Americans at Utah and Omaha? What drove them to fight despite all adversity? How and why did they triumph? Thanks to extensive archival research, and the use of hundreds of firsthand accounts, McManus answers these questions and many more.

Impressively researched, engrossing, lightning quick, and filled with human sorrow and elation, The Americans at D-Day honors those Americans who lost their lives on D-day, as well as those who were fortunate enough to survive.

©2013 John C. McManus (P)2017 Blackstone Audio, Inc.
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History

What listeners say about The Americans at D-Day

Average Customer Ratings
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Great Book

Everyone should read this book. The most complete account of D Day I ever heard.

2 people found this helpful

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Just Average

Book is enjoyable but pales compared with the many other outstanding WWII / European Theatre / DDay books out there. Narrator sounds like the guy from the Smuckers jelly ads that ran on tv a few years back. His tortured pronunciations of French locations is distracting, and apparently every single American G.I. had a southern drawl.

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The Greatest Generation

Was great because they killed Nazis by the tens of thousands. Hopefully our generation will stand up the new, rising Nazi like fascism from the right wing in the same way when the time comes.

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Only worth reading if you have never heard of DDay

This book is a boring rehash of Band of Brothers with less interesting asides and less depth while recycling much of Ambrose's research. Save yourself the time and skip it.

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Superb!

A meticulously researched event supported by fascinating primary sources and narrated by a great orator, Joe Barrett. Sierra Hotel!

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Great book

Amazing content! Questionable voice performance. Not bad overall but he tried to do voices and then seemed to give up halfway through. The most grating were when he tried imitating a Scotsman and a Mississippian. If your not going at doing voices don’t try because it doesn’t add to the immersive quality of the audio it does the opposite

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Good personal accounts. Not a lot of strategy

I did like the content of the book although I was hoping for a more strategic and operational view of the invasion. It tells some very good stories about individuals that fought that day however I would have like to heard follow ups on what happened to the names individuals.

Also the voice took a bit of time to get used to. Kind of gravely but got used to it after a while.

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Catnip to a history buff

Read well and packed with historical facts many of which I wasn't aware of.

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Awesome

loved it one of the best D Day historical accounts I have had the opportunity to find.

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D Day In Remarkable Detail

Everything you ever wanted to know about the various components that collectively is what we call D Day. No sugar coating the mistakes that cost many lives & the many stories about the REAL HEROS that Never got the credit they DESERVED !

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  • P. Overton
  • 05-22-22

An Excellent contribution to WW2 history telling.

This is an Excellent contribution to WW2 history telling. The personal stories are particularly useful.

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  • qwerty
  • 05-13-22

Competent, engaging but not new

If one ignores the usual American hyperbole then there is a fairly competent telling of a well know episode in the history of the second world war. However, an exhaustive historical study it is not.
It seems it's impossible for the US to make mistakes, be cowardly or incompetent. I refer to the usual excuses of the US transport command for the famous misdops of the 101 and 82 airborne Divisions. The implication that British LCA's were poor in comparison to LCVP's. No mention of the weather after Eisenhower's tortured decision.
The statement that the US on Omaha had the toughest assignment without reference to the use of the specialist equipment used on the anglo-canadian beaches which may have been even bloodier without, or have helped the Americans if included in their order of battle. Weather was the same obstacle of all five beaches. Although a story of US valour it didn't happen in isolation. Surprisingly, not much reference to the German defenders and their dispositions, just a vague surprise that they had prepared marked beating zones and range cards. SOP in all armies, even back to WW1.
Interesting personal stories saved this book from becoming a Hollywood marching band reading of an article of faith in the US of A.

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  • john brenchley
  • 04-24-22

Interesting story

Well read lots of details so we’ll researched. Very good listen. Not the usual hung ho

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  • Anonymous User
  • 09-04-22

Disappointing

I'm 12 minutes in and there are multiple errors to say the least. Saying by 1944 the Germans had the "man power" to hold two fronts. That the American "skill" is what won the Normandy invasion. And that the American army matched the Germans in skill and determination. That Rommel thought he could stop the Normandy invasion at the beaches. All uneducated facts from the view of an historian stuck in the 70s. The Americans won because of brute force, to say it was anything else is nothing less than ignorance. Kind of feels like a flash waving patriot ignoring established facts.
"Nor would be merely concentrate of Allied unity"
Wow, just wow. That's about all Eisenhower did.
Chapter 3 and the writer is contradicting his own writing. I'll done here. Don't waste your money.
I stopped listening when the writer referred to "Rommel's asparagus" as being used to impale airborne troops. Is he smoking crack?

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