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Publisher's Summary

"A writer of boundless confidence and bold scientific extrapolation" (New York Times) concludes his mindbending trilogy.

Webmind - the vast consciousness that spontaneously emerged from the infrastructure of the World Wide Web - has proven its worth to humanity by aiding in everything from curing cancer to easing international tensions. But the brass at the Pentagon see Webmind as a threat that needs to be eliminated. Caitlin Decter - the once-blind 16-year-old math genius who discovered, and bonded with, Webmind - wants desperately to protect her friend. And if she doesn't act, everything - Webmind included - may come crashing down.

BONUS AUDIO: Includes an exclusive introduction written and read by author Robert J. Sawyer.

Listen to the rest of the WWW Trilogy.
©2011 Robert J. Sawyer (P)2011 Audible, Inc.

Critic Reviews

"Sawyer shows mastery in his ability to move between complex scientific concepts and genuine and realistic characters....Wonder...is fast-paced and immediately engaging." (The Globe and Mail)
"The shining star of this near-perfect production is Jessica Almasy as the sweet teenager who introduces WebMind to the world. Her equal is Marc Vietor, the voice selected by the machine because of his brilliant work reading audiobooks. (Good inside joke there.) This story, the audiobook equivalent of a page-turner, challenges the listener to pick a side: human or machine. The answer is surprising." (Audiofile)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
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Performance

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Story

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
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Colossus: The Wonder Project

What made the experience of listening to WWW: Wonder the most enjoyable?

This is the third book in the trilogy. The first one was good, it established the background of the story. It felt disjointed and when the second book came along (the best of the three) it finally became a real story. I was excited to hear the third book. The last part of the trilogy was more about the government response than anything else. I was extremenly disappointed in the Caitlin Deckter part of the book. It went from a story of an emerging woman and her relationshp with Webmind, to one of a teenage girl who's thoughts of her boyfriend took center stage.The ads for the book talked about the Chinese man who partly created Webmind was part of the effort to dismember him. False advertising. How the book ended reminded me of a Doctor Who episode merged with Colossus: The Forbin Project. Very disappointing ending. A very cold ending.

Would you be willing to try another book from Robert J. Sawyer? Why or why not?

It appears Sawyer is a good writer and I will read more of his books. He weaves a good storyline.

What about the narrators’s performance did you like?

After time, the voice of Caitlin was annoying. I enjoyed Colonel Hume presentation. Sounded very government.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

No extreme reaction, just good listening. Did not tug my heartstrings.

Any additional comments?

A good trilogy, just don't listen to the last chapter

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • cliffton
  • melbourne, FL, United States
  • 01-25-12

Get them all.

A compelling argument for the origin-point and consequences of self-actualized A.I. -- Set in the ultra-near future-- Like, no kidding, next week "near future" --This story meshes golden-age style theorizing-- think Asimov-- with modern social consciousness-- think Doctorow-- and gets a very tailored and interesting result. A trifle slow to start in the first book, but once he gets going, Sawyer introduces more new ideas per-page than most contemporary sci-fi plot-lines. And he does it without fantastic or incredible elements-- outside of the perfect timing and collusion of real, albeit extremely rare, phenomena.
Now, I like explosions and ancient alien races a whole lot, just like most fans of this genre-- and this book doesn't go there. Instead of fantastic adventure outside of time and galaxy, we are plunged into the fantastic adventure that is our current lifestyle in advanced countries around the world. Sawyer could be offered a TED fellowship after this. I only have one critique about the story telling--it's just that---well, listening to teenage girls swooning over boys is a lot to ask, and not something I seek out. However, the sappy, love-struck, giddiness provides an emotional counterpoint that serves as a vehicle for several powerfully original suppositions about the consequences of social media. So...I guess it's a wash.
In short: A great story for idea junkies like me, not so great for hardcore fans of space-opera/ray-gun type science fiction. To the author: Thanks man! I wouldn't have learned about "confabulation" without you!

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Surprise of the year trilogy!

This was a total suprise. I can't find the words to praise this masterpiece! It was a long time since I found a recently written book so exciting. Not only the topic focusing on blindness is fresh, the story is exciting, full of fresh innovative ideas. Of course the singularity idea is not new per se but it doesn't hinder the story at all, it enriches the thema. I couldn't wait for every next chapter. Jessica Almasy's narration is excellent, you can't wish for any better. It perfectly fits to the character. Her voice is also very easily comprehensible and pleasure to listen to. I can't recommend this book high enough to anybody who would like to see one of the possible outcomes of the inevitable singularity phenomenon.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • sgtbuk1
  • Knoxville, TN United States
  • 07-06-11

Neuromancer for 8th-Graders

Having a series on television has definitely had an effect on Sawyer's writing style. This book, though mildly entertaining and well-read by the narrators, was still a dumbed-down take on William Gibson's Neuromancer. At least he gave Gibson a few hat-tips in the book. It should probably be in the young adult category, not grown-up sci-fi.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Dan
  • Battle Creek, MI, United States
  • 05-13-11

An Amazing Trilogy with Amazing Performers

I absolutely loved all 3 books, and I loved the voice acting. I found Caitlin's voice actress simply perfect. I listened to the series in quick succession, and even the last book kept me interested right up to the last sentence.

All in all, great sci-fi

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Weakest of this series of three.

I am a huge fan of Robert J. Sawyer or at least I was till I read this book. I have met him several times and he signed my complete set of the Neanderthal Parallax. However, I was very disappointed with his effort here. While Flashforward was one of his best stories to date, I was sorry to see that it's success and industry's weak effort to make it a TV show caused Hollywood's liberal elite to have a negative effect on him. By the time WebMind makes his acceptance speak late in the story I had become tired of the liberal, secular diatribe that was continuously being trodden out. A majority of it had nothing to the story and just became annoying by the time you reached the end. In the past he has kept these issues at the ???food for thought??? level. There are several examples of this in Calculating God and the aforementioned Neanderthal Parallax where I would stop reading to sit and think about a point that had been made, but it here it crossed the line to just plain preaching/bashing.

I realize as an author it is his prerogative to write as he see's fit and I still look forward to his next story, but if this trend continues, I am sorry to it will be the last I read.

5 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Wonder is Wonderful!

Could not stop listening. I will definitely watch the tv series...there will be one...right?

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Rodolphe
  • valdor, Quebec, Canada
  • 04-25-11

a good ending to the trilogy

I liked the series very much.
If you liked the other 2 novels, you wont be disappointed.
Web-mind is cool !

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Story

What a way to ruin a series

Instead of focusing and developing the story the author seems to be preaching a very disturbing agenda. He tries to build a story where his agenda is right because the result is better for humanity. In his opinion child pornography and teenage sex is morally right. His justification is "everybody does it, why should we be ashamed? While teen sex is common it shouldn't be encouraged as morally right. We shouldn't be saying sending nude pictures is morally right.

Per the story:

Atheism is best
Teenage sex is morally ok
Child pornography is ok
Hackers can be used for the good
Republicans are bigots
Liberalism is the natural result of humanity

While the series does open up interesting issues we shouldn't encourage our teens to read it.

2 of 5 people found this review helpful

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Children's book

What disappointed you about WWW: Wonder?

This book was so politically biased and predictable I could not help but think it should be marketed to the tween audience. I have no interest in reading the other two previous books by this author.

2 of 5 people found this review helpful